Understanding the Link Between Business and Human Rights in Mexico

08/17/16 The Huffington Post 

mexico-flagHas a corporation ever made you feel vulnerable? Have your rights been ignored? Does it seem that businesses have no oversight? Then this may be of interest to you.

In 2011, the United Nations Human Rights Council issued Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. The principles reiterate that nations must control business activities, that corporations must respect human rights, and that victims must have access to justice.

US and Mexico’s mass deportations have fueled humanitarian crisis, report says

07/27/2016 The Guardian

deportation.jpgMass deportations and inadequate asylum procedures in Mexico and the US have fueled a humanitarian crisis where desperate Central Americans seeking refuge from rampant violence are routinely preyed upon by criminal gangs and corrupt officials, according to a new report by the International Crisis Group (ICG).

The tide of people fleeing Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala – three of the five most dangerous countries in the world – continues apace despite beefed-up border control measures implemented after Barack Obama declared the 2014 surge in undocumented migrants a humanitarian crisis. Last year, Mexico deported 165,000 Central Americans, while the US expelled 75,000.

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Torture scandal in Mexico: American “nearly beaten to death”

07/13/16 The Washington Post 

MEXICO CITY — Ronald James Wooden flexes the large blacksmith’s hands with which he once forged everything from large chandeliers to intricate jewelry. He’s says he is still regaining feeling in them three years after a four-hour beating with fists and rifle butts by municipal police in southern Mexico.

The officers tightened his handcuffs and then stood on them to inflict maximum damage to his hands, said Wooden, 46, who had set up a workshop in the hills outside the silver-mining city of Taxco along with his Mexican-born wife.

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Mexico´s faces a test to end torture of women by police and military

07/12/16 Amnesty International 

AmnestyInternationalVerónica Razo, a Mexican 37-year-old mother of three is terrified of sleeping. Every night, when she lies in her bed in a small cell in Morelo’s’ federal prison, an hour outside the capital, Mexico City, her mind replays the scariest 24 hours of her life.

On 8 June 2011 federal police raped, suffocated and electrocuted her in a warehouse in Mexico City. She was tortured so badly that she almost died as a result. Police wanted her to say that she belonged to one of the brutal criminal gangs causing mayhem across the country. She has been behind bars since then.

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Classmate of Students Who Disappeared in Mexico Was Tortured, Panel Says

07/11/16 The New York Times

AyotzinapaAFP
AFP

MEXICO CITY — A classmate of 43 college students who disappeared in 2014 had been tortured before his body was found the day after the others vanished, Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission said on Monday.

A new autopsy determined that the student, Julio César Mondragón, 22, suffered 64 fractures in 40 bones, mostly in his skull, face and spine, according to José Trinidad Larrieta, who has led the commission’s investigation in the case. He said that the young man died of brain injuries.

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Canada-Mexico Cooperation on Security and Defence

06/28/2016 Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau

canadaPrime Minister Trudeau and President Peña Nieto have both underlined the importance of a renewed strategic partnership based on the principles of democracy, respect for the environment, improved economic opportunity, and respect for human rights.

In order to increase prosperity – and improve equality – for Canadians and Mexicans alike, both countries will work together to deepen cooperation to promote the safety and security of our people. This commitment focuses on all types of threats, including natural disasters, extreme weather events, crime, terrorism, and health-related problems.

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Surviving Death: Police and Military Torture of Women in Mexico

06/28/16 Amnesty International

AmnestyInternationalAn unprecedented Amnesty International investigation of 100 women arrested in Mexico reveals that they are routinely sexually abused by the security forces who want to secure confessions and boost figures in an attempt to show that they are tackling rampant organized crime.

All of the 100 women held in federal prisons who reported torture or other ill-treatment to Amnesty International said they had experienced some form of sexual harassment or psychological abuse during their arrest and interrogation by municipal, state or federal police officers or members of the Army and Navy. Seventy-two said they were sexually abused during their arrest or in the hours that followed. Thirty-three reported being raped.

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