Mexico finds dehydrated migrants in US-bound lorry

10/21/16 BBC News

immigrationThe Mexican authorities say they have stopped a lorry carrying 121 Central American migrants, who were trying to reach the US illegally.

They were found after police at a checkpoint in the southern state of Tabasco heard calls for help coming from the vehicle and the sound of crying children.

Many of the migrants, who included 55 minors, were badly dehydrated.

Most had come from Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador or Ecuador.

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Why Haitians are stranded in Mexico

20/10/16 PRI

In a quiet Tijuana neighborhood, Haitian migrants mill about in the morning light. Some rest on blankets under trees, others play dominoes. Babo Pierrot, 44, wearing a tattered sweatshirt, talks to his wife in Haitian Creole. The couple and their baby boy arrived here about two weeks ago, migrating from Brazil. They had lived there since the massive 2010 earthquake in Haiti forced them to leave.

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Haitians vulnerable on Mexico-U.S. border as migrant crisis escalates

10/19/16 Reuters

bicultural1Camped in migrant centers, broken-down rooms of a dingy, semi-derelict hotel and on church floors, thousands of Haitians desperate to enter the United States are in limbo and exposed to crime in dangerous border neighborhoods of Mexico.

The hard-bitten fringes of Tijuana and Mexicali are currently believed to house some 5,000 Haitians, and about 300 more are arriving daily after an arduous journey from Brazil, Mexican official numbers show.

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Migration at US-Mexico Border Is Shifting in Big Way

10/17/16 NBC New York

Border - MexicoThe people arriving at the United States’ southern border are no longer Mexican migrants, mostly men, in search of jobs, but a steady stream of asylum-seekers, NBC News reports.

The Obama administration said Monday that the prevailing view of the border is outdated, and that more Central Americans were seized along the border than Mexicans in fiscal year 2016, only the second year that’s happened.

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Border fence

The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration

“Although this report focuses on the United States, the rise in the share of foreign-born populations is an international phenomenon among developed countries. And, given disparities in economic opportunities and labor force demographics that persist across regions of the world, immigration is an issue that will likely endure. Recent refugee crises further highlight the complexity of immigration and add to the urgency of understanding the resultant economic and societal impacts (…)

(…) To what extent do the skills brought to market by immigrants complement those of native-born workers, thereby improving their prospects; and to what extent do immigrants displace native workers in the labor market or lower their wages? How does immigration contribute to vibrancy in construction, agriculture, high tech, and other sectors? What is the role of immigration in driving productivity gains and long-term economic growth? “

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4 migrants die of apparent suffocation in eastern Mexico

10/5/16 The Washington Post 

migrantesMEXICO CITY — Four migrants died in Mexico’s eastern state of Veracruz, apparently suffocating in a truck that was carrying them and dozens of others to the border with the United States, Mexican officials said Wednesday.

The National Immigration Institute said in a statement that the four were among 55 migrants abandoned by their smugglers near the town of Tres Valles. Many of those who survived were severely dehydrated and had not had food or water for two days when they were found Tuesday evening.

Ten migrants remained hospitalized, including three still unidentified because of their delicate condition.

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Death in the sands: the horror of the US-Mexico border

4/10/16 The Guardian

untitledFifteen-year old Sergio Hernandez Guereca and three teenage friends ran across the trickle of water in the concrete riverbed that is the Rio Grande, which marks the US-Mexico boarder, on a cloudy, hot June day in 2010. The river, which runs between El Paso and Juarez, is only centimeters deep and 15 metres wide at the border, because the US diverts most of the water into a canal before it reaches Mexico. The audacity of the boys’ run, in broad daylight in one of the most heavily patrolled spots along the border, roused bored pedestrians inching along the Paso del Norte Bridge towards the checkpoint.

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