With an unfriendly neighbour, Mexico needs to strengthen itself

The Economist 11/26/16 

us mex flagALMOST 25 years ago a Mexican president, Carlos Salinas, took a historic decision. He decreed that his country’s future lay in setting aside its fear and resentment of its mighty neighbour to the north and embracing economic integration with the United States through the North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The agreement underpinned the modernisation of part of Mexico’s economy. So the imminent arrival in the White House of Donald Trump, a critic of NAFTA who threatens to build a migrant-blocking wall between the two countries, looks like a disaster for Mexico.

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Trump win churns U.S.-Mexico water talks

Politico 11/26/16

colorado riverNegotiations between the U.S. and Mexico to seal a water-sharing deal over the dwindling supplies on the Colorado River are confronting a new deadline: the inauguration of Donald Trump.

A 16-year drought has sent water levels at the river’s most important reservoir, Lake Mead, to their lowest point since it was first filled in the 1930s, threatening supply cuts for 40 million people across seven U.S. states and two Mexican states. It’s also raising the stakes for the two countries as they try to hammer out an extension of a four-year-old agreement on how to share the water.

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VIDEO | What Does the World Expect of President-elect Trump: Mexico

Director Duncan Wood discusses what Mexico expects of President-elect Donald Trump.

what-does-world-expect-of-trump

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READ THE ANALYSIS

WEBCAST TOMORROW: What Does the World Expect of President-elect Donald Trump?

white_house_1500.jpgWHEN: November 15, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Watch via Webcast

Watch the live webcast on TwitterFacebook, or on wilsoncenter.org. Tweet the panel your questions @TheWilsonCenter or post them on our Facebook page during the event.

The next U.S. Administration faces  a complicated, volatile world.

Join us for spirited conversation about the foreign policy expectations and challenges confronting the next President of the United States with distinguished Wilson Center experts on Mexico, Russia, China, the Middle East, Latin America and more.

Introduction

The Honorable Jane Harman
Director, President and CEO, Wilson Center

Speakers

Cynthia J. Arnson
Director, Latin American Program, Wilson Center

Robert Daly
Director, Kissinger Institute on China and the United States, Wilson Center

Robert S. Litwak
Director, International Security Studies, Wilson Center

Aaron David Miller
Distinguished Fellow, Middle East, Wilson Center

Matthew Rojansky
Director, Kennan Institute, Wilson Center

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Watch via Webcast

 

With Trump Victory, Mexico’s Worst Fears are Realized

11/9/2016 The Washington Post

In America’s modern history, few U.S. presidents have come to power as openly hostile to their southern neighbor as Donald Trump. His opening campaign salvos — describing Mexican immigrants as criminals or rapists — seemed almost tame by the time he clinched victory, after so many threats to cut off jobs going to Mexico, deport millions of unauthorized immigrants and build a wall on the border.

His victory stunned, saddened and worried Mexicans, forcing the country’s highest government officials Wednesday morning to call for calm and pledge to work with the United States. The wave of national anxiety sent financial markets here into turmoil as a new, uncertain era in relations with the United States began.

[…] “I think there will be some tinkering with the U.S. approach to international trade, but I don’t see wholesale reversal of U.S. trade policies. There’s too much at stake here, and any change on that scale would take years and years,” said Duncan Wood, director of the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. “I think we’re looking at the beginnings of a conversation about where we want to be as a country in our international trade relationships. So we’re moving away from a model of free trade and back to a paradigm of managed trade.” […]

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What a Trump Presidency Means for LatAm Organized Crime

11/10/16 InSight Crime

Donald_Trump_August_19,_2015_(cropped)In the wake of Donald Trump’s surprising victory in the US presidential election, InSight Crime considers the impact his administration could have on security and organized crime in Latin America.

Trump will hold the top office alongside a Republican-dominated Congress, as the party maintained a majority in both the Senate and House of Representatives.

Aside from his common refrain of building a wall along the US-Mexico border, Trump rarely touched on topics concerning Latin America during his campaign. This has created a great deal of uncertainty about his position on a host of issues related to the region, and his foreign policy more generally.

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Mexico says does not expect Trump deportation plan to begin soon

11/9/16 Reuters

immigrationDeportations of undocumented Mexican migrants in the United States may start rising when President-elect Donald Trump takes office but the process will not begin soon, Mexico’s deputy interior minister for migration said on Wednesday.

Trump surged to victory early on Wednesday morning after upsetting pollsters’ predictions to beat Democratic rival Hillary Clinton and seize the White House in a campaign that sent the world into uncertainty.

The impact of his win was particularly acute in Mexico, where the beleaguered peso currency fell about 10 percent in the aftermath of the vote.

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