US Treasury Adds Sinaloa Cartel’s ‘King Midas’ to Kingpin List

08/22/16 InSight Crime

The US Treasury Department has placed two high-level Sinaloa Cartel associates on its “kingpin” list, calling the move a “strategic blow” to Mexico‘s most powerful drug trafficking organization even as it appears to be confronting a new threat from a rival cartel.

On August 16, the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) designated Mexican nationals Juan Manuel Alvarez Inzunza, alias “King Midas,” and Jose Olivas Chaidez, alias “El Blanco,” as Specially Designated Narcotics Traffickers, becoming the latest Sinaloa Cartel operatives added to the so-called “kingpin” list.

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Sons of Mexico Drug Lord Freed After Kidnapping

08/22/16 InSight Crime 

el chapo
Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán

Two sons of Sinaloa Cartel boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzmán, allegedly kidnapped from a restaurant in Jalisco by rivals, have been released unharmed after secret negotiations.There is still uncertainty surrounding the incident as well as the implications forMexico‘s underworld.

The director of respected Sinaloa news outlet RioDoce stated that Alfredo and Ivan Guzmán had been abducted and both have now been released, El Universal reported.  Authorities had not even been able to confirm that Iván was kidnapped.

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The world’s most powerful drug lord may be headed back to a prison he’s already broken out of

08/19/16 Business Insider 

elchapoA little over three months after arriving at a prison near the US border, Sinaloa cartel kingpin Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán is to be sent back to Altiplano prison in central Mexico, where he pulled off a brazen escape in July 2015.

A federal judge in Mexico’s Chihuahua state ruled on August 17 that prison officials had transferred Guzmán in May without authorization.

The decision came in response to injunction 384/2016, filed by Guzmán’s legal team.

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Grainy footage appears to capture kidnapping of son of Mexican cartel leader ‘El Chapo’

08/18/16 Los Angeles Times 

Grainy footage aired on Mexican media appears to capture in cinematic fashion the moment when gunmen stormed an upscale restaurant and kidnapped six men — including Jesus Alfredo Guzman Salazar, a son of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, the imprisoned head of the Sinaloa cartel.

The website of  Mexican news outlet El Universal late Wednesday posted the silent footage, apparently taken from security cameras at the targeted La Leche restaurant in the coastal resort city of Puerto Vallarta.

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Mexican police accused of cover-up after killing 22 cartel suspects

08/19/16 The Guardian

policemanMexico’s federal police killed 22 people on a ranch in the western state of Michoacán last year then moved the bodies and planted guns to corroborate the official account that the deaths happened in a gun battle, the country’s human rights commission has alleged.

One police officer was killed in the confrontation on 22 May 2015. The government has said the dead were drug cartel suspects who were hiding out on the ranch in Tanhuato, near the border with Jalisco state.

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‘El Mencho’ Targeting Weakened ‘El Chapo’ in Mexico Drug Battle?

08/18/16 InSight Crime 

Authorities in Mexico have confirmed the CJNG drug trafficking group was responsible for the recent kidnapping of the son of the Sinaloa Cartel‘s incarcerated leader, Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, an indication the CJNG’s top boss may be looking to supplant the fallen kingpin.

El Chapo’s son, Alfredo Guzman, and six others were kidnapped from an upscale restaurant on August 15 in Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco.

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Mexico’s most notorious drug cartels

08/18/16 CNN

HE_Enrique_Peña_Nieto,_President_of_Mexico_(9085212846)Beheadings, mass executions, public hangings and torture — it’s all part of the massive drug war next door.

Mexico’s drug wars have claimed more than 80,000 lives between 2006 and 2015, according to analyst estimates in the 2015 Congressional Research Service report.
Fierce rivalries between Mexico’s drug cartels have wreaked havoc on the lives of civilians who have nothing to do with the drug trade. Bystanders, people who refused to join cartels, migrants, journalists and government officials have been killed.