Mexico’s only indigenous prison is free from drugs, rape, and corruption

07/21/16 Vice News 

Mexican Prison by Flickr user DexterPerrin find link to picThe prisoner, who comes from the Rarámuri indigenous group, says the trouble began at a traditional festival that involved downing considerable amounts of the corn-based spirit called tesgüino.

“My cousin arrived at 4am with a caliber 22 gun and began walking towards me,” he recalled, asking that his name not be used. “When I felt the bullets inside my body and all the desperation, I turned around and placed a bullet in his forehead. My cousin fell down onto the flames and I pulled him away so he would not get burned. I told another cousin to give word to the sheriff.”

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Mexico & the United States: Let’s Build Prosperity & Security

By Earl Anthony Wayne and Sergio M. Alcocer

12642332434_f5a427c4ea_zPresident Obama will receive Mexico’s President Enrique Peña Nieto July 22 in Washington.  This is a critical opportunity to highlight the importance of U.S.-Mexico ties, to underscore the substantial progress in cooperation, and to accentuate how the campaign rhetoric in the United States is out of tune with the reality of relations.  With the U.S. election approaching, it is crucial to take steps to preserve the unprecedented U.S.-Mexico collaboration that exists today.

U.S.-Mexico relations touch the daily lives of more citizens of both countries than do ties with any other country in the world.  Over 30 million U.S. citizens of Mexican heritage, our interconnected economies, the 1,990-mile border and our shared environment link us uniquely.  The two governments have established a comprehensive network of mechanisms that put bilateral relations in the best place they have been in memory.  Officials work together to take advantage of mutual opportunities and to solve shared problems across a wide spectrum of issues, with input from “stakeholders” in the relationship.

There is still a lot of serious work to do to address the problems out there and to take advantage of the opportunities of the region.   Each government has experienced professional ambassadors and teams in place to help guide the work during the U.S. leadership transition.  But, simplistic explanations of the problems or solutions distract us from the good work underway and the hard work still needed to deal with the serious challenges ahead.  As the United States prepares for a presidential transition, the two countries should solidify the mechanisms and engagements that are doing the hard, policy and technical work of enhancing both of our nations’ economic and national security.  These include the High-Level Economic Dialogue (HLED), the 21st Century Border process, the bilateral Security Coordination Group, and the Bilateral Forum on Higher Education, Innovation and Research (FOBESSII).  The U.S.-Mexico relationship is too important for both countries not to continue this work.

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Mexico Institute Materials on Anti-Corruption Efforts

Security and the Rule of LawOn Monday, as President Enrique Peña Nieto signed into law a new anti-corruption system, he apologized for a damaging conflict of interest scandal in 2014 surrounding his wife’s purchase of a $7m luxury home from a government contractor, an episode that hurt the Mexican people’s faith in the presidency and the government. “For this reason, with all humility I ask your forgiveness,” he said. “I reiterate my sincere and profound apology for the offense and indignation I have caused you.”

In light of the ratification of the anti-corruption reform, I would like to share with you our recent work on anti-corruption efforts in Mexico.

Sincerely,

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute

Anti-Corruption

Mexico Wins: Anti-Corruption Reform Approved

Fighting Corruption in Mexico

Mexico Today: Analyzing the Country’s Reforms

Mexico’s Reforms and the Prospects for Growth

Mexican Civil Society’s Battle against Corruption: #Ley3de3

Mexico: The Fight Against Corruption

How to Make Mexico More Competitive: More Corporate Ethics & State Efficiency, Less Corruption

Mexico’s Battle Against Corruption

Mexico Corruption Perception Index 2015

Corruption, A Central Issue in the Campaigns

The Mexican State and Anti-Corruption Efforts

Additionally, check out our recent work on rule of law in Mexico.

The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

Book Launch | The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

Mexico and the United States: Combating Illicit Finance Together

Mexico Security Review 2016: Assessing the Outlook for the Rule of Law

A Mexican Utopia: Book Launch & Discussion of the Rule of Law in Mexico

A Mexican Utopia: The Rule of Law is Possible

A Way to Restore Mexico’s Trust Deficit

Four Rule of Law Policies to Make Mexico Grow

The Mexican State and Transparency

The State of Citizen Security in Mexico: 2014 in Review and the Year Ahead

Organized Crime Loopholes Water Down Mexico Justice Reform

06/18/16 InSight Crime 

imagesMexico is currently in the process of implementing historic changes to its criminal justice system, but the planned reforms include due process exceptions in organized crime cases that could undermine the initiative’s intent.

The exceptions, outlined in a new report (pdf) from the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), provide for the use of a controversial measure known as “arraigo,” which means “hold” and is a form of pretrial that allows suspects in organized crime cases to be held without formal charges for up to 80 days.

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Mapping Mexico’s Current Organized Crime Landscape

07/15/16 InSight Crime 

CartelMore than three years into the term of Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto, the Jalisco Cartel – New Generation (CJNG) and Sinaloa Cartel operate in 15 states combined, while the Zetas and the Knights Templar have been reduced to operating in just one apiece.

That is the federal government’s official diagnostic of organized crime at the end of the first semester of 2016. The data, collected by the National Center for Planning, Analysis and Information to Combat Organized Crime within the Attorney General’s Office, were obtained by Animal Político via a freedom of information request.

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Upcoming Event | Taking Stock of Mexico’s Transformation to an Adversarial System of Justice: Accomplishments, Future Challenges, and Lessons Learned since 2008

justice - gavel and bookWHEN: Monday, July 25, 10:00am-1:00pm

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

Mexico recently completed an eight year process that has transformed the federal and state justice systems from an inquisitorial to an adversarial one. This process began in 2008 with the adoption of constitutional and criminal procedural reform and was completed in June 2016. Please join the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute for our conference “Taking Stock of Mexico’s Transformation to an Adversarial System of Justice: Accomplishments, Future Challenges, and Lessons Learned since 2008.

Featuring a Keynote Address by:
The Honorable Arely Gómez Gónzalez
Mexico’s Attorney General

Welcoming Remarks
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne
Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico
Public Policy Fellow, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Followed by an Expert Panel on Mexico’s Transition to an Adversarial Justice System
Layda Negrete
Coordinator, Quality of Justice Project, México Evalúa

Maria Novoa
Centro de Investigación para el Desarrollo, A.C. (CIDAC)

Miguel Sarre, LLM
Professor, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM)

David Shirk
Professor, Director, Mexico in Justice Project, University of San Diego
Global Fellow, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Moderator:
Eric L. Olson
Special Advisor for Security Policy, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center
Associate Director, Latin American Program, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

 

Panama, Mexico Agree to Joint Crime Fighting Effort

07/11/16 InSight Crime 

Panama&MexicoPanama and Mexico signed a series of agreements during a regional security summit in Panama City, highlighting the push in Latin America to foster cooperation between nations in the struggle to combat organized crime.

Panama officials reported that the two countries signed 43 agreements aimed at controlling organized crime on the sidelines the Interpol Americas Regional Conference held in Panama City July 6-8.

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