How DACA Helps Curb Teen Pregnancy

04/04/2018 The Atlantic

child_immigrant_cbp_border_gettyDaca, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is the Obama-era policy that allows 1.3 million undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children to stay and work here legally. Those who meet the criteria are protected from deportation for a period of two years, which can be renewed.

The Trump administration plunged this program into a state of uncertainty last September. First, it announced the end of daca, saying the program wouldn’t be accepting new applicants and that everyone would be kicked out of the program starting March 5 of this year. However, a series of temporary court rulings earlier this year blocked the program’s termination, allowing daca recipients to continue to apply for renewals to their status, just as they had under Obama.

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Mexico pledges $4.3 million effort to stop Tijuana spills

03/26/2018 The Washington Post

border usa mexicoMexico is pledging to spend $4.3 million to clean the Tijuana river channel after two California cities sued a U.S. agency over the decades-old problem of sewage fouling U.S. wetlands and beaches.

Mexico’s National Water Commission said Monday it will strengthen and clean overflow channels and drains, to prevent sewage and garbage from flowing into the Pacific near the U.S. border. It also will renovate pumping stations and electrical components to carry the runoff to treatment plants.

The California cities of Imperial Beach and Chula Vista and the Port of San Diego contend the International Boundary and Water Commission’s U.S. section failed to comply with the federal Clean Water Act.

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Tijuana sewage spills have been an environmental problem for decades so what’s the solution?

03/25/2018 The San Diego Union-Tribune

ocean waves and beachThere was not a cloud in sight on this winter morning as surfers rode the waves south of the U.S. border fence, off of Playas de Tijuana. Anna Lucía López Avedoy stood on the street above, focusing instead on the stream pouring from a storm drain, splashing down a small rocky cliff, trickling down the sand and finally into the Pacific Ocean.

“This is not rain water, this is not water that should be running through a storm drain,” said López, a former Tijuana lifeguard who teaches a class in ecology to tourism students at Tijuana’s largest public university, the Autonomous University of Baja California. “I think it’s time we highlight the situation.”

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Mexico approves conscientious objection for doctors

03/23/2018 Washington Post

doctors by Flikr user Gov BaMEXICO CITY — Mexico’s national anti-discrimination council says a proposed law allowing doctors to refuse medical procedures because of conscientious objection threatens patients’ right to treatment.

The measure appears aimed at abortion, which is legal in Mexico City, but outlawed in many other parts of Mexico.

The council said Friday that “Mexico City residents who use federal facilities could have their medical and reproductive rights violated.”

While the bill passed Thursday by the Senate doesn’t mention abortion, opponents say it would endanger women’s right to choose.

The bill says doctors and nurses cannot disciplined for refusing to perform treatments they consider morally or ethically unacceptable.

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Calls for probe of Mexico state pension fund investment after Reuters report

03/14/2018 Reuters

Image result for issste

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – The head of a Mexican congressional committee on Tuesday called for an investigation of an investment by state workers’ pension fund PensionIssste, after Reuters reported it spent millions on shares in a company spiraling toward bankruptcy.

PensionIssste spent around 400 million pesos ($21.5 million) buying the largest stake in builder ICA (ICA.MX), even after its shares had fallen by more than half in the previous year, three people with knowledge of the investment told Reuters.

It stands to lose almost all its investment in a restructuring.

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Mexico Turns To Digital Health To Improve Healthcare

03/13/2018 Forbes

latino-healthMexico is a country with a population of over one hundred and twenty million people. The challenges that this nation faces to grow and develop are enormous, especially in healthcare.  Obesity, diabetes, and heart disease loom large and represent significant public and private health concerns.

The country has one of the lower life expectancy indexes across the OECD, in part due to the limited resources available for health, which impacts all aspects of society. Yet, Mexico is moving to a modern, technologically based solution to this problem: digital health.

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The trade deal that triggered a health crisis in Mexico – in pictures

01/01/2018 The Guardian 

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWhen Mexico signed a free trade agreement with the US and Canada in 1994, it triggered the insidious rise of obesity and malnutrition. At a stroke, Mexico became a tariff-free dumping ground for soft drinks and junk food imported from the US. Today, almost a quarter of a century on, the country has the world’s second highest obesity rate and a growing child malnutrition crisis.

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