UPCOMING EVENT | The Impact of Immigration Enforcement Policies on Teaching and Learning in America’s Public Schools

education2WHEN: Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 11:30am-1:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

 

There has been considerable discussion in news outlets about the impact of immigration enforcement policies on children and families. Recent incidents across the country and reported in the press have raised alarm throughout immigrant communities. Clearly there is great fear in this hyper-sensitized environment. To what extent is this ramped up immigration enforcement impacting our nation’s public schools? How does it vary by region and what is the “collateral” fallout for non-immigrant students? How are educators reacting and to what extent is this affecting them? What rights do students have and what happens to U.S.-citizen children when they are sent to a country and school system they do not know? To address these questions, four new research papers will be presented with brief highlights. There will be ample time for Q&A and discussion. The studies include:

•         A new national survey of the impact of immigration enforcement on teaching and learning in the nation’s schools
•         The impact of immigration enforcement on educators
•         Federal and state policy affecting the children of immigrants and their schooling
•         What happens to U.S. citizen students caught up in deportation of family members

 

A light lunch will be served at 11:30am. The program will begin at 12:00pm.

Co-sponsored by:

     

Introduction
Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Presenters
Patricia Gándara, Co-Director, Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles, UCLA

Bryant Jensen, Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University

Shena Sanchez, Research Associate, University of California, Los Angeles

Julie Sugarman, Senior Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Institute

Commentator
Lily Eskelsen Garcia, President, National Education Association

Moderator
Claudio Sanchez, Education Correspondent, National Public Radio

Click to RSVP

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Trump Plans to Meet With Pena Nieto in Coming Weeks, Mexico Says

02/14/2018 Bloomberg

PenaNietoU.S. President Donald Trump and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto plan to meet in the coming weeks to review advances in the relationship between the nations and discuss pending issues, according to Mexico’s Foreign Ministry.

The meeting comes after months of sometimes contentious talks to renegotiate the Nafta trade deal and Trump’s insistence that America’s southern neighbor pay for a border wall, a demand Mexico rejects. Pena Nieto’s party also faces a tough challenge to hang onto the presidency in a July vote, with his chosen candidate, former Finance Minister Jose Antonio Meade, running third in most polls. Pena Nieto isn’t eligible for reelection.

Building diplomacy, not just walls: U.S. starts work on new Mexico embassy

02/13/2018 Reuters

Image result for mexico city

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – The United States broke ground on a new $943 million embassy in Mexico City on Tuesday, a move hailed by officials from both countries as a win for diplomacy after months of tension over President Donald Trump’s plan to build a tall border wall.

Officials gathered for a ceremony to mark the start of construction for the sprawling embassy, which is nestled close to the headquarters of Mexico’s richest man, Carlos Slim, and scheduled for completion in 2022.

At the groundbreaking, U.S. Ambassador Roberta Jacobson underscored the importance of the bilateral relationship. “Mexico is one of the United States’ closest and most valued partners,” she said.

Read more…

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02/13/2018 CBS News

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If the aim is to pass a legislative solution, Trump will be a crucial and, at times, complicating player. His day-to-day turnabouts on the issues have confounded Democrats and Republicans and led some to urge the White House to minimize his role in the debate for fear he’ll say something that undermines the effort.

Yet his ultimate support will be vital if Congress is to overcome election-year pressures against compromise. No Senate deal is likely to see the light of day in the more conservative House without the president’s blessing and promise to sell compromise to his hard-line base.

Trump, thus far, has balked on that front.

Read more…

Mexican Consulate’s Office announces upcoming forums on NAFTA, ports of entry

02/11/2018 Rio Grande Guardian

USA and Mexico

MCALLEN, RGV – Mexico’s consul in McAllen, Eduardo Bernal Martínez, has announced two upcoming events involving the Rio Grande Valley’s international ports of entry and the North American Free Trade Agreement.

The Consulate’s Office will host a meeting in McAllen to discuss the state of the local international bridges in late February. In late March it will hold a one-day summit in Mission to discuss the importance of NAFTA.

“We want to have a constructive dialogue on these two important issues,” Bernal told the Rio Grande Guardian.

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At UCSD, experts to explore new strategies for the war on drugs

02/07/2018 The San Diego Union-Tribune

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On Friday, UC San Diego will host “Rethinking the War on Drugs and U.S.-Mexico Security Cooperation,” a conference dedicated to finding practical solutions to an intractable problem. Speakers will include a former White House adviser plus policymakers, researchers and journalists from both countries.

“The cooperation of the U.S. and Mexico is more critical now than ever,” said Rafael Fernández de Castro, director of UC San Diego’s Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies.

Read more…

Problems in the pipeline for Sempra’s subsidiary in Mexico

02/07/2018 San Diego Union-Tribune

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The disruption is one of a number of protests that have caused delays to energy projects in the country.

Four years ago, Mexican political leaders passed energy reform measures in an effort to dramatically improve the country’s power system. Only 7 percent of households in Mexico have access to natural gas.

Mexico will elect a new president in July and the front-runner has been a sharp critic of energy reform.

Read more…

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