Open city

08/20/16 The Economist

LGBT Rights Mexico.JPGOMAR GARCÍA CERVANTES, an aspiring novelist, was brought up in the state of Veracruz but moved to Mexico City 16 years ago. As a gay man, he is happier there than anywhere else. Mexico City has grown only more welcoming since he moved there. In November last year the mayor, Miguel Ángel Mancera, signed a declaration proclaiming its gay-friendliness. Gay marriage has been legal in the city since 2010; under a law passed in 2014, people can change their legal sex simply by applying to alter their birth records. Hate crimes against gays are almost unheard of, says Alejandro Brito of Letra S, a gay-rights activist group.

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Explaining Mexico’s Consumer Paradox

08/24/16 The Huffington Post 

Pesos by Flickr user AleiexThe disassociation between consumer confidence and consumer spending habits over the past two years has been one of the Mexico’s most interesting economic puzzles. The economy remains stuck in a three-year slowdown (GDP contracted in the second quarter by a sequential 0.3%), tighter fiscal and monetary conditions are in place as a result of low oil prices and a weak peso, and the string of corruption and impunity scandals surrounding the political class (and particularly the ruling PRI) appears to have no end in sight, even despite the passage of anti-corruption legislation.

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Mexico to ban gasoline oxygenated with ethanol in three urban centers

08/24/16 Reuters

Mexico-pollutionMexico will ban the sale of gasoline oxygenated with ethanol beginning in late October in three major urban centers as part of a push to combat the worst pollution in over a decade due to high concentrations of ozone in the atmosphere, government officials say.

While Mexico opened to the door to such imports in April, such a blend of ethanol and gasoline is not yet present in the Mexican market. State oil company Pemex says it neither produces nor imports gasoline oxygenated with ethanol.

 

What’s next for Mexico’s drug cartels after El Chapo

08/25/16 CNN

el chapo
Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán

(CNN)As Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman awaits extradition to the United States, he leaves behind what appears to be a new landscape for Mexico’s drug cartels.

Last week, his son, Jesus Alfredo Guzman, was kidnapped by men authorities believe were members of a rival cartel. Sources tell CNN he was released Saturday, but his abduction signals that the game of thrones for Mexico’s next top drug cartel has already begun.

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Arrest of Alleged Cartel Operative Shows Mexico Drug Interests in Spain

08/24/16 InSight Crime

crime and drugsAn investigation by Spanish authorities has uncovered an alleged cocaine trafficking network headed by a Mexican citizen linked to several different drug cartels, shedding light on the “franchise model” Mexican crime groups use to traffic drugs to Europe.

On August 23, EFE reported it had obtained access to a Spanish police report alleging Juan Manuel Muñoz Luévano — also known by the aliases “El Mono” and “El Ingeniero” — headed a trafficking ring that brought cocaine into Spain through the port of Valencia, Spain’s second busiest seaport and the sixth busiest in Europe.

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Michelin starts construction of its 69th plant in Central Mexico

08/24/2016 Economic Times

Industrial PlantGlobal Tyre manufacturer, Michelin Group has begun construction of its 69th global plant yesterday with an official ground-breaking and traditional first stone ceremony held with honored government dignitaries, key customers and company leaders at the new site in Leon, Guanajuato, in central Mexico.

“Our actions here today demonstrate our confidence in Mexico’s manufacturing environment, the skilled and talented workforce here and the infrastructure necessary to deliver tires efficiently throughout North America,” said Jean-Dominique Senard, chief executive officer of Michelin Group, based in Clermont-Ferrand, France.

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Donald Trump’s immigration policy: Then and now

08/23/2016 CNN

immigrationAustin, Texas (CNN)Donald Trump launched his presidential campaign by promising to build a “great, great wall” on the US southern border — and make Mexico pay for it — while painting undocumented Mexican immigrants as criminals and rapists.

More than a year later, Trump, now the Republican nominee, is preparing to wade back into the heated immigration debate. This time, though, he appears poised to lay out a more nuanced immigration policy — one that could roll back some of the unapologetically blunt proposals that helped carry him to victory in the GOP primaries.