Mexican Foreign Minister Calls Trump’s Idea of Mexico Paying for Border Wall ‘Absurd’

08/07/16 ABC News 

Claudia-Ruiz-Massieu-2Mexico’s foreign minister Claudia Ruiz Massieu dismissed Republican candidate Donald Trump’s campaign promise that her government would pay for a U.S.-Mexico border wall.

“Well, that’s absurd; we would never consider that,” Ruiz Massieu said in an interview with ABC News chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl.

“I think that’s the real issue here. It’s not a problem about a wall. It is a problem about narrow minds,” she said. “We have a very integrated economy that would suffer greatly if we place barriers into that dynamic.”

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Mexico is already the immigration ‘wall’ some politicians want

08/01/16 Los Angeles Times 

us mex flagMexico is a critical partner,” President Obama reminded reporters during a joint news conference with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto on July 22, “and is critically important to our own well-being.” The two presidents praised not only their countries’ immense cross-border trade but also bilateral collaboration on energy, the environment and counter-narcotics. Left unmentioned in their opening remarks was another crucial way Mexico is helping its northern neighbor: as a buffer between the U.S. and Central America’s Northern Triangle, where gang violence, chronic corruption and endemic poverty drives hundreds of thousands from their homes each year.

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PedWest schedule stepped up

— This month’s opening of a much-needed pedestrian border entrance from Tijuana to San Ysidro has been cause for celebration north of the border. But in Baja California, there has been mostly uproar over the quality of a temporary structure built by Mexico’s federal government to access the new U.S. PedWest facility.

After nearly two weeks of public pressure from Baja California politicians, the business community on both sides of the border and pedestrian border-crossers, Mexico’s federal government on Thursday announced that it is stepping up its construction schedule for a permanent structure. It is now slated to open in September, rather than the previously announced December opening.

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What I learned reporting on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border

 

07/26/2016 Cronkite News Arizona PBS

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Photo credit: Cronkite News

Editor’s Note: Recently, a group of Cronkite News reporters travelled along the U.S.-Mexico border to work on stories about the results of a Cronkite News-Univision News-Dallas Morning News border poll. Mauricio Casillas, a recent graduate of the Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University, was one of the reporters who contributed to our coverage. Here, he reflects on his experience as a Borderlands reporter.

Reporting on the border is unlike any other reporting I had ever done. The people, the culture, the issues — they are all unique. For instance, issues that people on the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez border face are not the same as those on the San Diego/Tijuana border. That’s why I think this kind of reporting is so important. Too often, we as journalists like to paint the entire border region with the same brush.

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Eva Longoria: ‘The Border Crossed Us’

07/25/2016 NBC News

eva longoriaTexan actress Eva Longoria spoke at the DNC about her Mexican heritage, and that her family “didn’t cross the border, it crossed us.”

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How Trump plans to build, and pay for, a wall along U.S.-Mexico border

07/26/16 POLITIFACT

Border fenceThe boldest promise of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign was also one of his first.

“I would build a great wall, and nobody builds walls better than me, believe me, and I’ll build them very inexpensively,” Trump said, announcing his candidacy on June 16, 2015. “I will build a great, great wall on our southern border. And I will have Mexico pay for that wall.”

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The economics of Donald Trump’s wall

07/26/2016 The Economist

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Photo Credit: The Economist

DONALD TRUMP is a man of ideas. Although critics have lambasted him for flip-flopping on some policies (he now proposes to ban immigrants from “terrorist nations” rather than all Muslims), Mr Trump has stood firm on at least one proposal: his wall. A new report from Bernstein Research looks at the economics of the wall’s construction.

The border between the United States and Mexico stretches 1,989 miles (3,200km), but the wall itself needn’t be as long thanks to the preponderance of natural borders such as the Rio Grande. Assuming a length of 1,000 miles and a height of 40 feet (12 metres), Bernstein reckon that the wall would require $711m worth of concrete and $240m worth of cement. Including labour, the total cost of between $15 billion and $25 billion is a bit more than Mr Trump’s suggested $10 billion. (Bernstein’s estimates presumably do not factor in Mr Trump’s construction expertise.)

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