Mexico’s Finance Minister Says He’ll Run for President

11/27/2017 The New York Times

Mexico’s finance minister, José Antonio Meade, stepped down Monday and announced his intention to run for president in next year’s election, assuming the coveted candidacy of the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party.

In recent months, speculation has been rampant about whom the president, Enrique Peña Nieto, and his party would select as the party’s candidate.

The president, who is limited to a single term of six years, has received some of the lowest approval ratings in the country’s recent history amid corruption scandals, record-breaking violence and a sluggish economy — making the selection of a candidate to succeed him a delicate matter.

Read more…

Advertisements

Mexico employers federation pushes for higher minimum wage

10/24/2017 News Observer

The push to raise Mexico’s low wages has gotten some unusual champions.

The Mexican Employers’ Federation said Monday that the minimum wage should be raised 19 percent, to the equivalent of about $5 a day.

And telecom magnate Carlos Slim, Mexico’s richest man, told a business conference that “what has to be done is to substantially increase people’s incomes.” He called for a larger, better-paid middle class to stimulate Mexico’s internal market.

Read more…

Mexico: Mental Health Bill Undermines Disability Rights

10/16/2017 Human Rights Watch

Mexico’s Congressional Mental Health and Drug Commission is considering a national mental health bill that would seriously jeopardize the rights of people with disabilities, Human Rights Watch said today.

In a letter sent on October 16, 2017, to the Commission on Health and Drugs in the Chamber of Deputies, Human Rights Watch urged the commission to reject the bill in its current form. The commission should revise the bill to reflect a human rights-oriented framework, based on consultations with organizations representing people with disabilities and disability rights experts. The final bill should ensure the right to mental health for all in Mexico on an equal basis, and without resort to forced treatment.

“The bill before the commission unfortunately reflects a discredited approach to mental health, focusing on forced medical treatment instead of  on the consent, autonomy and rights of those in need of mental health services,” said Carlos Ríos Espinosa, senior researcher and advocate for disability rights at Human Rights Watch. “The bill is inconsistent with Mexico’s human rights obligations, in particular the right to consent to or refuse treatment, which is an integral aspect of the right to health.”

Read more…

Mexico’s ruling party just totally failed at being cool

10/13/16 The Washington Post 
PRI logoIt was an erstwhile attempt at self-expression in a party known for protocol and staid formalities. A member of the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) posted a defiant rant on Facebook — along with an image of a bearded hipster with thick glasses — listing the challenges of being young and belonging to an organization whose stalwarts are lampooned as dinosaurs.

“Being a young priista (PRI militant) is no easy thing. It’s a fight on twenty fronts,” Rodrigo Escalante wrote Oct. 9 on his Facebook page.

Read more…

Mexico’s push for same-sex marriage might be getting a holy opponent

09/29/2016 Business Insider 

POPEMexico’s conservative movement against same-sex marriage seems to have gained a holy backer.

During last Sunday’s mass at the Vatican, Pope Francis said a few words that are being interpreted by many Mexicans as a show of support for those leading the fight against marriage equality in the Aztec nation.

Read more:

 

EVENT FRIDAY – Book Launch | The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

problem of powerWHEN: Friday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute invites you to a book launch and discussion on Mexico’s political system. Wilson Center Global Fellow Luis Rubio will present his book, The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government. After his presentation, leading analysts will discuss the system of governance and concentration of power in Mexico, as well as policy prescriptions to improve Mexico’s political system.

The Problem of Power is a reflection of the internal and external causes of the weakness of the Mexican political system, as well as an analysis of the opportunities to transform it. As stated in the introduction, the main message of the book is the need to build institutions and strengthen the rule of law based on due process so that government and the political sector in Mexico is more responsive to its citizens’ needs and aspirations and less focused on preserving the benefits inherent in the status quo. This implies a need for the transformation and professionalization of all three branches of government at all three levels, municipal, state and federal.

Download the book (available in both English and Spanish)

Speakers

Luis Rubio
Global Fellow & Advisory Board Member, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center
President, Centro de Investigación para el Desarrollo (CIDAC)

Verónica Ortiz-Ortega
Political Analyst, El Economista and Canal del Congreso

Oliver Azuara
Economics Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

Mexico governor floats idea of medical opium growing to reduce drug violence

3/15/16 Reuters

Afghanistan_16A senior Mexican official has said legalizing cultivation of opium poppies for medicinal purposes might help reduce violence in one of the regions most affected by brutal drug gangs that have ravaged the country for years.

Hector Astudillo, governor of Guerrero, one of the most violent states in Mexico, told Milenio television it was worth at least exploring the possibility of allowing cultivation.

“Let’s do some sort of pilot scheme,” Astudillo, a member of President Enrique Pena Nieto’s Institutional Revolutionary Party, told Milenio in an interview recorded last week but broadcast on Monday.

Read more…