EVENT MONDAY | Latinos in America: From Immigrants to Citizens

jklWHEN: Monday, October 26, 3:00-4:00pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Latinos are one of the fastest growing minorities in American society. But who or what is a Latino? Many are recent arrivals and they are making the transition from immigrants to citizens. But how fast are they integrating, what are their political views, and how will they affect American politics in coming decades? The Latino Center for Leadership Development in Dallas, the Tower Center at SMU, and the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute are seeking to answer these and other questions, looking at the socio-demographic profile of Latinos, the dilemmas of civic and political integration, and the hurdles that Latinos face in their quest to become full citizens.


Michael Jones-Correa
Former Wilson Center Fellow

Miryam Hazan
Consultant, Inter-American Development Bank

Andrew Selee
Executive Vice President and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Miguel Esteban Solis
President, Latino Center for Leadership Development

Tom K. Wong
Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego

Click to RSVP.

Immigrant Employment and Earnings Growth in Canada and the U.S.: Evidence from Longitudinal Data

New Report from The National Bureau of Economic Research

By Neeraj Kaushal, Yao Lu, Nicole Denier, Julia Shu-Huah Wang, Stephen J. Trejo
September 2015

In this new report, the authors study the short-term trajectories of employment, hours worked, and real wages of immigrants in Canada and the U.S. using nationally representative longitudinal data sets covering 1996-2008. Models with person fixed effects show that on average immigrant men in Canada do not experience any relative growth in these three outcomes compared to men born in Canada. Immigrant men in the U.S., on the other hand, experience positive annual growth in all three domains relative to U.S. born men. This difference is largely on account of low-educated immigrant men, who experience faster or longer periods of relative growth in employment and wages in the U.S. than in Canada. The authors further compare longitudinal and cross-sectional trajectories and find that the latter over-estimate wage growth of earlier arrivals, presumably reflecting selective return migration.

Click here to access the study. 

244 Immigrants With Criminal Records Face Deportation in California

8/31/15 The New York Times

More than 240 immigrants with criminal records who are living in the United States illegally were taken into custody last week during a four-day sweep across Southern California, immigration authorities said Monday.

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants participate in march for Immigrants and Mexicans protesting against Illegal Immigration reform by U.S. Congress, Los Angeles, CA, May 1, 200All 244 people taken into custody had been convicted of a crime and more than half of them had at least one felony conviction, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials, who called it the most successful sweep of its kind in the region. The majority of those arrested had been convicted of violent felonies, weapons or sex abuse charges. The rest had been convicted of “significant or multiple misdemeanors,” immigration officials said.

Roughly two-thirds of the immigrants taken in the sweep were from Mexico, and the remainder came from 21 other countries, including France, Ghana and Thailand.

Read more…

Immigration Shift Shows India, China Outpacing Mexico

8/29/15 ABC News

mexico-chinaSiddharth Jaganath wanted to return to India after earning his master’s degree at Texas’ Southern Methodist University. Instead, he built a new life in the U.S. over a decade, becoming a manager at a communications technology company and starting a family in the Dallas suburb of Plano. “You start growing your roots and eventually end up staying here,” the 37-year-old said.

His path is an increasingly common one: Immigrants from China and India, many with student or work visas, have overtaken Mexicans as the largest groups coming into the U.S., according to U.S. Census Bureau research released in May. The shift has been building for more than a decade and experts say it’s bringing more highly skilled immigrants here. And some Republican presidential candidates have proposed a heavier focus on employment-based migration, which could accelerate traditionally slow changes to the country’s ever-evolving face of immigration.

Read more…

What Americans want to do about illegal immigration

8/25/15 Pew Research Center

Passport -CitizenshipThe debate over the future of the nation’s estimated 11.3 million unauthorized immigrants is on the political front burner once more.

President Barack Obama set the stage in November when he announced new executive actions (now tied up in court) to prevent the deportation of millions of unauthorized immigrants, expanding 2012’s original program aimed mostly at providing relief to those brought to the United States as children. Illegal immigration has dominated the Republican presidential campaign, particularly after Donald Trump’s call for deporting all undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Others have called for a changing the constitutional amendment that guarantees birthright citizenship.

Among the public overall, there is little support for an effort to deport all those in the U.S. illegally, but surveys in past years have found greater support for building a barrier along the Mexican border and for changing the Constitution to ban birthright citizenship.

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Experts: Trump’s Border Wall Could Be Costly, Ineffective

8/19/2015 News Channel 9

Via Flickr user "Gage Skidmore"
Via Flickr user “Gage Skidmore”

Donald Trump, the current frontrunner for the Republican 2016 presidential nomination, released his first policy paper over the weekend, proposing ‘immigration reform that will make America great again.’

Trump has faced criticism for negative comments about illegal immigrants, but he has remained at the top of the Republican field in the polls and some of his opponents vying for the party’s nomination have adopted hardline positions on the issue similar to his.

One of the central tenets of Trump’s immigration policy is a wall across the U.S/Mexico border—’A nation without borders is not a nation,’ he states in his policy paper—but immigration experts question the effectiveness and cost of such a venture.

Analysts See U.S. Border With Mexico As More Secure Than It’s Been In 40 Years

8/20/15 NPR

Via Flikr user 'OccupyReno'
Via Flikr user ‘OccupyReno’

While Donald Trump’s recent position paper on immigration dominates headlines, a new study of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. digs into the latest numbers.

The Washington, D.C.-based Migration Policy Institute released “An Analysis of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States by Country and Region of Birth.” It’s based on U.S. Census Bureau data.

Some of the findings may not surprise you. Mexicans represent 6 million of the estimated 11 million unauthorized immigrants in this country, making up 56 percent of the total. An additional 1.6 million, or 15 percent, come from Central America. Asia (China, India, Philippines, South Korea, Vietnam and Pakistan) accounts for 1.5 million, or 14 percent, of the unauthorized population.

Read more…