Trump reignites call for border wall

02/23/2018 The Economist

border_at_Tijuana Tomas CastelazoPresident Trump on Friday reignited his calls for a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border with a tweet attacking the governments of El Salvador and Mexico.

In an early-morning tweet, the president alleged that MS-13 gang members originating from El Salvador are traveling through Mexico and re-entering the U.S. after being deported. The two countries’ governments, Trump said, are not doing enough to stop them.

“MS-13 gang members are being removed by our Great ICE and Border Patrol Agents by the thousands, but these killers come back in from El Salvador, and through Mexico, like water. El Salvador just takes our money, and Mexico must help MORE with this problem. We need The Wall!” the president wrote.

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UPCOMING EVENT | The Impact of Immigration Enforcement Policies on Teaching and Learning in America’s Public Schools

education2WHEN: Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 11:30am-1:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

 

There has been considerable discussion in news outlets about the impact of immigration enforcement policies on children and families. Recent incidents across the country and reported in the press have raised alarm throughout immigrant communities. Clearly there is great fear in this hyper-sensitized environment. To what extent is this ramped up immigration enforcement impacting our nation’s public schools? How does it vary by region and what is the “collateral” fallout for non-immigrant students? How are educators reacting and to what extent is this affecting them? What rights do students have and what happens to U.S.-citizen children when they are sent to a country and school system they do not know? To address these questions, four new research papers will be presented with brief highlights. There will be ample time for Q&A and discussion. The studies include:

•         A new national survey of the impact of immigration enforcement on teaching and learning in the nation’s schools
•         The impact of immigration enforcement on educators
•         Federal and state policy affecting the children of immigrants and their schooling
•         What happens to U.S. citizen students caught up in deportation of family members

 

A light lunch will be served at 11:30am. The program will begin at 12:00pm.

Co-sponsored by:

     

Introduction
Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Presenters
Patricia Gándara, Co-Director, Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles, UCLA

Bryant Jensen, Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University

Shena Sanchez, Research Associate, University of California, Los Angeles

Julie Sugarman, Senior Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Institute

Commentator
Lily Eskelsen Garcia, President, National Education Association

Moderator
Claudio Sanchez, Education Correspondent, National Public Radio

Click to RSVP

Trump faces legal challenge on border wall with Mexico

02/09/2018 The Washington Post

Border fenceAn Indiana-born federal judge, whose Mexican heritage Donald Trump used to paint him as biased against him in a 2016 court case because of his immigration stance, will hear arguments in a lawsuit that could block construction of a border wall with Mexico.

Judge Gonzalo Curiel will hear arguments Friday on a lawsuit from the state of California and advocacy groups that a border wall with Mexico must go through normal environmental reviews, which could cause major delays.

The Trump administration wants Curiel to dismiss the challenges, and wall opponents want him to immediately rule in their favor.

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The US can build as many walls as it wants but they don’t work, says former Mexico president

01/25/2018 CNBC
mexican-american_border_at_nogales

The United States has the right to build as many walls as it wants, but that’s not the right way to approach border security, former Mexican President Vicente Fox told CNBC on Wednesday.

“Walls historically have never worked — the Chinese wall, the Berlin wall,” he said in an interview with “Closing Bell.”

“There are many more intelligent ways of bringing order to the border, of bringing security to the border,” added Fox, who has been one of President Donald Trump’s frequent critics.

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New Publication | A New Migration Agenda Between the United States and Mexico

By Andrew Selee

migration-policy-coverToday, the number of Mexicans crossing the border illegally has dropped to a 40-year low, and there are almost certainly more Mexican immigrants leaving the United States than arriving. A majority of the immigrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally are now Central Americans, and the U.S. and Mexican governments have been working closely to find ways to limit this flow and keep people from making the dangerous journey north. Perhaps most surprisingly, the number of Americans in Mexico has been growing rapidly, reaching somewhere around a million people, almost as large a group of U.S. citizens as live in all of the countries of the European Union combined.

The United States and Mexico each have interests in protecting their sovereignty and enforcing their immigration laws, but they will also need to work together to address Central American immigration, ensure robust growth in Mexico that keeps migration from starting up again, and protecting their own citizens living in the other country.

A New Migration Agenda Between the United States and Mexico,” was written by Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President of the Wilson Center and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute. In this policy brief, Selee reviews existing cooperation between the United States and Mexico on migration and provides policy recommendations for a more nuanced and balanced migration agenda.

This policy brief is the third of our series “Charting a New Course: Policy Options for the Next Stage in U.S.-Mexico Relations.” The policy briefs will be released individually and published as a volume in the spring of 2017.

Read the policy brief…

Can Trump fulfill his campaign promises on immigration and trade? Mexico hopes not

11/9/16 Los Angeles Times

Border fenceAfter months of apprehension, denial and behind-the-scenes crisis planning, Mexican officials on Wednesday had to face reality: the long-dreaded “Trump Effect.”

Even before Donald Trump was declared winner of the U.S. presidential election, the Mexican currency skidded in international trading, nearing a record of 20 pesos to the dollar. Discussions among many citizens took on a fatalistic, even funereal tone.

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NEW PUBLICATION | Bilingual, Bicultural, Not Yet Binational: Undocumented Immigrant Youth in Mexico & the United States

jill-anderson-coverBy Jill Anderson

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An entire generation of children, adolescents and young adults has been caught in the crucible of increasing criminalization of immigrants coupled with neoliberal globalization policies in Mexico and the United States. These are first- and second-generation immigrant youth who are bicultural, often bilingual, but rarely recognized as binational citizens in either of their countries. Since 2005, an estimated two million Mexicans have returned to Mexico after having lived in the United States, including over 500,000 U.S.-born children. As of 2005, the population of Mexican-origin immigrant youth in the United States (first- and second-generation) reached an estimated 6.9 million. They have come of age in conditions of extreme vulnerability due to their undocumented status or the undocumented status of their parents.

The challenges that immigrant youth face in the aftermath of deportation and return are varied. Emotional distress, post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression and alienation are commonly described as key factors during the first months to years of return. These young people have experienced family separation, a sense of alienation, and human rights violations during detention and deportation. Systemic and inter-personal discrimination against deportees and migrants among the non-migrant population in Mexico can make an already challenging situation more difficult. For some, an accent, a lack of language proficiency in Spanish, and/or tattoos make it difficult to “blend in,” find jobs, or continue their studies. In addition to emotional and socio-cultural stress, there are also facing systemic educational, employment and political barriers to local integration and stability.

This paper examines the phenomenon of binational immigrant youth and, in the interest of constructing a binational agenda that privileges the human security and socio-economic integration of immigrant youth in the United States and Mexico in the short- and long-term, proposes a list of binational public policy recommendations.

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