Poll Finds Most Americans Oppose Wall on U.S.-Mexico Border

08/25/16 The Wall Street Journal

Mexican-American_border_at_NogalesA majority of Americans oppose the construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and express views sympathetic to undocumented immigrants, according to a new Pew Research Center report released on Thursday.

The findings suggest most Americans are not aligned with the harsh anti-immigrant positions of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, and could explain why in recent days he has appeared to soften his stance.

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Mexico reclaims migrant-shuttling ‘The Beast’ railroad concession

08/23/16 Reuters

migrants1Mexico’s Communications and Transport Ministry said on Tuesday it had taken over a concession to a southern railroad, whose trains are known locally as “The Beast,” which thousands of Central American migrants have used to hitch rides to the United States.

The ministry scrapped the concession, which had belonged to the Ferrocarriles Chiapas-Mayab rail company, on the grounds of “public interest, public usage and national security,” it said in a statement, without elaborating.

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Trump on Immigration, Deportation, the US-Mexico Wall

08/22/16 The New York Times 

trumpA cornerstone of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign is a promise to deport the estimate 11 million immigrants living in the country illegally while also building a wall along the U.S-Mexico border. Trump says he will force Mexico to pay for the wall.

June 16, 2015

In his presidential announcement speech, Trump portrayed immigrants from Mexico as “bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime, they’re rapists, and some, I assume, are good people.” Trump also boasted about his ability to fortify the border with Mexico: “Nobody builds walls better than me.”

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San Diego Built a Bridge Over Its Border Wall

8/17/2016 Real Clear World 

WASHINGTON - MARCH 27:  A protester holds an American flag and a Mexican flag while participating in a protest on the west front of the U.S. Capitol March 27, 2006 in Washington, DC. Thousands of immigration advocates rallied on Capitol Hill to protest the immigration bill that is before Congress.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON – MARCH 27: A protester holds an American flag and a Mexican flag while participating in a protest on the west front of the U.S. Capitol March 27, 2006 in Washington, DC. Thousands of immigration advocates rallied on Capitol Hill to protest the immigration bill that is before Congress. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

This piece was created in collaboration with The Wilson Center. Andrew Selee is the founding director of The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

The idea of building a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico has gained traction again in this election year. The timing may be a little unusual: Illegal immigration from Mexico is negligible these days, with the overall unauthorized population dropping noticeably since 2008. Further, for the first time in decades, there are almost certainly more Mexicans leaving the United States than coming here.

City leaders in San Diego, America’s seventh largest city and the only one in the top 10 governed by a Republican mayor, have actually pursued a different approach to the border. Instead of asking for a higher wall, San Diego’s leaders decided to build a bridge over the piece of wall they already had. That bridge, a futuristic structure spanning majestically over the border fence below, allows San Diegans to use Tijuana’s much larger airport to take flights to Asia and Latin America. Since it was inaugurated in December 2015, San Diego flyers have been able to check into their flights on the U.S. side of the pedestrian bridge, walk across into Mexico, going through immigration and customs as they go, and head straight to their gate at the General Abelardo L. Rodriguez Airport in Tijuana.

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The World Is Full of Walls That Don’t Work

08/16/2016 Politico 

border_at_Tijuana Tomas CastelazoAcross the world, building walls has become the political strategy favored by nations convinced that barriers are the only way to deal with difficult neighbors. In some regions, walls are used to claim territory; in others, they are used to separate warring factions; in yet others, they are meant to keep the unwanted out.

Donald Trump shares this view. The centerpiece of his presidential platform from the beginning has been building a wall between Mexico and the United States to stop illegal immigration, getting Mexico to pay for the concrete structure, and outlawing amnesty for immigrants already in the U.S. without documentation. (He presents this as a new initiative, without mentioning that the U.S. has just completed building 651 miles of fencing and walls along our southern border.)
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After Years Apart, Reunited Families Get To Hug Across The US-Mexico Border

08/11/2016 Fronteras

border_at_tijuana-tomas-castelazo2Families separated by their immigration status sloshed through a muddy trickle of the Rio Grande on Wednesday to embrace at the border between the United States and Mexico. Their reunion was a momentary truce organized by immigrant advocates and supervised by the Border Patrol. Families who came from the United States wore blue T-shirts and their relatives from Mexico wore white T-shirts. They met in the middle of a concrete canal between the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juárez. Francisco Luevano squeezed his mother to his chest for the first time in 15 years. Luevano is an undocumented hotel maintenance worker who lives in Las Cruces, New Mexico. His mother traveled 700 miles from central Mexico to see him for a fleeting three minutes.

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The Trump Effect: Why Mexico’s Image Problem Spells Trouble for the U.S

08/09/16 World Politics Review 

Donald_Trump)During a June 30 campaign stop in New Hampshire, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump pointed to a plane flying overhead and quipped that it could be a Mexican aircraft “getting ready to attack.”

It’s not a small thing for the potential future U.S. president to casually suggest that neighboring Mexico is planning to launch an assault, given the close historical, security and commercial ties between the two countries.

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