Haitian immigrants cross border through Mexico, claim asylum for quick processing and entry

08/22/16 The Washington Times

immigrationHaitian immigrants are surging across America’s southwest border, blazing a path through Mexico to the U.S., where they have been coached to claim asylum, earning them quick processing and almost immediate entry into the country.

Analysts called it a backdoor amnesty that’s increasingly being abused by illegal immigrants who normally would have no shot of staying in the U.S., but who, by claiming asylum, can gain a foothold here.

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Overall Number of U.S. Unauthorized Immigrants Holds Steady Since 2009

09/20/16 Pew Research Center

immigrationThe U.S. unauthorized immigrant population – 11.1 million in 2014 – has stabilized since the end of the Great Recession, as the number from Mexico declined but the total from other regions of the world increased, according to new Pew Research Center estimates based on government data.

Among world regions, the number of unauthorized immigrants from Asia, Central America and sub-Saharan Africa rose between 2009 and 2014. The number from Mexico has steadily declined since 2007, the first year of the Great Recession, but Mexicans remain more than half (52%) of U.S. unauthorized immigrants.

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No barriers can stop immigration: Mexican president at U.N.

09/19/16 Reuters

A US cable claimed Televisa gave the Mexico State governor Enrique Peña Nieto wide coverageEfforts to stop immigration and the mix of cultures are bound to fail, Mexico’s President Enrique Pena Nieto told a United Nations summit on migrants and refugees on Monday, as his country’s northern border has become an issue in the U.S. presidential election campaign.

Pena Nieto took a public opinion shellacking for hosting Republican Party candidate Donald Trump on Aug. 31 because Trump has repeatedly vowed to build a border wall to keep out illegal immigrants and said Mexico would pay for it.

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How Mexico and the U.S. Can Fix Migration

09/12/16 The New York Times 

7965358232_f6f2b6f792_o.jpgWASHINGTON — The United States and Mexico have a rich, shared history. For more than a century, people have moved back and forth at the border to work. Their toil and industry could have taken place within a well-regulated and mutually beneficial labor market. But in recent years much of their labor has occurred in a vast black market — harming workers, families, security and public finances in both countries.

There is justifiable disappointment at this outcome. We have watched with frustration, from the highest levels of government on each side of the border, as two neighbors have wasted opportunities to help each other.

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Immigration Source Shifts to Asia From Mexico

09/07/16 The Wall Street Journal

immigrationChinese and Indian newcomers to the U.S. are now outpacing Mexican arrivals in most regions of the country, a marked reversal from a decade ago, when immigrants from America’s southern neighbor dwarfed arrivals from the large Asian countries.

A Wall Street Journal analysis of census figures shows that in Illinois, New York, Ohio, Virginia, Florida, Georgia and other states, more immigrants from China and India arrived than from Mexico in 2014, the most recent year for which data are available.

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Passage through Mexico: the global migration to the US

09/06/16 The Guardian

shutterstock_10213060The sun has barely risen and already hundreds of migrants are gathered outside the vast white and green immigration detention centre, hoping to get through its gates.

Most have travelled thousands of miles on foot, by boat and bus from South America, but few here speak Spanish. In front of the locked gates near Mexico’s southern border, it’s an eclectic mix of French, English, Creole, Urdu, Lingala and Somali.

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Global Migration Flows

08/10/2016 International Organization for Migration (IOM)

world map.pngThe GLOBAL MIGRATION FLOWS interactive app tracks migrants around the world. This application is now being hosted by IOM.int. It is endlessly fascinating to explore where we’re from. The underlying data for the map was published by the UN DESA in 2015.

Using the app:
Choose whether you want to access information about migrants leaving a country (Outward) or migrants entering a country (Inward). Then click on a country and watch the pattern of migration to or from the chosen country. Countries that neither send nor receive migrants will fade out. Hover over a country or over a migrant cluster to access the data. Each circle represents up to 20,000 migrants.

This migration visualization tool is being developed by Locus Insight in collaboration with IOM. Locus Insight is a data visualization studio dedicated to clarifying complex data through engaging interactive charts. Our work is informed by an intelligent understanding of current world topics and animated by the latest interactive data technology.

Read more and use the app…