Immigration Reform 2016: Border Patrol Sees More Undocumented Immigrants Along US Mexico Border In March

4/26/16 International Business Times

Border fenceAfter a dip in the number of migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border over the winter, traffic may be getting busier there. New statistics released by the Border Patrol show a rise in the number of apprehensions in the Southwest last month compared to March 2015.

There were 7,259 more crossings and apprehensions last month compared to February, and 4,452 of the 33,335 apprehensions were members of families crossing together, the agency reported. That rise in crossings, mostly composed of people fleeing Central America via Mexico, follows a controversial push by the administration of President Barack Obama earlier this year in which immigration officials raided homes to deport people living in the country without authorization.

That push did appear to depress migration rates at first, and Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson last month praised the lower February statistics while mentioning the raids explicitly. The Department of Homeland Security released a statement alongside the March statistics, noting that the number is still much lower than March 2014, when there were 49,596 apprehensions.

“The Department of Homeland Security continues to closely monitor current migration trends and is working aggressively to address underlying causes and deter future increases in unauthorized migration, while ensuring that those with legitimate humanitarian claims are afforded the opportunity to seek protection,” a statement read. “We also continue to support broader regional efforts to address the humanitarian situation in Central America.”

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Border Patrol sees increase in number of migrants being detained at Mexico border

4/24/2016 Los Angeles Times

border patrolApprehensions of undocumented migrants at the Mexican border increased last month after dipping during the winter, immigration authorities said, and they’re expected to continue climbing this summer.

Last month, 33,335 people were caught crossing the southern border illegally, 7,259 more than in February, a 28% increase, the Border Patrol said.

Of those, 4,452 were members of families traveling together, 46% more than the month before. Another 4,240 were unaccompanied youth, 37% more than the previous month.

The number of family members caught crossing illegally has nearly tripled compared with this time last year, and the number of unaccompanied children has almost doubled, the figures show.

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Tighter enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border backfired, researchers find

4/20/2016  Princeton University
border patrolThe rapid escalation of border enforcement over the past three decades has backfired as a strategy to control undocumented immigration between Mexico and the United States, according to new research that suggests further militarization of the border is a waste of money.

“Rather than stopping undocumented Mexicans from coming to the U.S., greater enforcement stopped them from going home,” said Douglas Massey, one of the researchers and the Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton.

Advocated by bureaucrats, politicians and pundits, the militarization of the U.S. border with Mexico transformed undocumented Mexican migration from a circular flow of predominantly male workers going to a few states into a settled population of about 11 million in all 50 states, Massey said. From 1986 to 2010, the United States spent $35 billion on border enforcement and the net rate of undocumented population growth doubled, he said.

“By the 1990s border enforcement had become a self-sustaining cycle in which rising apprehensions provided proof of the ongoing ‘illegal invasion’ to justify more resources allocated to border enforcement, which produced more apprehensions, even though the actual number of undocumented migrants seeking entry was not increasing,” Massey said.

The research is detailed in an article, “Why Border Enforcement Backfired,” that was published by the American Journal of Sociology in March. The authors are Massey, Jorge Durand of the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económica in Mexico City and Karen Pren, project manager of the Mexican Migration Project at Princeton’s Office of Population Research.

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Immigrants rush to apply for citizenship in last window before election

4/19/2016 The Chicago Tribune

us mex flagElena and Esteban Salgado have been living in the U.S. for over 30 years. This year, they decided, would be the year they vote.

“We want to become citizens so we can vote against Trump,” Esteban Salgado, 57, said through a Spanish interpreter.

The River Forest couple, originally from Mexico, have had green cards for 20 years, meaning they’ve been eligible for citizenship for 15. They’ve had busy lives: They both work at a Whole Foods Market, and they’ve raised four children in the U.S.

“We never had a chance to become citizens,” Esteban Salgado said.

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Mexico Won’t Be ‘Bullied’ by Trump’s Threat to Fund Border Wall

04/17/2016 Bloomberg

luis videgarayMexican Finance Minister Luis Videgaray called billionaire Donald Trump’s proposal to force the country to pay for a wall along the U.S. border, or face economic consequences if it doesn’t, a kind of diplomatic harassment that’s doomed to fail.

“Mexico will not pay for that wall, not only because it doesn’t make any sense for either Mexico or the U.S. to enter into that type of threat rhetoric, but it’s also a matter of dignity,” Videgaray said Saturday in an interview in Washington. “There’s no way in which Mexico can be bullied into doing such a thing.”

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Americans’ views of immigrants marked by widening partisan, generational divides

4/15/2016 Pew Research Center

Pew_Research_Center_logoRepublicans and Democrats continue to disagree deeply over immigration policies, including how to deal with undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. and whether to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Underlying these differences is a substantial – and growing – partisan divide over whether immigrants generally are a strength or burden on the country.

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Apprehensions of Mexican migrants at U.S. borders reach near-historic low

4/14/2016 Pew Research Center

Pew_Research_Center_logoThe number of Mexican migrants apprehended at U.S. borders in fiscal 2015 dropped to the lowest levels in nearly 50 years, according to U.S. Border Patrol data. This change comes after a period in which net migration of Mexicans to the U.S. had fallen to lows not seen since the 1940s.

This decline in apprehensions coincides with recently released estimates by Mexico’s top statistical agency, which show that the rate at which Mexicans migrated to the U.S. and other countries – including both legal and unauthorized immigrants – has held steady for the past five years, after a dramatic drop during the Great Recession.

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