Former Mexican President: We’re Not Paying for a ‘Stupid’ Wall

2/09/16 NBC News

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Felipe Calderón

 

A former Mexican president had some tough words when asked about GOP candidate Donald Trump’s much-touted plan to build a border wall that he says will be paid for by Mexico.”We are not going to pay any single cent for such a stupid wall! And it’s going to be completely useless,” said former Mexican president Felipe Calderón when asked about this at the AmCham Egypt for Business Conference on Sunday.

“We are not going to pay any single cent for such a stupid wall! And it’s going to be completely useless,” said former Mexican president Felipe Calderón when asked about this at the AmCham Egypt for Business Conference on Sunday.

Calderón had harsh words about the Republican presidential race during his conversation with CNBC’s Hadley Gamble, saying it was “incredible” that quite an “admirable society” like the U.S. had candidates like Trump.

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The “bridge to nowhere” now connects the United States and Mexico

2/4/2016 Mexico Institute via Forbes.com

By Christopher Wilson and E. Anthony Wayne

On February 4, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and U.S. Secretaries of Homeland Security and Commerce are scheduled to inaugurate the new border crossing just south of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua. Once called the “bridge to nowhere” because the U.S. half was completed before the Mexican portion was built, the international bridge and port of entry facilities at Tornillo-Guadalupe will now help manage the massive legal flows of goods and people across our border.  Over $1 million dollars of trade per minute crosses our common border and an estimated 950,000 people legally cross the border each day to study, visit family members, do business and go shopping.

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[Video] U.S.-Mexico Cooperation in Drug War

1/17/2016 Washington Journal, C-SPAN

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Duncan Wood talked to C-SPAN’s Washington Journal about the recapture of Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman and its implications for U.S.-Mexican cooperation in future anti-drug trafficking efforts.

Watch the Video.

EVENT | Mexico Security Review 2016: Assessing the Outlook for the Rule of Law

security_lockWHEN: Thursday, January 21, 9:00am-1:00pm

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor

Click to RSVP

Mexico faced major security challenges in 2015. Homicides ticked upward for the first time since 2011, and Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán’s escape from a maximum-security prison was a major embarrassment. An OAS-linked group of independent experts examined the disappearance of 43 students in Guerrero and found major discrepancies with the official version. 2016 has started off with good news for the government with the recapture of “El Chapo,”  and this year is also the deadline for Mexico to complete the transition to an adversarial justice system.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to its third annual Mexican security review. The forum will provide a careful examination of Mexico’s security landscape in 2015 and 2016. What does the recapture of El Chapo mean for Mexico’s security in 2016? How will the Peña Nieto administration continue to build on his recapture, and what will the new justice system mean for fighting crime and criminal networks?

Please join us for presentations featuring leading Mexican and U.S. security analysts and researchers, and representatives from the Mexican government.

Welcome

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Panel I: Overview of 2015 and Trends in 2016

David Shirk
Professor, University of San Diego
Director, Justice in Mexico Project
Global Fellow, Wilson Center

Alejandro Hope
Editor, Security and Justice, El Daily Post

Viridiana Rios
Fellow, Wilson Center

Eric L. Olson
Associate Director, Latin American Program &
Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Moderator:
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Panel II: Reforming the Criminal Justice System

Keynote: Mtro. Rommel Moreno Manjarrez
Head of the Special Department for the Implementation of the Adversarial Criminal Justice System,
Office of the Attorney General (PGR)

Layda Negrete
Coordinator, Quality of Justice Project, México Evalúa

Octavio Rodriguez
Program Coordinator, Justice in Mexico Project, University of San Diego

Matthew Ingram
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University at Albany, SUNY

Moderator:
Eric L. Olson
Associate Director, Latin American Program &
Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

There will be a live webcast available. 

Click to RSVP

El Chapo Case Draws Mexico Closer to U.S.

1/11/2016 The New York Times

Mexico has started letting American agents carry guns on its soil. A special Mexican unit trained by Americans has been revived after stalling because of mistrust and a sense of national pride. American agents are working with Mexican soldiers to seize guns, and the two nations just agreed on a plan to tackle the heroin epidemic.

Even before Joaquín Guzmán Loera, the infamous drug trafficker known as El Chapo, tunneled out of Mexico’s most secure prison over the summer, the Mexican government had begun rebuilding its strained relationship with the United States. But the drug lord’s stunning escape shrank that distance even more, creating a sense of shared urgency that had not existed in years.

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‘El Chapo’: Mexico’s Extradition Process Briefly Explained

1/11/2016 InSight Crime

InSightLogo_main_24bitMexico confirmed that it has begun the process to extradite Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán to the United States, but it could be a year or more before the recaptured drug kingpin is handed to the US justice system.

Mexico’s Attorney General’s Office (Procuraduría General de la República – PGR) announced on January 10 that it had launched formal extradition proceedings.In a statement on its website, the PGR said that two Interpol agents had served Guzmán with two warrants in prison. But Mexican officials said Guzmán’s ability to challenge his extradition could mean the entire process could take at least a year, the BBC reported.

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Marco Rubio’s Mexico misstep

Roberta_S_Jacobson1/4/2016 Chicago Tribune

It’s fine for Sen. Marco Rubio to oppose the Obama administration’s diplomatic detente with Cuba. But Rubio’s doing so in odd fashion, particularly for someone who wants to be president.

Rubio is holding a hostage: President Barack Obama’s nominee for ambassador to Mexico.

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