Mexico’s soda tax will save 18,900 lives and more than $983 million over 10 years, study says


11/4/16 Los Angeles Times

imagesA new estimate of the health impact of soda taxes in Mexico sheds some light on what’s at stake in ballot measures coming to a vote in three Bay-area cities and Boulder, Colo. next week. In cases of heart disease and diabetes averted, the model suggests that, in Mexico, those levies are on track to save close to a billion dollars and powerfully improve lives.

After a tandem run-up in consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity, Mexico has become one of the fattest countries on Earth. In 2014, it adopted a 10% excise tax on the sale of sugary drinks.

The beverage producers claimed that soda taxes would do little to reduce consumption. But market surveys show that Mexicans reduced their purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages by an average of 6% in 2014 per household. And by December 2014, that drop in purchases was at 12%.

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Designing babies or saving lives in Mexico?

9/29/16 BBC News

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The headlines earlier this week that a baby had been born using DNA from three people got the world very excited – no more so than in Mexico, where the technique was carried out.

The US team at New Hope Fertility Clinic in New York, led by Dr John Zhang, had to travel to their Mexico clinic in Guadalajara to carry out the procedure, which is effectively banned in the United States. Dr Alejandro Chavez-Badiola heads up the Mexico clinic and worked with Dr Zhang on the procedure. He says the procedure has been misrepresented in the media since the story broke.

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EVENT TOMORROW | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tomorrow, September 27, 2:00-4:00pm

WHERE: Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP.

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP

UPCOMING EVENT | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 2:00-4:00 PM

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP

UPCOMING EVENT | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 2:00-4:00pm

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP.

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP.

Mexican rape victim, 13, refused access to abortion

08/01/16 The Guardian 

Health officials in northern Mexico have refused to authorize an abortion for a 13-year-old girl who was raped by a family acquaintance after a judge downgraded the crime to a charge of sexual coercion.

Abortion is banned in Sonora, apart from in cases of rape. But human rights advocates say the decision violates federal health regulations introduced earlier this year which guarantee rape victims unrestricted access to safe abortion services – regardless of where they live and whether the crime was reported or not.

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PepsiCo, Coca-Cola still sparkle in Mexico after fizzy drinks tax

07/07/16 CNBC

Coca Cola BottlesFlat beverages are helping overall sales at Coca-Cola Co and PepsiCo Inc stay fizzy in Mexico despite a tax on sodas.

As Mexico moved toward implementing a soda tax to combat soaring rates of obesity and diabetes three years ago, the beverage industry fought back hard, warning that sales in the world’s No. 2 consumer of sugary drinks could take a hit.

But more than two years later, PepsiCo and Coca-Cola have found ways to prosper in Mexico thanks to alternative beverages and resilient demand, a Reuters review of corporate filings and executive comments shows.

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