Migration expert: Immigrants are fenced out of Mexico

8/13/15 El Daily Post

The Lago de las Monjas used to be a thriving lake but dried out a few decades ago. (Reason unclear.) will clarify
The Lago de las Monjas used to be a thriving lake but dried out a few decades ago. (Reason unclear.) will clarify

In the first Republican presidential debate, Donald Trump swore he’d build a wall to keep out Mexican migrants and his GOP rivals lined up to assure voters that they would “secure the border.” What these aspiring candidates neglected to mention is that the United States has already shoveled tens of billions of dollars into border security, to no avail. Billions more won’t magically turn a failed strategy, fraught with unintended consequences, into a successful one.

The United States is now 22 years into an unprecedented buildup of border enforcement resources: 21,000 Border Patrol agents, nearly 700 miles of various kinds of physical fences, a fleet of drones, high-tech electronic surveillance systems covering all major cities along the border, a gulag of immigration prisons to incarcerate apprehended migrants, and more.

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In bastion, Mexico kingpin seen as benevolent bandit

07/20/15 Business Insider

Mexican Flag XXLBadiraguato (Mexico) (AFP) – The lush Mexican mountain stronghold of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman is dotted with hamlets where poor farmers live in humble homes, scrape by on crops and lionize the fugitive drug kingpin.

One week after Guzman escaped prison again, his legend has grown in his home region in northwestern Sinaloa state, where he is revered as a benevolent bandit despite his drug cartel’s murderous record.

US authorities have intelligence suggesting Guzman is already in the region, the safest place for him because of the support he enjoys, an American security official told AFP.

Sites in Japan, Turkey, Mexico, Uruguay inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List, extension of Spanish site approved

07/06/15 UNESCO World Heritage Centre

youth holding globeThe World Heritage Committee this afternoon approved the inscription of four cultural sites on the World Heritage List: Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining in Japan, Ephesus in Turkey, Aqueduct of Padre Tembleque Hydraulic System in Mexico, and Fray Bentos Cultural-Industrial Landscape in Uruguay. The Committee also approved the extension of Spain’s Routes of Santiago de Compostela with the addition of the “Camino Francés and Routes of Northern Spain”.

To find out more about  the new sites read more…

US now has more Spanish speakers than Spain – only Mexico has more

06/30/15 The Guardian

dictionary_spanish_englishThe United States is now the world’s second largest Spanish-speaking country after Mexico, according to a new study published by the prestigious Instituto Cervantes.

The report says there are 41 million native Spanish speakers in the US plus a further 11.6 million who are bilingual, mainly the children of Spanish-speaking immigrants. This puts the US ahead of Colombia (48 million) and Spain (46 million) and second only to Mexico (121 million).

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Mexico Won’t Be Sending Anyone To Miss Universe Pageant After Donald Trump’s Comments

06/30/15 Huffington Post

beauty queen crownMEXICO CITY, June 29 (Reuters) – Mexico will not send a contestant to this year’s Miss Universe pageant after part owner and TV personality Donald Trump made comments insulting Mexicans, Mexican broadcaster Televisa said on Monday.
Televisa and former Miss Universe Lupita Jones organize a pageant to select a Mexican candidate for the contest.
U.S. broadcaster NBC has also said it would no longer air the pageant after Trump described migrants from Mexico as drug-runners and rapists. Trump made the comments when he announced earlier this month he was seeking the Republican nomination for the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

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Thousands of Mexican Teachers Protest Against Education Reform

6/24/15 teleSUR

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP - Getty Images
Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP – Getty Images

Thousands of dissident teachers took to the streets of Mexico City Wednesday, declaring a 24-hour strike to protest against the education reform promoted by President Enrique Peña Nieto. The protest follows a decision taken recently by the country’s Supreme Court which declared the reform and the controversial teacher evaluation tests to be constitutional. The evaluation is the main source of anger from the CNTE teachers’ union, which is an alternative to the mainstream national union SNTE. The teleSUR Correspondent in Mexico, Eduardo Matinez, reported that at least 10,000 teachers have joined the strike, adding that other sections of the country have taken part in the protest for the first time. Today’s march started in the capital’s Revolution Monument, before going to the Senate and concluding at a rally in the Secretariat for Public Education (SEP) headquarters.

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A false war fades: the end of Brazil-Mexico rivalry?

6/10/15 Financial Times – beyondbrics

Flag-Pins-Mexico-BrazilFor much of the past two decades, Brazil and Mexico seemed at times to be on a collision course. Diplomats from Latin America’s two largest nations were often preoccupied, if not obsessed, with a competition for an elusive role as regional leaders and players in the post-Cold War shifting global scene. The 2013 battle for the post of director general at the World Trade Organization, won by Brazilian diplomat Roberto Azevêdo over Mexican Herminio Blanco, a former trade minister, left plenty of hurt feelings. Ironically, the dispute for influence also led to convergence. The 2011 creation of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean Nations (CELAC), proposed by Mexico to affirm its Latin American identity and counter a perceived Brazilian effort to separate it from the region, was warmly embraced in Brasília as a way project leadership by promoting formats that excluded the US.

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