Headlines from Mexico

February 27, 2015

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1. Jesús Murillo Karim is no longer the Attorney General for Mexico. President Enrique Peña Nieto will be nominating Arely Gómez for the position.

Read More: El Universal, Reforma

2. Mexican Congress has approved an anti-corruption law with 409 votes in favor and 24 votes against.

Read More: El Universal, El Sol de Mexico

3. The leader of the Knights Templar Cartel “La Tuta” was captured in Michoacán.

Read More: Reforma, El Universal

4. Mexico condemns the death of Ruben Garcia Villalpando, whom was shot by police in the United States on February 20th.

Read More: El Universal

5. Silvano Aureoles Conejo will be running for the gubernatorial position in Michoacán.

Read More: El Universal

6. The parents of the 43 students who disappeared from Guerrero are demanding for elections to not be held this year.

Read More: El Universal


Headlines from Mexico

February 20, 2015

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1. Mexico’s Secretary of the Interior Miguel Angel Osorio Chong spoke at the White House Summit to Counter Violent Extremism stating the importance of creating a common front to fight and prevent violent extremism. A total of 60 countries participated in this summit hosted by the State Department.

Read More: El Universal

2. Cemex will invest $30 million to create a new unit called Cemex Energía that will be taking advantage of Mexico’s energy reforms. They expect to launch power projects within the next five years to meet the country’s electricity requirements. Cemex also signed a joint venture agreement with Pattern Energy Group Inc. to expand wind power projects.

Read More: El Universal, La Jornada

3. Pemex has decided to no longer ship usable gasoline through its pipelines after illegal taps rose 70% from 2013 to 2014. According to the data presented, Pemex lost $1.15 billion in the first nine months of 2014.

Read More: El Universal

4. Manuel Medina Mora will be stepping down from his position with Citi, one year after the discovery of the loan scandal between Oceanografia and Citigroup’s local unit Banamex.

Read More: La Jornada

5. Federal authorities have discovered that kidnappers have used social media as a mechanism to set up dates and lure victims.

Read More: El Universal

6. 77 migrants were rescued in the states of Oaxaca and Veracruz after being transported in overcrowded and inhumane conditions by human traffickers.

Read More: El Universal, La Jornada


Headlines from Mexico

February 13, 2015

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1. Experts from Chile, Guatemala, Colombia and Spain will travel to Mexico in March to help with the investigations taking place in Guerrero. Experts were appointed by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on Thursday, February 12th.

Read More: El Universal, La Jornada

2. The Committee on Enforced Disappearances stated the 43 students missing from the Teachers Training School illustrate the challenges by the Mexican state to prevent, investigate and punish enforced disappearances.  The UN asked that the Mexican government find all those who have been subjected to enforced disappearances.

Read More: El Universal, La Jornada

3. A total of 32 people in the United States and Mexico are responsible for running a multi-state money laundering scheme ($100 million). The laundering activities took place throughout Illinois, California, Florida, Kentucky, Georgia, Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, Texas and North Carolina.

Read More: El Universal

4. According to data from the Executive Secretariat of the National Safety System crime rates in the state of Tamaulipas have returned to the levels registered during the Felipe Calderon administration. Murders increased by 30% and sex crimes increased by 10% from 2013 to 2014. Kidnapping has been increasing within the last 5 years.

Read More: El Universal

5. This upcoming February 19th will be the Mexican military’s 101st Anniversary. Many are encouraging a discussion and reflection on the current status of the military after such cases as Tlatlaya.

Read More: La Jornada


Headlines from Mexico

February 6, 2015

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1. Mexico commits to drafting a “General Law on Enforced Disappearances” by June of 2015. Amnesty International has reported that between December 2006 and October 2014 there have been more than 22,000 cases of enforced disappearances in Mexico.

Read More: El Universal

2. A national convention is currently taking place in Ayotzinapa. The parents of the 43 students are asking representatives from 244 social organizations to join their movement in search of the students. Three working groups are currently taking place.

Read More: La Jornada

3. 61 human bodies were found in an abandoned crematorium in Guerrero. Currently there is an investigation taking place and formal autopsies are being performed. Testimonies state that the crematorium had been abandoned for more than seven months.

Read More: El Universal

4. An operation took place in Jalisco where 129 people were rescued from labor and sexual exploitation while working in a clothing factory. Law officials arrested four Korean nationals suspected of being the perpetrators of committing verbal and physical abuses.

Read More: El Universal

5. Investigations are currently taking place after an unmarked vehicle was stealing diesel from a PEMEX pipe. The discovery was made after an emergency call on a leak was reported.

Read More: El Sol de Mexico


Headlines From Mexico

January 23, 2015

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1. Miguel Angel Osorio Chong has announced that General Felipe Gurrola Ramírez will be responsible in overseeing the federal security forces in Michoacán. General Felipe Gurrola Ramírez will be replacing Alfredo Castillo. This comes after a yearlong evaluation on Plan Michoacán.

Read More: La Jornada, El Universal

2. Mexican Military were ambushed early Friday morning during a patrol. Authorities are now trying to find who was responsible for killing two military officials.

Read More: El Universal

3. Felipe Rodríguez Salgado,otherwise known as El Cepillo stated that he received the 43 students from government officials Felipe Flores Velázquez and César Nava González on the night of September 26th.

Read More: La Jornada

4. The Washington Office on Latin America has released a report on the experiences of Mexican unaccompanied children who cross the U.S.-Mexico Border. The report highlights that out of the 17,000 Mexican children in apprehended by the Border Patrol only 4.5% have had an immigration court hearing.

Read More: La Jornada, WOLA

5. The self-defense groups from Guerrero known as the UPOEG – Unión de Pueblos y Organizaciones del Estado de Guerrero are marking their one year anniversary of becoming established. 

Read More: El Universal


Headlines from Mexico

July 28, 2014

 

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  1. Mexico denies asylum to migrant children. In 2013, only 50 out of the 9,893 unaccompanied minors detained could obtain shelter in the country. Approximately a thousand of them have families in Mexico, and the rest, approximately 8,350, have been deported. Activists of several NGOs have pointed out that the legal process the minors have to pass through always favors deportation rather than a detailed analysis of their reasons for migrating. Similarly, minors are detained in installations with low levels of hygiene and are not given the proper care.

Read more from El Universal…

  1. Economic resources are allocated to the neighborhoods from which the violence arises around the country. According to the Secretary of the Interior, neighborhoods with high percentages of young population, early pregnancy, high school dropout rate, and high incidence of crimes, are in risk of developing criminal behavior. For these reasons, the federal government is giving 184 million dollars to 234 of the most violent neighborhoods around the country in order to implement 16 social programs seeking to reverse their reality. Among the entities that have received more resources are Michoacán, Chihuahua, and Guerrero.

Read more from Excelsior…

  1. Final stretch of the Energy Reform. Secondary legislation discussions will begin this week after the Senate completed approval of the bulk of the legislation and passed it to the lower house of Congress. The bill contains 7 blocks which, if approved, will radically change the energy sector opening the market to national and foreign private investment. Government will absorb labor liabilities in Pemex and CFE, and the collective agreement for employees will be modified. Both parties PAN and PRI believe the energy reform represents the greatest opportunity to transform the country. PRD argues that the energy reform enables the exploitation of the country’s resources and enrichment of transnational corporations.

Read more from El Universal…

  1. Economic growth and the reforms in Mexico. On one side, the Assistant Director in the Western Hemisphere Department of the International Monetary Fund, Robert Rennhack, assured that Mexico has achieved what very few countries have done by passing major reforms in various sectors through the will of political actors rather than through the pressure of economic or monetary crisis. At the same time, he forecasted that these reforms will have a positive impact  on the Mexican economy, especially investments derived from the energy reform. On the other side, the Center for Economic Studies of the Private Sector in Mexico, adjusted downwards its growth forecast for the Mexican economy in 2014 by placing it at 2.5 percent. Among the main reasons, they highlight weak domestic market and a loss of purchasing power.

Read more from El Universal and La Jornada…


Headlines from Mexico

July 21, 2014

07/21/14

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1. This weekend, the Senate approved changes to the regulatory framework of the Federal Commission of Electricity (CFE by its acronym in Spanish) and PEMEX as part of the new legislation of the Energy Reform. Among the main changes are the following: it provides technical, operational and managerial autonomy to both companies, thereby reducing the administrative burden to which they were subject. Furthermore, the labor rights of workers are protected and the unions are allowed to remain as key players in the decisions of both companies. Specifically for PEMEX, it facilitates the creation of various subsidiaries to operate a variety of hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation projects; meanwhile, authorizes the CFE to provide private firms access to the national transmission and distribution electric network.

This is the third set of changes approved by the Senate. The fourth and final set of legislative changes are expected to be discussed during this week. The changes are still pending discussion and approval in the lower house of the Mexican Congress.

Read more from Excelsior,Reforma,and La Jornada…

2. The Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS for its acronym in Spanish) and the Institute for Social Security and Services for State Workers (ISSSTE for its acronym in Spanish) are facing budgetary pressures due to large pension obligations. According to the Ministry of Finance, over 50% of their annual expenditure goes directly to pension payments, which could threaten their financial viability in the long term according to experts. Several voices from the academic and private sectors have called to take action to address the problem of the national pension system. Several state and municipal governments are facing similar challenges.

Read more from El Universal…

3. Following a confrontation between residents and police in Puebla, one child died. On July 9th, there was a clash between residents of San Bernardino Chalchihuapan and state police in Atlixco-Puebla highway. Protesters blocked both directions of the road and were asking for the return of the Civil Registry Office to the municipal council.  Members of the state police forced them to leave, which led to a confrontation that resulted in four people arrested, 18 injured policemen and a seriously injured child, who later died at the hospital. Controversy surrounds the case: the boy’s mother accused the state police of hurting her son with a rubber bullet, while the state government blamed the protesters. The Secretary of Public Safety rejected the notion that the state police used rubber bullets in the confrontation. Puebla’s State Government requested the Attorney General’s Office to deal with the matter in order to determine responsibility for injuries to the minor.

Read more from Reforma…

 


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