UN Office ‘Concerned’ Over Mexico Missing Students Case

4/26/16 ABC News

16728146101_c58b12a8bf_mThe U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights said Tuesday it is troubled by a group of international experts’ complaints of obstacles to their investigation into the disappearance of 43 students in Mexico.

Spokesman Rupert Colville said in a statement that the office is “concerned about the many challenges and obstacles reported by the experts,” including the ability to examine other lines of investigation such as military and other officials’ possible roles in the case.

He called on the Mexican government to “take into serious consideration” the recommendations of the group of experts from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

The group’s report from Sunday criticized the government’s investigation of the 2014 disappearances. It said suspects were apparently tortured and key pieces of evidence were not investigated or handled properly.

Government investigators have said the students were taken by local police in the city of Iguala, in the southern state of Guerrero, and handed over to drug gang members who killed them and burned the bodies at a trash dump.

The group of experts, known by the acronym IGIE, and a separate body made up of Argentine investigators say there is no evidence at the dump of a fire large enough to incinerate that many corpses.

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Torture of ordinary Mexicans may be shocking, but it’s not surprising Daniel Peña

4/19/16 The Guardian

Mezcala_(or_Balsas)_River_in_Guerrero,_MexicoThe now-infamous video of Mexican soldiers helping a federal police officer torture and interrogate a female suspect in Ajuchitlán del Progreso, Guerrero, this past February seems to be another confirmation that there are two classes of Mexicans. There are those who are exempt from consequences (politicians and the wealthy, including Mexico’s military elite) who operate with impunity in Mexico. And then there are the rest of us, regularly policed by force with the active participation of Mexico’s military and federal police in intimidation tactics and the violation of human rights.

The world might rightly be shocked by the way the woman in the video was asphyxiated with plastic bags, by the way she screamed as the muzzle of a gun was pressed to her skull, but every Mexican knows that this single story of torture is part of a pattern.

Just last week, Mexico’s Comisión Nacional de los Derechos Humanos confirmedthe involvement of two Mexican federal police in the disappearance of the 43 students in Ayotzinapa. In the 2014 Tlatlaya massacre, Mexican soldiers were allegedly ordered by senior officers to murder 22 civilians who had already surrendered to Mexican forces. Also that year, National Autonomous University of Mexico student and poet Sandino Bucio was arrested by plainclothes federal police, presumably for having participated in the 20 November march in Mexico City in support of the then recently disappeared Ayotzinapa students.

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KIDNAPPED JOURNALIST FOUND DEAD IN CENTRAL MEXICO

1/9/2015 Newsweek
censorshipMEXICO CITY (Reuters) – A Mexican journalist kidnapped in the violent state of Veracruz on was found dead on Tuesday, the prosecutors’ office in neighboring Puebla state said, the latest victim of a wave of attacks on reporters in the country.

Anabel Flores had been violently dragged from her home in Veracruz early on Monday morning by a group of armed men.

The attorney general’s office said on Tuesday it had asked the Defence Ministry if military officials entered her home, and if so, that they say who issued the warrant.

Her body was found on a highway in Puebla and later identified by her family, Veracruz prosecutors said.

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Drugs, Human Rights, Trade, and Distrust: The Evolution of U.S.-Mexican Relations

11/10/2015 By Tom Long, War on the Rocks

President Obama visits Mexico President Enrique Pena NietoLast month, citing human rights concerns, the United States quietly withheld about $5 million in counternarcotics assistance for Mexico. The State Department declined to certify that Mexico met conditions imposed on the aid by Congress under the Leahy Amendment, triggering the 15-percent reduction in funding for Mexican security agencies. Though more than $140 million of other U.S. funding will continue to flow, the decision — first reported by The Washington Post and confirmed by a deputy spokesman at the State Department — was cheered by human rights advocates. A senior official at Human Rights Watch told The New York Times that the cut was “unprecedented.”

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Second Ayotzinapa Kidnapping Victim Identified Through DNA Tests

9/17/2015 International Business Times

Twitter/Maeugeniaarias
Twitter/Maeugeniaaria

Mexico’s attorney general said Wednesday that forensic experts had identified a possible match for a second victim in the abduction and purported killing of 43 students last year.

There were “signs that establish a possible connection” between the remains found in plastic bags in a river and missing student Jhosivani Guerrero de la Cruz, one of the 43 students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers’ College in the city of Iguala, Attorney General Arely Gomez told reporters, according to Reuters.

The remains were identified by Austrian forensic experts from Innsbruck Medical University, who have already identified one missing student based on a bone fragment.

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Mexico’s Enrique Peña Nieto to meet with families of 43 missing students

9/13/2015 Fox News Latino

Enrique PeñaNieto 2The government, representatives of the families of the 43 education students who disappeared in southern Mexico last year and some of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, or IACHR, experts who examined the case have hammered out an agreement for a meeting between President Enrique Peña Nieto and relatives on Sept. 24, the Government Secretariat said.

“The Office of the President of the Republic will show its commitment to providing support to victims, direct and indirect, and will continue the investigation until it clears up the incident,” the secretariat said in a statement.

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Ayotzinapa case still open: Peña Nieto

9/8/2015 The Yucatan Times 

Twitter/Maeugeniaarias
Twitter/Maeugeniaarias

President Enrique Peña Nieto declared on Tuesday September 8th that the investigation into events which occurred in Iguala, Guerrero nearly a year ago is ongoing, and that the federal government will continue to look into the case until the truth about what happened to the 43 students from Ayotzinapa is revealed.

Speaking during a working tour in Puebla, the president reiterated the unwavering determination of his government to be close to the families of the students and to discover the truth about an event which has outraged and damaged Mexican society.

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