What Americans want to do about illegal immigration

8/25/15 Pew Research Center

Passport -CitizenshipThe debate over the future of the nation’s estimated 11.3 million unauthorized immigrants is on the political front burner once more.

President Barack Obama set the stage in November when he announced new executive actions (now tied up in court) to prevent the deportation of millions of unauthorized immigrants, expanding 2012’s original program aimed mostly at providing relief to those brought to the United States as children. Illegal immigration has dominated the Republican presidential campaign, particularly after Donald Trump’s call for deporting all undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Others have called for a changing the constitutional amendment that guarantees birthright citizenship.

Among the public overall, there is little support for an effort to deport all those in the U.S. illegally, but surveys in past years have found greater support for building a barrier along the Mexican border and for changing the Constitution to ban birthright citizenship.

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Experts: Trump’s Border Wall Could Be Costly, Ineffective

8/19/2015 News Channel 9

Via Flickr user "Gage Skidmore"
Via Flickr user “Gage Skidmore”

Donald Trump, the current frontrunner for the Republican 2016 presidential nomination, released his first policy paper over the weekend, proposing ‘immigration reform that will make America great again.’

Trump has faced criticism for negative comments about illegal immigrants, but he has remained at the top of the Republican field in the polls and some of his opponents vying for the party’s nomination have adopted hardline positions on the issue similar to his.

One of the central tenets of Trump’s immigration policy is a wall across the U.S/Mexico border—’A nation without borders is not a nation,’ he states in his policy paper—but immigration experts question the effectiveness and cost of such a venture.

Analysts See U.S. Border With Mexico As More Secure Than It’s Been In 40 Years

8/20/15 NPR

Via Flikr user 'OccupyReno'
Via Flikr user ‘OccupyReno’

While Donald Trump’s recent position paper on immigration dominates headlines, a new study of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. digs into the latest numbers.

The Washington, D.C.-based Migration Policy Institute released “An Analysis of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States by Country and Region of Birth.” It’s based on U.S. Census Bureau data.

Some of the findings may not surprise you. Mexicans represent 6 million of the estimated 11 million unauthorized immigrants in this country, making up 56 percent of the total. An additional 1.6 million, or 15 percent, come from Central America. Asia (China, India, Philippines, South Korea, Vietnam and Pakistan) accounts for 1.5 million, or 14 percent, of the unauthorized population.

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Immigration Reform 2015: Path To Citizenship Favored By 65 Percent Of Americans

8/13/15 International Business Times

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants participate in march for Immigrants and Mexicans protesting against Illegal Immigration reform by U.S. Congress, Los Angeles, CA, May 1, 200An overwhelming majority of Americans favor a plan that would allow undocumented immigrants to remain in the United States and ultimately become citizens, according to a Gallup poll released Wednesday. The poll comes out as national debate swirls around the more than 10 million immigrants estimated to be living in the United States illegally.

According to the poll, 65 percent of American adults favor allowing undocumented immigrants to stay and become citizens if they meet certain requirements over time; 19 percent would favor a plan that allows them to stay in the country temporarily, and 14 percent would like to see them all deported to their home countries. Of the groups identified in the poll, Hispanic Americans are the most likely to support pathways to citizenship (77 percent), followed by black Americans (70 percent) and then white Americans (62 percent).

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Migration expert: Immigrants are fenced out of Mexico

8/13/15 El Daily Post

The Lago de las Monjas used to be a thriving lake but dried out a few decades ago. (Reason unclear.) will clarify
The Lago de las Monjas used to be a thriving lake but dried out a few decades ago. (Reason unclear.) will clarify

In the first Republican presidential debate, Donald Trump swore he’d build a wall to keep out Mexican migrants and his GOP rivals lined up to assure voters that they would “secure the border.” What these aspiring candidates neglected to mention is that the United States has already shoveled tens of billions of dollars into border security, to no avail. Billions more won’t magically turn a failed strategy, fraught with unintended consequences, into a successful one.

The United States is now 22 years into an unprecedented buildup of border enforcement resources: 21,000 Border Patrol agents, nearly 700 miles of various kinds of physical fences, a fleet of drones, high-tech electronic surveillance systems covering all major cities along the border, a gulag of immigration prisons to incarcerate apprehended migrants, and more.

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Mexican woman facing deportation marks milestone in church sanctuary: ‘It’s like I lost a year’

08/10/15 Fox News Latino

Border - Roadsign pointing between Nogales, mexico and TucsonRosa Robles Loreto could leave the small, Tucson church where she has spent the past year. But there is no guarantee she won’t be sent back to Mexico, her native country.

That’s enough to convince her to stay put, seeing her family only when they visit the church and missing her sons’ baseball games and first day at school.

She isn’t alone. Two other immigrants living in the U.S. illegally remain in churches to avoid deportation, all women who are afraid of going to their home country for different reasons. They are like many immigrants left behind by lack of immigration reform.

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What crisis? Urgency on border gone, says analyst

8/5/15 El Daily Post

Border - MexicoIn the weeks leading up to Thursday’s first debate of the 2016 presidential race, Republican candidates have sought to distinguish themselves from each other – and President Barack Obama – with ever-tougher positions on border security and illegal immigration, claiming current measures are failing.

And yet by many standards, the situation is not nearly as urgent as it was during last summer’s crisis and has improved steadily and markedly in some respects over the past decade or so – partly because of actions taken by the U.S. government, but also because of factors beyond Washington’s control.

Last year’s alarming surge of unaccompanied children and families arriving from Central America via Mexico has been cut by about half,according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, a drop-off attributed in part to a crackdown by Mexico and better enforcement along the U.S. border.

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