Arizona-Mexico trade relationship continues to boost border economies

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12/02/19 – Chamber Business News

By Graham Bosch

Mexico is Arizona’s top trading partner, accounting for about 30 percent of the state’s exports to foreign markets, according to an extensive ongoing study by the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona.

With that in mind, it’s no wonder that business leaders, trade experts and economists agree the cross-border relationship is of the utmost importance to Arizona when it comes to trade, manufacturing, education, safety, tourism and more.

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Officials worried for possible economic impact of violence in Nuevo Laredo

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11/18/19 – KGNS

This weekend’s violence in Nuevo Laredo hit an all-time high with members of drug cartels fighting with Mexican military. Photos of the aftermath immediately began circulating on social media with the Mexican consulate and the City of Laredo issuing travel advisories to its citizens.

This is not the kind of publicity a U.S. border city wants to see, especially those that rely on its neighbors to the south to help boost their economy.

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Mexico’s auto production and exports drop sharply, battered by Ford

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11/06/19 – Reuters

By Julia Love and Sharay Angulo

Mexico’s auto production and exports fell sharply in October compared with the same month last year as production from U.S. automaker Ford Motor Co ground to a halt, according to data from the national statistics agency INEGI.

Auto production declined 16.35%, while exports dropped 19.52%, the data showed.

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GM laying off another 415 workers in Mexico as U.S. strike continues

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10/07/19 – Reuters

By David Shepardsonm

General Motors Co (GM.N) said Monday it is temporarily laying off another 415 workers in Mexico as a strike by 48,000 U.S. hourly workers enters its fourth week.

GM said it had partially idled its Ramos Arizpe propulsion plant, with the V8 engine line and the CVT transmission line not operating. The plant continues to build engines for the Ramos assembly plant, which is still operating, but GM previously laid off 6,000 workers in Mexico at a separate facility in Silao, Mexico.

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GM lays off 6,000 additional workers in Mexico due to UAW strike

 

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10/01/19 – CNBC

By Michael Wayland

General Motors on Tuesday idled a plant in Mexico that produces its highly-profitable Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 1500 pickups, temporarily laying off 6,000 workers.

The automaker said the decision was a result of a parts shortage due to the United Auto Workers union’s strike against GM, now in its 16th day. A GM spokesman said the “primary focus is to get a deal and get everybody back to work” as soon as possible.

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Pence upbeat that Congress will pass USMCA trade deal this year

 

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Vice President Micheal Pence poses for his official portrait at The White House, in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. (Official White House Photo by D. Myles Cullen)

09/18/19 – Reuters

By Andrea Shalal

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday said he believed Congress would act to pass a new U.S.-Mexico-Canada free trade agreement this year, providing important momentum for the U.S. economy.

Pence told a packed audience at the Heritage Foundation think tank that passage of USMCA would create jobs and trigger increased investment in the United States, while helping President Donald Trump reach a trade deal with China.

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Mexico ‘quite positive’ on USMCA ratification, Herrera says

5/7/2019 – Bloomberg

 

Watch the interview here…

U.S. Congress and AMLO may finally force labor reform in Mexico

4/26/2019 – Bloomberg

aerial-aerial-shot-agriculture-1595108By Nacha Cattan

Mrs. Martínez earns $79 for a six-day week working in the produce section of a Walmart in Mexico City. A labor union bargained with the retail giant to get her that salary, but she’s never met a representative. She didn’t want to be named for fear of reprisals, but she says she hasn’t even heard of the union.

“Bargaining” is a stretch to describe what the union actually did, which is more like rubber-stamping. The collective contract that covers Martínez’s store allows starting salaries around the minimum wage, which has fallen so far behind inflation that few in the capital actually work for it. Walmart Inc. pays dues on workers’ behalf.

That’s not how unions are meant to work. But in Mexico they do, and not by accident. Low pay has been central to the country’s economic strategy in the quarter-century since Nafta began, boosting its appeal as a cheap base for exports to the giant consumer market up north. Many businesses that took advantage of cheap Mexican labor were American, turning the wage gap into a bone of contention between the two countries. The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, negotiated last year to replace Nafta, has more worker protections. But U.S. lawmakers—particularly House Democrats—insist on proof that Mexico is finally serious about boosting wages and threaten to block ratification of the deal until they get it. Mexico’s new labor-friendly president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, says he wants an economy that’s more driven by domestic demand anyway, which puts the unions in a political vise.

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Tariff tensions shadow US, Canada, Mexico trade pact signing

11/30/2018 – Washington Post

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Photo: Martin Mejia/Associated Press

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — President Donald Trump teamed up with the leaders of Canada and Mexico on Friday to sign a revised North American trade pact, a deal that fulfills a key political pledge by the American president but faces an uncertain future in the U.S. Congress. The celebratory moment was dimmed by ongoing differences over Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs, as well as plans for massive layoffs in the U.S. and Canada by General Motors.

The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement is meant to replace the 24-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement, which Trump has long denigrated as a “disaster.”

Trump appeared with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and outgoing Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto at the Group of 20 nations summit in Buenos Aires for the formal signing ceremony. Each country’s legislature must also approve the agreement.

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The Latest: Trump Praises Outgoing Mexican President

11/30/2018 – New York Times

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BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — The Latest on President Donald Trump at the Group of 20 summit (all times local):

10:50 a.m.

President Donald Trump is praising Mexico’s outgoing President Enrique Pena Nieto, whose government has been a target of Trump’s ire over trade, migration and Trump’s proposed wall on the U.S. southern border.

Trump has railed about factory jobs lost to Mexico and the U.S. trade deficit with its southern neighbor — two hot-button issues that vexed relations with Nieto.

But on Friday, Trump lauded Pena Nieto as a “special man.”

Trump congratulated Pena Nieto on ending his presidency by signing the new agreement governing trade relations among the United States, Mexico and Canada.

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