Latest Border Stats Point to Heavy Child, Family Migration in 2015

February 12, 2015

2/11/2015 Washington Office on Latin America

Border - MexicoA wave of Central American children and families, many fleeing violence in their home countries, received heavy media attention in the summer of 2014. Then, the wave receded quickly: by August 2014, the U.S. Border Patrol was apprehending fewer unaccompanied Central American children than it was in August 2013. The humanitarian crisis disappeared from the headlines.

The crisis is not over. If current trends continue, child and family apprehensions in 2015 will fall behind 2014, but still exceed 2013 and every other year on record.

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Mexico Deports Record Numbers of Women and Children in US-Driven Effort

February 4, 2015

2/4/2015 The Guardian

Border fenceRecord numbers of women and children fleeing violence and poverty in Central America were deported by Mexican authorities last year, as part of US-driven operations to stem the flow of migrants reaching the American border.

More than 24,000 women were deported from Mexico in 2014 – double the number sent home in 2013. The upsurge in child detentions was even sharper – climbing 230% to just over 23,000, Mexican interior ministry figures reveal…

Duncan Wood, director of the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Centre, said: “Mexico knows the southern border is the biggest weakest spot of the country where it is most vulnerable to organised crime, undocumented migration and non-traditional threats like infectious diseases. The Peña Nieto government is trying to get a handle on it and reassert sovereignty. The US has offered help with great gusto.”

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Arrests of Undocumented Migrants Along U.S.-Mexico Border at Lowest Level Since 1970s

January 30, 2015

By Fox News Latino, 1/30/2015

Immigration_and_Customs_Enforcement_arrestHomeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said Thursday that detentions of undocumented migrants trying to cross the southern U.S. border in 2014 fell to the lowest level since the 1970s.

“These numbers are no doubt partially due to economic conditions and trends in the U.S., Mexico and Central America, but also due to the very large investment this nation has made in border security over the last 15 years,” Johnson said at the Woodrow Wilson Center, a Washington think-tank, where he gave his evaluation of his department’s activities in 2014 and elucidated its goals for 2015.

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How Mexicans Became Americans

January 21, 2015

1/17/2015 The New York Times

shutterstock_102739391A few weeks ago, the City Council in this suburb southeast of Los Angeles appointed a Mexican immigrant to its advisory council. Jesus Miranda is from Michoacán and owns a taco restaurant here. He’ll advise the council on housing development and other issues.

Mr. Miranda’s appointment is hardly national news. But small moments like these are signs of a historic change of heart toward America and civic engagement among Mexican immigrants, many of whom, like Mr. Miranda, have been here for decades. No place offers a clearer view of this change than the suburbs southeast of Los Angeles.

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Immigrants Can Get Mexican Birth Certificates in U.S.

January 16, 2015

1/15/2015 NBC News

mexican-flag1Starting Thursday, Mexico’s 50 consulates in the U.S. will be able to issue birth certificates to Mexican citizens. The move will make it easier for Mexican immigrants to obtain driver’s licenses, passports, work permits and protection from deportation under President Obama’s upcoming executive action.

“It helps individuals really begin to formulate their formal identity in this country,” said Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles. Prior to this change some immigrants in the U.S. relied on relatives in Mexico to get their birth certificates, which was a longer and more difficult process.

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Mexico-United States Relations: Howdy, Pardner

January 8, 2015

1/7/2015 The Economist

President Obama visits Mexico President Enrique Pena NietoThe leaders of the United States and Mexico, who met in Washington on January 6th, have both experienced dramatic changes of fortune in recent months. Barack Obama, who looked feeble in the face of a divided Congress, has taken bold actions on immigration and Cuba that have endeared him to Latin Americans. Enrique Peña Nieto, whom Mr. Obama must have envied for his ability to persuade Mexico’s Congress to launch historic reforms, has instead been clobbered by crime and scandal.

But this reversal of fortune did not upset the mutual esteem that has improved a cross-border relationship once fraught with insecurity and friction. More than their predecessors, Mr. Obama and Mr. Peña recognize “the need to focus on the good news”, even if that means downplaying such issues as corruption and the arms and drugs money that flow into Mexico from the United States, says Duncan Wood, head of the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington.

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New Era in Immigration Enforcement at the U.S. Southwest Border

December 17, 2014

12/16/2014 Migration Policy Institute

fence at borderThis year marked a transition to a new chapter in the United States’ three decade-long effort to limit illegal immigration across the Southwest border. Previously, border crossers were primarily Mexican men pursuing employment, with most attempting entry in Arizona and California. The flow has increasingly shifted to Southeast Texas and from predominantly Mexican to majority Central American since 2012, with a rising share of children and families included in the stream. That trend was sharply underscored in the late spring and summer of 2014, with the surge in arrivals of unaccompanied children and parents with young children from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.

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