Safran Identity & Security to modernize Mexico’s multi-biometric identification system

12/21/2016 Nasdaq Global Newswire 

election's guide vote imageSafran Identity & Security has been awarded a five-year contract by the National Electoral Institute of Mexico (INE) for its multi-biometric identification system and related services. With this new contract, INE confirms its trust in Safran to conform and update the Mexican national voter registry that enables fair and efficient elections.

As one of the world’s largest systems of its kind, the multi-biometric identification system ensures each voter has a unique identity by detecting false or double-identity cases in real time. It uses both fingerprint and facial recognition to help ensure that each Mexican citizen is registered only once in the national voter rolls.

Read more…

With an unfriendly neighbour, Mexico needs to strengthen itself

The Economist 11/26/16 

us mex flagALMOST 25 years ago a Mexican president, Carlos Salinas, took a historic decision. He decreed that his country’s future lay in setting aside its fear and resentment of its mighty neighbour to the north and embracing economic integration with the United States through the North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The agreement underpinned the modernisation of part of Mexico’s economy. So the imminent arrival in the White House of Donald Trump, a critic of NAFTA who threatens to build a migrant-blocking wall between the two countries, looks like a disaster for Mexico.

Read more… 

How a One-Time Political Star in Mexico Ended Up Campaigning for Clinton

11/6/16 The New Yorker

marcelo_ebrard_casaubon
Marcelo Ebrard

Marcelo Ebrard was the mayor of Mexico City from 2006 to 2012, the time when that city gained a reputation as a dynamic, sophisticated world capital, even while the country’s image as a place of dark and ever deepening crisis, corruption, and violence steadily worsened. He implemented numerous urban quality-of-life initiatives—a wildly popular bike-sharing program, an expansion of the rights of sexual minorities, a reduction of crime, and an attack on the air-pollution problem (an initiative in which the Clinton Foundation was involved).
Read more…

Mexico town women vote locally for first time

09/22/16 BBC News

Elections.JPGWomen in a community in southern Mexico have voted in local elections for the first time, after winning a three-year battle for the right to choose a mayor and councillors alongside their male relatives.

Women have had the vote in Mexican presidential, general and regional elections since 1953, but the persistence of traditional law in parts of Oaxaca state means many towns have men-only voter lists for local polls, El Universal newspaper reports.

Read more…

Mexico cannot work with ‘crazy guy’ Trump, says former Mexican president Fox

08/19/16 Vice News

Vicente_Fox_2Former president Vicente Fox has urged the current Mexican government to make it clear that a Donald Trump presidency would be unacceptable to Mexico.

“You cannot work with a crazy guy,” Fox said of the Republican presidential nominee.

In an interview at his ranch-turned-presidential library in the central Mexican state of Guanajuato, Fox added that reasons of “political correctness” were not enough to persuade him of the need to “accept as my neighbor country’s president a crazy guy.”

The former leader’s comments directly challenged the recent softening of the current Mexican government’s tone on Trump.

Read more…

Short Sellers Pile Into Mexico as It Lands in U.S. Crossfire

08/01/16 Bloomberg

An exchange-traded fund focused on the Latin American nation’s shares has the most bearish bets of any country, while hedge funds including Finisterre Capital in London are pouring into credit-default insurance on Mexican bonds. Societe Generale SA projects the peso will keep underperforming emerging-market peers as the country comes under attack in one of the most rancorous U.S. election campaigns in memory.

Read more…

Both Parties Are Playing the Mexico Card

07/29/16 Truthout

us mex flagSurprisingly, Mexico has taken center stage in this year’s U.S. presidential elections.

While it has been cast mainly as the villain, the unexpected spotlight has sent politicians and activists on both sides of the border seeking to get their message out. If they’ve learned anything from the Trump playbook in the past months, it’s that negative attention is still free publicity.

Read more…