Mexican voices: 1 year into the López Obrador presidency

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12/01/19 – AP News

By Amy Guthrie

Andrés Manuel López Obrador has been president of Mexico for a year, after a landslide 2018 vote. He pledged a presidency close to the people, austere, with punishment for the corrupt and greater safety and economic well-being.

Not all has gone according to plan. The country’s murder rate continues to log record highs, while economic growth this year has been flat and borders on recession. Corruption and crime remain difficult plagues to eradicate, though the administration has taken on some high-profile targets.

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Mexican women protest violence via art, breastfeeding

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11/26/19 – AP News

By Amy Guthrie and Ginnette Riquelme

Women’s groups protested at cultural institutions in Mexico’s capital ahead of Monday’s International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, using painting, crocheting and breastfeeding to call attention to rampant violence and machismo in their country.

Dozens of women painted on a protective barricade around the Angel of Independence monument on the city’s main avenue Sunday while others crocheted purple and pink hearts to string up. The wall was erected after feminists used paint to deface the monument with graffiti in August to decry alleged rapes by police in the capital as well as high rates of murders of women throughout the country.

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Vogue cover spotlights Mexico’s transgender ‘muxe’ women

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11/20/19 – Reuters

By Jose de Jesus Cortes, David Alire Garcia

A culture of indigenous transgender women that has been part of southern Mexico’s heritage for centuries is primed for global fashion cachet thanks to one of the world’s top style magazines.

For the first time in Vogue magazine’s more than 120 years of publishing, an indigenous “muxe” will appear next month on the cover of the glossy’s Mexican and British editions.

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Mexico City debates allowing children legal gender change

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11/19/19 – AP News

A couple of hundred demonstrators have protested against a proposed Mexico City law that would allow children and adolescents to change the gender listed on their birth certificates.

They would have to be accompanied by at least one guardian to do so.

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Day of the Dead parade hits Mexico City as holiday expands

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10/29/19 – AP News

By Amy Guthrie

Thousands of Mexicans took to the streets of the capital to dance beside giant skulls and skeletons Sunday as Mexico City rolled out its fourth edition of a Day of the Dead parade inspired by Hollywood, part of an ever-expanding menu of festivities for the holiday.

The city once again borrowed props from the opening scene of the 2015 James Bond film, “Spectre,” in which Daniel Craig’s title character dons a skull mask as he makes his way through a crowd of revelers. Festivities in the capital have expanded in recent years to capitalize on growing interest in the holiday, with temporary art installations in public spaces and colorful weekend events. Yet another elaborate parade is scheduled to traverse the city’s iconic Reforma boulevard on Nov. 2, All Souls Day.

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AMLO, the World Series-watching president, wants to Make Mexican Baseball Great Again

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10/24/19 – The Washington Post

By Mary Beth Sheridan

It was another grim news conference for Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador. There was a narco crisis in Sinaloa. A clash with protesters in the capital. And now, a new threat from Washington.

 

His name was Juan Soto, and he was sticking it to the president’s team, the Astros.

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Mexico Fashion Week: Showcasing the work of contemporary designers and traditional artisans

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10/25/19 – CNN

By Kristen Bateman
It’s easy to see why contemporary designers seek to evoke traditional Mexican handcrafts and folk art through their collections.
Brightly-colored embroidery and intricate beading reflect skills passed down for generations, while the patterns themselves carry meaning far beyond modern print design.

Making do with less: Mexican media bruised by president’s austerity

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10/23/19 – Reuters

By Noe Torres

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador took office in December promising to reduce public spending to free up more resources for the poor. But his austerity drive has left media outlets reeling, and raised questions about whether Lopez Obrador is trying to influence coverage.

Between January and August, Lopez Obrador’s government spent 88 million pesos ($4.6 million) on advertising, just 3.6% of the sum spent in the same months of 2018 by his predecessor Enrique Pena Nieto, Public Administration Ministry (SFP) data show.

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The Dance Halls of Mexico City Show Off a Different Side of the City

 

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10/14/19 – Conde Nast Traveler

By Megan Spurrell

From the moment I stepped into Salon Los Angeles, a cavernous pink auditorium decked out in shimmering streamers and neon Art Deco signage, thrumming with a crowd that could really move, I knew I had come to the right place. The energy filled the out-of-the-way Guerrero dance hall like helium in a balloon, expanding with the buena onda of people spinning and smiling. I watched a middle-aged man in a bright red zoot suit step onto the floor, a long peasant feather stuck into his hat, wingtip shoes shuffling to the beat, and I knew this was more than a place to dance—this was a scene.

Salon Los Angeles opened its doors in 1937, and it’s been a mainstay dance hall for a tight-knit community since. In fact, it’s the oldest dance hall in all of Mexico City, and through the ebbs and flows of musical trends, it has remained a place to tap your hand-stitched oxford shoes to the clap of claves, catch world-famous bands, and mingle with others who love to dance. While the club has long catered to a steady set of regulars and serious dancers, a new wave of younger Mexicans—and travelers with an ear to the ground—are stepping onto the dance floor.

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12 Journalists Have Been Killed In Mexico This Year, The World’s Highest Toll

 

AMLO09/12/19 – NPR

By Carrie Khan

This year, Mexico surpassed Syria to become the deadliest country for journalists, according to the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists.

Many consider that overall levels of violence and impunity in Mexico are the biggest problems facing Mexican journalists. But press advocates say the president’s harsh rhetoric toward the media isn’t helping the situation.

So far this year, 12 journalists have been killed, according to Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission. Some press rights groups put the number even higher, according to their own reporting criteria.

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