5 facts about Mexico and immigration to the U.S.

2/11/2016 Pew Research Center

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants participate in march for Immigrants and Mexicans protesting against Illegal Immigration reform by U.S. Congress, Los Angeles, CA, May 1, 200Pope Francis is expected to make immigration a major theme of his visit to Mexico. By traveling northward across Mexico, he intends to symbolically retrace the journey of Mexican and Central American migrants traveling to the United States. After the pope leaves Mexico City, his route will begin in the southern state of Chiapas, which shares a long border with Guatemala, and end in Ciudad Juárez, located across the U.S.-Mexico border from El Paso, Texas, a longtime entry point to the U.S.

U.S. immigration from Latin America has shifted over the past two decades. From 1965 to 2015, more than 16 million Mexicans migrated to the U.S. in one of the largest mass migrations in modern history. But over the past decade, Mexican migration to the U.S. has slowed dramatically. Today, Mexico increasingly serves as a land bridge for Central American immigrants traveling to the U.S.

Read more…

Step by Step on a Desperate Trek by Migrants Through Mexico

2/8/2015 New York Times

ARRIAGA, Mexico — The police truck appeared suddenly, a glint of metal and glass. The migrants broke into a sprint, tripping over cracked pavement as an older woman sweeping her stoop urged them to hurry.

The 10 men rounded the corner and hid behind a row of low-slung trees. Four days into their journey from Central America, the new reality onMexico’s southern border was setting in: Under pressure from the United States, the Mexican authorities were cracking down.

Minutes passed. The men fanned out and doubled over to catch their breath. Along the tree line, a man approached, wearing flip-flops and a collared shirt. He told them not to worry — he knew the way north.

Small, with jaundiced eyes, he was practiced in the art of smuggling. He could spot patrols, flag down vehicles for rides, even navigate the hidden trails carved into the lush countryside. They could trust him, he promised. He just wanted to help.

Read more…

Former Mexican President: We’re Not Paying for a ‘Stupid’ Wall

2/09/16 NBC News

6228163370_c4a0fca92a_q
Felipe Calderón

 

A former Mexican president had some tough words when asked about GOP candidate Donald Trump’s much-touted plan to build a border wall that he says will be paid for by Mexico.”We are not going to pay any single cent for such a stupid wall! And it’s going to be completely useless,” said former Mexican president Felipe Calderón when asked about this at the AmCham Egypt for Business Conference on Sunday.

“We are not going to pay any single cent for such a stupid wall! And it’s going to be completely useless,” said former Mexican president Felipe Calderón when asked about this at the AmCham Egypt for Business Conference on Sunday.

Calderón had harsh words about the Republican presidential race during his conversation with CNBC’s Hadley Gamble, saying it was “incredible” that quite an “admirable society” like the U.S. had candidates like Trump.

Read More…

Is Mexico The Top Destination For Expats Living In Latin America?

2/4/2016 Forbes

mexico-flagOver the last few years Mexico has emerged as a major hub of in-migration for professionals from the U.S., the UK, Spain, India, and China. According to HSBC’s 2015 Expat Survey, Mexico is the best place in Latin America for expat professionals looking to live abroad. Overall Mexico ranks 19th in the survey, well ahead of Argentina (35th) and Brazil (39th). Mexico is only three spots behind the U.S. (16th overall) in HSBC’s ranking. Mexico scores particularly well in the “Experience” category (9th overall) with top marks for culture and ease of integration. Overall Mexico ties for second place for ease of making friends. Nearly 4 in 5 survey respondents say they enjoy socializing with locals and 82% of respondents report enjoying cooking and eating Mexican cuisine.

Mexico’s economy is deeply divided but it offers far more opportunities for well-educated foreign-born professionals than locals born in poor, rural areas.

Read more…

Mexico Got More Money from Remittances Than from Oil Revenues in 2015

3/3/2016 NBC News

energy - oil_rigMexico’s central bank reported Mexicans overseas sent nearly $24.8 billion home in 2015, overtaking oil revenues for the first time as a source of foreign income.

Remittances were up 4.75 percent from 2014 when they totaled $23.6 billion, the Bank of Mexico said. They had never before surpassed petroleum since the Bank of Mexico began tracking them in 1995.

Analysts pointed to slumping global prices for oil, which earned Mexico $23.4 billion in 2015, and improved economic conditions in the United States, home to more than 11 million Mexicans and the source of nearly all Mexico’s remittances.

Read more…

DACA Recipient Deported After Visiting Mexico

2/2/2016 The Huffington Post

flag waving 2Authorities in Chicago deported an undocumented woman to Mexico — even after she obtained permission to remain in the United States and travel to her native country, activists and her attorney say.

While immigration authorities insist Lesly Sophia Cortez-Martinez, 32, wasn’t eligible to re-enter the United States, her case highlights the tenuous nature of the deportation relief the Obama administration has extended to hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants since 2012.

Having lived in the U.S. since age 15, Cortez-Martinez was approved for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, which shields many people who arrived in the country as minors from deportation.

She had been expelled twice before, in 1999 and again in 2004, but those removals hadn’t interfered with her DACA application, according to her lawyer, Mony Ruiz-Velasco.

Read more…

Immigration at Center of Pope’s Visit to Mexico-US Border

1/27/2016 ABC News
border patrolBy
CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS REYNOSA, Mexico — Jan 27, 2016, 1:05 AM ET 

The young Salvadoran woman was robbed and forced to dodge kidnappers working for a drug cartel during her four-month odyssey to this border city of belching factories and swirling dust across the Rio Grande from Texas.

She hoped to be on the other side long before Pope Francis visits the region next month and delivers what promises to be a highly symbolic homily addressing immigration. Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims will flock to the border to hear him speak, and America’s political class will likely be listening as well. Francis’ Feb. 17 Mass in Ciudad Juarez comes just eight days after the New Hampshire primaries, and three before contests in South Carolina and Nevada.

Immigration has been a hot-button campaign issue particularly among Republican hopefuls such as Donald Trump and Ted Cruz, who have taken an increasingly hard line with Trump vowing to deport the more than 11 million immigrants living in the country illegally and Cruz aiming to end birthright citizenship for their U.S.-born children. It is also an issue close to Francis’ heart, and while analysts doubt he will wade too blatantly into the political thicket, his very presence along the border speaking on the issue will turn heads.

Read more…