Ex-Mexican Cartel Leader Gets 30 Years Prison in US

July 1, 2015

07/01/15 ABC News

Photo by Andrew Bardwell from Cleveland, Ohio, USA, WikiCommonsA former leader of Mexico’s notorious Gulf drug cartel has been sentenced to 30 years in a U.S. prison and fined $100 million. Juan Francisco Saenz-Tamez was sentenced Tuesday by a judge in Beaumont, Texas, on drug and money laundering convictions. Saenz-Tamez is a 23-year-old resident of the Mexican border state of Tamaulipas (tahm-uh-LEE’-puhs). He was arrested in October during a shopping trip to Texas.

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Mexico Moving Forward With Major Natural Gas Pipeline

July 1, 2015

07/01/15 Reuters Africa

oil pipeline150On June 22, Mexico’s Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) announced it would tender a new round of 24 energy infrastructure projects totaling $10 billion, including a $3 billion underwater pipeline bringing U.S. natural gas from Texas to Tuxpan, Veracruz. Amidst a grand national “gasification” strategy that has promoted Mexican imports of U.S. natural gas, this may be one of the most ambitious projects yet.

Of course there are concerns around potential risks associated with the project – whether there is the local capacity to carry it out, and whether it’s really necessary – all of which must be resolved if the pipeline is to begin transporting the proposed 2.6 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day by 2018.

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Mapping Mexico’s deadly drug war

July 1, 2015

07/01/15 Science

mexican drugsOn 11 December 2006, former Mexican President Felipe Calderón deployed troops to fight the country’s increasingly powerful drug cartels, plunging Mexico into a war in which more than 100,000 people have been killed or disappeared. Now, a new study uses statistics and complex networks analysis to reveal the patterns by which violence spread across the country between 2007 and 2011—the last year for which records are available. The results may contribute to the debate about how effective the government’s policy of attacking cartel leaders has been in reducing violence, experts say.

This approach “represents an attempt to reveal the actual dynamics of drug violence [and demonstrates] how the conflict actually unfolds and evolves,” says Michael Lawrence, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Waterloo in Canada, whose work has focused on the application of complexity science to issues of conflict and security and who was not involved in the research.

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Coca-Cola And Pepsi Face Serious Security Problems In Guerrero Mexico

July 1, 2015

07/01/15 Forbes

guerreroNine months after the disappearance of 43 students in the town of Iguala in southwestern Mexico, Coca-Cola KO -0.43% has decided to shutter its facility in the nearby municipality of Arcelia, due to ongoing security problems. As I explained in a recent article for Fusion, “Citing concerns for the safety of its employees, Coca-Cola has decided to permanently shutter a storage facility in Arcelia, Guerrero, laying off 120 workers and eliminating one of the few sources of formal-sector jobs in the area.” Guerrero, the state where Iguala is located, presents a unique security challenge for multi-national companies due to high levels of poverty, low levels of development, and the presence of a noxious mix of organized crime groups, armed citizens militias, and militant student organizations.

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Water Scarcity Could Deter Energy Developers From Crossing Border Into Northern Mexico

June 30, 2015
In one conservation effort near Cuatro Cienegas, a  pool named Poza Escobedo, on the property of cattle rancher Alfonzo Gonzalez, was restored to its original state, leading the area around it to regenerate its humidity and lush flora and fauna.

In one conservation effort near Cuatro Cienegas, a pool named Poza Escobedo, on the property of cattle rancher Alfonzo Gonzalez, was restored to its original state, leading the area around it to regenerate its humidity and lush flora and fauna.

Day 5 of our on-going article excerpts. Check out the blog again tomorrow for more, or head straight to our website for the remainder of the article.

Water Scarcity Could Deter Energy Developers From Crossing Border Into Northern Mexico

by Keith Schneider

A Desert Oasis That is Drying

There is virtually no surface water available in this part of the Chihuahuan Desert, an expanse of thin pads of grama grass and stands of creosote bushes and mesquite. Coahuila receives little more than 300 millimeters of rain annually (12 inches), according to Conagua. It is the second driest place in Mexico and ranks with Egypt and the Arabian Gulf as among the driest places on Earth.

That is what makes the running streams and desert marshes of Cuatro Ciénegas, a half days’ drive south of Piedras Negras, so rare and such a valuable reference for the ecological disruption and economic dislocation that can occur with mistakes in water supply and use. Until three decades ago the 215-year-old farming community was a farm and business hub set amid a thriving oasis where vineyards and orchards of pomegranate, walnuts, and peaches were irrigated with water drawn from clear, spring-fed streams and pools.

In one conservation effort near Cuatro Ciénegas, a  pool was restored, leading to the recovery of riparian vegetation. Despite management oversight since the mid-1990s by Mexico’s national parks agency and designation as an international biosphere reserve, Cuatro Ciénegas is steadily drying up. Photo © Janet Jarman/Circle of Blue.

Outside town, thick stands of marsh grasses grew as tall as a man. In the 1960s, Mexican and American biologists and ecologists began to swarm across the 150,000 hectares (370,000 acres) of desert pools and wetlands, discovering a biological treasure of plants and animals so abundant and distinctive they likened Cuatro Ciénegas to the Galapagos Islands.

Today, despite management oversight since the mid-1990s by Mexico’s national parks agency and designation as an international biosphere reserve, Cuatro Ciénegas is steadily drying up. Vinos Vitali, a winemaker and lifelong resident, told a University of Texas video team, “There used to be a lot of water here and a lot of fruit. Now there’s no water and nothing is left.”

Alfonso Gonzalez, a rancher in town, added, “You’re seeing a crisis now because the water has not been sustainably managed.”


Amazon Launches Full Retail Operations In Mexico

June 30, 2015

06/30/15 TechCrunch

amazon_topicAmazon today formally announced its expansion into physical goods sales in Mexico. The company had previously only offered Kindle e-books on its online site which opened for Mexican customers in 2013. Today on Amazon.com.mx, Amazon will introduce a Spanish-language site featuring millions of items including consumer electronics, kitchen and home items, sports equipment, tools, baby, health and personal care products, jewelry, music, books, movies, software and more.

The company is also launching its online selling service for Mexican businesses and sellers as well as its Fulfillment by Amazon service.

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King invites Mexico to use “vast potential” of relations with Spain

June 30, 2015

06/30/15 Fox News Latino

spain mexicoKing Felipe invited Mexico on Monday to take advantage of “the vitality and vast potential” of its relations with Spain, in order to strengthen ties that go beyond the spheres of politics and trade.

Felipe VI delivered that message to Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto on the first day of his state visit to Mexico, together with Queen Letizia.

Peña Nieto, accompanied by first lady Angelica Rivera, welcomed them at a very solemn event.

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