Mexico watchdog says migrants overcrowded, no masks or medicine

07/07/2021

Source: Reuters

Mexico’s human rights commission (CNDH) has accused migration authorities of keeping nearly 90 people in overcrowded facilities, without providing masks to protect them against COVID-19 or medicines for epilepsy and diabetes.

The CNDH said 88 migrants are being kept under leaky roofs at a detention center designed to house only 30 people, run by the National Migration Institute (INM) in the northern city of Saltillo in Coahuila state. It also said worms had been spotted in the food.

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Migrants held in filthy conditions in Mexico border town

07/02/2021

Source: KVOA Tucson

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico’s governmental human rights commission says migrants have been detained in filthy conditions in the border town of Piedras Negras, across from Eagle Pass, Texas.

The commission described visiting a municipal police facility where there was sewage, blocked toilets, rats and a horrendous smell in some cells. The commission said Thursday it found 13 migrants in the facility; while it did not list their nationalities, most migrants detained in Mexico are from Central America.

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2-year-old among 100 migrants abandoned in semitrailer in Veracruz

06/29/2021

Source: Mexico News Daily

A boy believed to be two years old was among more than 100 migrants abandoned on a highway in southern Veracruz on Monday after traveling in suffocating conditions in a semitrailer, the National Immigration Institute (INM) announced.

A man traveling in the trailer that was transporting the migrants on the highway between Ocozocoautla, Chiapas, and Las Choapas, Veracruz, was found dead at the same location, having apparently suffocated in the crowded vehicle.

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Nearly 3,300 Migrants Stranded in Mexico Were Kidnapped, Raped or Assaulted – Report

06/22/2021

Source: US News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Nearly 3,300 migrants stranded in Mexico since January due to a U.S. border policy have been kidnapped, raped, trafficked or assaulted, according to a report by a human rights group released on Tuesday.

The report, by New York-based Human Rights First, documents cases of migrants and asylum seekers stuck in Mexico since U.S. President Joe Biden took office on Jan. 20. The number of cases has jumped in recent weeks from roughly 500 such incidents logged in April to 3,300 by mid-June.

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Why some people are moving from the United States to Mexico

06/21/2021

Source: The Economist

In the year and a half since Annette and Mike Thompson sold their house in Texas and upped sticks for Mexico, they have had few regrets. Now they live in Ajijic, a pretty town by Lake Chapala in the western state of Jalisco. Their large house has a spectacular view over the water, where birds glide in the late afternoon breeze. “The only thing we miss is Tex-Mex food,” says Mrs Thompson.

The clichéd view of Mexico is that it is poor and crime-ridden. Popular tv series, such as “Narcos: Mexico”, do little to dispel this image. The reality has long been more nuanced, as more Americans are realising. The us State Department reckons 1.5m live south of the border, making them the largest group of immigrants in Mexico and the largest group of Americans outside the United States (Mexico counts fewer: around 800,000). The largest single community of non-military American expats in the world is in Mexico’s west, close to Guadalajara.

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Migration at US-Mexico border still high, despite Biden’s efforts

06/10/2021

Source: Aljazeera

The number of migrants arriving in the United States through its southern border with Mexico remained high during the month of May, despite sustained diplomatic efforts by the Biden administration to stem the surge.

According to statistics published by the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP), 180,034 people were apprehended along the US-Mexico border in May, up slightly from 178,622 the previous month.

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Haitians in Mexico see bleak choices as they seek protection

06/07/2021

Source: AP

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico (AP) — Adrián is trying to settle in to his third new city since 2016, when his wife was raped and mother was killed in Haiti. He will go anywhere but home.

“Why do they send us back to Haiti?” he said outside a cheap Mexican hotel blocks from the border with El Paso, Texas, where he was living with his wife and about 20 other Haitians last month. “We don’t have anything there. There’s no security. … I need a solution to not be sent back to my country.”

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Why Roma migrants from Europe are taking rafts from Mexico to enter the U.S.

05/26/2021

Source: Reuters

Among the hundreds of Central American migrants crossing the Rio Grande river daily on rafts from Mexico to Texas, dozens stood out on a recent day. They were generally taller and some wore skirts, stylish shoes and tracksuits, while many of the other migrants wore T-shirts, pants and jeans.

U.S. border patrol officers who apprehended them near the river tried to speak to them in Spanish. There was a pause as some of the border crossers explained in broken English that they were Romanians, a Reuters photographer said.

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Mexico faces crisis of migrant children and families, with little housing and few resources

05/17/2021

Source: Los Angeles Times

After a weeks-long trip from her native Honduras, Juana Cruz Funez couldn’t understand why she and her daughter, Itzy, 8, had been denied their goal — entry into the United States.

“I heard people could stay in America if we came with our children,” a sobbing Cruz said moments after the U.S. Border Patrol expelled mother and child back across the Rio Grande to this Mexican border city.

Cruz, 40, and her daughter were among the ranks of hundreds of migrants, almost all Central Americans — mostly women and children — squatting in a public square a block from the Rio Grande here.

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Kidnapping, onerous fees: Central Americans returned to Mexico are targets for abuse, violence

05/17/2021

Source: NBC News

REYNOSA, Mexico — Thousands of migrants who have been returned by the United States to Reynosa, one of the most dangerous cities in Mexico, spend hours in tents and benches — their money gone and easy prey for human traffickers. 

The thousands of dollars they paid to travel to the U.S. border vanished upon arrival, several Central American women say, as they tell their stories amid the dust and heat in this Mexican town.

The women share something in common. After crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, the Biden administration returned them to Mexico in a matter of hours under Title 42, a measure implemented under former President Donald Trump, citing the need to block the spread of Covid-19.

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