UPCOMING EVENT | Power Play: Energy and Manufacturing in North America

power playWHEN: Tuesday, May 10, 9:00-10:30 AM

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, Canada Institute, and the International Monetary Fund are pleased to invite you to our launch of the book “Power Play: Energy and Manufacturing in North America.” Despite the recent fall in energy prices, fuller development of energy resources in North America has potentially important implications for global energy markets and the competitiveness of North American manufacturing industries. The book “Power Play: Energy and Manufacturing in North America” describes the transformation of the energy landscape in North America due to the upsurge in unconventional energy production since the mid-2000s and tells the story of the energy-manufacturing nexus from the perspective of Canada, Mexico, and the United States, and the region as a whole. Based on the research done at the International Monetary Fund, the book discusses the energy boom and its macroeconomic implications for the three countries individually and for the region overall, exploring also how the changing energy landscape can affect the potential benefits of greater integration across the three North American economies.

Keynote Speaker

Alejandro Werner
Director, Western Hemisphere Department
International Monetary Fund

Additional Speakers

Carlos Hurtado
Alternate Executive Director for Mexico
International Monetary Fund

Jim Prentice
Global Fellow, Canada Institute, Wilson Center
Former Premier of Alberta
Former Minister of the Environment, Canada

Meg Lundsager
Public Policy Fellow, Wilson Center
Former U.S. Executive Director and Alternate Executive Director, International Monetary Fund

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

Mexico launches call for second electricity auction in September

4/29/2016 PV Magazine 

Innovation2CENACE published the call today. Clean Energy Certificates are expected to be auctioned, as well as the possibility of procuring firm power.

Mexico’s Secretariat of Energy (SENER) has approved the call for the second electricity auction following Mexico’s energy reform. The auction will be resolved before the end of September 2016.

The nation’s National Center for Energy Control (CENACE) published the call for the auction today, according to a press release by SENER. Auction of Clean Energy Certificates (CEL) is expected, and there also exists the possibility of an auction for firm capacity.

The publication of the first version of the rules is set for May 13, and the publication of the bids for July 4.

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Mexico Senate names new commissioners to energy regulators

4/28/2016 Reuters

Energy -electricity_transmission_linesMexico’s Senate on Thursday named new commissioners to the country’s two energy regulators and a new independent adviser for national oil company Pemex.

The Senate chose two new commissioners for oil regulator CNH, Hector Moreira and Gaspar Franco. Moreira replaces former commissioner Edgar Rangel, who died suddenly last month.

For Mexico’s energy regulator CRE, the Senate selected Guillermo Garcia Alcocer as president and Luis Guillermo Pineda as a commissioner.

The commissioners were selected from lists of candidates that President Enrique Pena Nieto had sent to the Senate.

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Pemex Turning the tanker

4/23/2016 The Economist 

Oil barrelsTHE radio in the office of José Antonio González is tuned to one of the American classical-music stations that he loves. The sounds may be relaxing, but the firm Mr González has led since February—Pemex, Mexico’s state-owned oil company—is in crisis. On April 13th the Mexican government was forced to respond to the firm’s troubled finances with a 73.5 billion peso ($4.2 billion) aid package and a 50 billion peso tax cut. This week Mr González headed to New York to soothe the fears of banks and rating agencies.

They will take some persuading. Pemex’s crude production fell last year to 2.3m barrels a day, down from a peak of 3.4m in 2004. Next year, says the finance ministry, that will probably fall to 2m—“a disaster”, says Adrián Lajous, a former Pemex chief. After taxes and royalties the company made a loss of 522 billion pesos last year. In March Moody’s cut Pemex’s credit rating by two notches to its lowest investment grade. More bad news followed on April 20th when several workers died in a blast at a Pemex facility.

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BP Results Still Hurt by Gulf of Mexico Spill

4/26/16 Wall Street Journal

BPLONDON— BP PLC’s fatal blowout in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 continues to haunt the company, helping to drag its quarterly earnings into a second consecutive loss and overshadowing the British oil giant’s progress on cost cuts.

BP on Tuesday said its earnings took a $917 million hit in the first quarter related to the Deepwater Horizon explosion that killed 11 workers and caused a massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a disaster that changed the course of the British oil giant and cost the company $56.4 billion to date.

The additional spill costs and the weakest oil prices in over a decade cast a cloud over BP’s financial performance, despite signs that heartened investors and caused the firm’s shares to jump over 4%.

Counting the Deepwater Horizon costs, BP said its equivalent of net earnings was a $485 million quarterly loss. Stripping out those and other one-time charges, BP had a profit of $532 million in the first quarter, significantly beating analysts’ consensus forecast for a loss of $140 million.

The spill forced the company to sell more than $40 billion in assets, pull back its ambitions and craft the business around a smaller set of high-value oil and gas fields.

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Death Toll Rises to 32 in Mexico Petrochemical Plant Blast

4/24/2016 ABC news

GULF of MEXICO - Gas from the damaged Deepwater Horizon wellhead is burned by the drillship Discoverer Enterprise May 16, 2010, in a process known as flaring.  Gas and oil from the wellhead are being brought to the surface via a tube that was placed inside the damaged pipe.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley.
GULF of MEXICO – Gas from the damaged Deepwater Horizon wellhead is burned by the drillship Discoverer Enterprise May 16, 2010, in a process known as flaring. Gas and oil from the wellhead are being brought to the surface via a tube that was placed inside the damaged pipe. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley.

Mexico’s state oil company says that searchers have recovered four more bodies from a petrochemical plant wrecked by a huge explosion on the country’s Gulf coast, raising the death toll to 32.

Petroleos Mexicanos said in a statement Sunday that rescuers with dogs had reached some of the area’s most affected by Wednesday’s blast and had located more bodies. It said all the workers in the plant that day have been located.

The company said more than 130 people in all suffered injuries when the explosion rocked the plant in Coatzacoalcos, 600 kilometers (370 miles) southeast of Mexico City.

Pemex has said the explosion happened after a leak but has not determined the source.

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Mexico’s Pemex puts blast death toll at 24, blames leak

04/21/2016 Reuters

GULF of MEXICO - Gas from the damaged Deepwater Horizon wellhead is burned by the drillship Discoverer Enterprise May 16, 2010, in a process known as flaring.  Gas and oil from the wellhead are being brought to the surface via a tube that was placed inside the damaged pipe.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley.
Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley.

Twenty-four people died after a leak caused a deadly petrochemical plant blast, and the death toll could still rise, Mexican oil giant Pemex said on Thursday, the latest in a series of fatal accidents to batter the company.

Pemex CEO Jose Antonio Gonzalez Anaya, who traveled to the site of Wednesday’s blast near the port of Coatzacoalcos, one of Pemex’s top oil export hubs, told local television it was unclear what caused the accident.

The massive explosion at the facility’s chlorinate 3 plant in the Gulf state of Veracruz also injured 136 people, 13 of them seriously. Another 18 people were unaccounted for, and one badly damaged part of the plant had yet to be scoured.

“We know there was a leak, what we don’t know is why, but everything points to an accident,” Gonzalez Anaya said.

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