Mexico Falls Short of Backing Venezuela Against US Sanctions

April 7, 2015

TeleSUR English, 4/6/2015

413px-Felipe_Calderon_sin_fondo_iMexico fell short of backing Venezuela against the recent U.S. aggressions and sanctions toward its government, saying while it respects the sovereignty of every nation, there should be a dialogue between the parties involved.

“Mexico will continue to insist that the government of Venezuela and the different opposition groups in that country establish a dialogue,” the Mexican Foreign Ministry told La Jornada.

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In Mexico, Firing of Carmen Aristegui Highlights Rising Pressures on News Media

March 31, 2015

By Elisabeth Malkin, The New York Times, 3/27/2015

newspapers thumbnailMEXICO CITY — When Carmen Aristegui, Mexico’s most famous radio personality, was abruptly fired this month, nobody expected her to go quietly. But anger over her dismissal has been rising steadily, and it has turned up the heat in this country’s charged political atmosphere.

Conspiracy theories have abounded since a dispute between Ms. Aristegui and her employer, MVS Communications, ended in her departure. She has become an emblem of press freedom under siege, and social media has lighted up with demands for her return to the airwaves.

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Attacks on Press Rose Under Mexican President Peña Nieto: Report

March 25, 2015

Latin Dispatch, 3/25/2015

censorshipAttacks on Mexican journalists have risen since President Enrique Peña Nieto took office in late 2012, according to a report released Tuesday by the press freedom organization Article 19. In 2013 and 2014, an average of 328 so-called “aggressions” targeted journalists, up from an average of 182 a year under Peña Nieto’s predecessor Felipe Calderón. Six journalists were murdered in 2014.

Nearly half of those threats, according to the report, came from government officials.

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City in Mexico Bans Narco Songs

March 24, 2015

By Arron Daugherty, InSight Crime, 3/16/2015

musical noteA ban on music inspired by drug trafficking and organized crime bosses underscores the illicit trade’s impact on modern Mexican culture.

The city council in the capital of Mexico’s northern Chihuahua state has implemented a ban on performing and distributing a genre of music known as “narcocorridos” within city limits,reported Excelsior.

Violators are subject to fines of around $20,000 dollars and up to 36 hours in jail. Chihuahua state’s legislature approved a statewide ban on narcocorridos in 2011, but it was never implemented by municipalities. The capital’s city council has decided to put the ban into action and stiffen the penalties as they believe narcocorridos promote crime and violence while apologizing for and glorifying organized crime figures, according to Excelsior.

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MexicoLeaks Launches to Receive Information Leaks in Mexico

March 11, 2015

The New York Times 3/11/15

A group of Mexsecurity_lockican media outlets and civil society groups have launched MexicoLeaks, a digital platform to receive information leaks that could lead to corruption investigations.

Representatives of the effort said Tuesday that those wanting to leak information can do so anonymously. Information and tips will be investigated and confirmed before anything is published.

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The Fight for Mexico City’s Future

March 3, 2015

David Adler, 2/2/2015

Mexico City - nunavut (Flickr)MEXICO CITY — Around the corner from two taco stands and a small cantina, in an otherwise nondescript section of Mexico City’s Doctores neighborhood, there is an unmarked storefront known as the “Prepa Popular Tacuba.” On its outside, two large stencils frame the doorway. One depicts the Virgin of Guadalupe, melancholy, clinging to an AK-47. The other is of Emiliano Zapata, leader of Mexico’s biggest peasant revolution, scowling, looking outward. A poster below him carries the faces of Mexico’s missing 43 students.

Inside, in a large, dimly lit classroom, several leaders of Mexico City’s Urban Popular Movement convene for their weekly meeting. On the whiteboard, someone writes the details of an upcoming march in red marker. Others pass around copies of “Norma 26,” a law that regulates the construction of low-income housing in Mexico City. The rest of the members of the movement — a collection of local community organizations fighting for housing rights — sip instant coffee, eat biscuits and deliberate. “We must defend the city,” one leader said. “This is a matter of our right to the city, and we must defend it.”

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[VIDEO]:How an Undocumented Immigrant From Mexico Became a Star at Goldman Sachs

February 26, 2015

02/25/15 Bloomberg

Julissa Arce went from selling funnel cakes in Texas to derivatives at Wall Street’s most profitable securities firm

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