Border apprehensions, views of immigrants, 10 demographic trends

pew hispanic trends

April 15, 2016

Apprehensions of Mexican migrants at U.S. borders reach near-historic low

The number of Mexican migrants apprehended at U.S. borders in fiscal 2015 dropped to the lowest levels in nearly 50 years. This change comes after a period in which net migration of Mexicans to the U.S. had fallen to lows not seen since the 1940s. READ MORE >

Americans’ views of immigrants marked by widening partisan, generational divides

Republicans and Democrats continue to disagree deeply over immigration policies, including how to deal with undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. and whether to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Underlying these differences is a substantial – and growing – partisan divide over whether immigrants generally are a strength or burden on the country. READ MORE >

10 demographic trends that are shaping the U.S. and the world

Americans are more racially and ethnically diverse than in the past, and the U.S. is projected to be even more diverse in the coming decades. These demographic changes are shifting the electorate – and American politics. The 2016 electorate will be the most diverse in U.S. history due to strong growth among Hispanic eligible voters, particularly U.S.-born youth.
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Demographic research: From multiracial children to gender identity, what demographers are studying now

Latinos in the 2016 Election: State Fact Sheets

The state fact sheets contain data on the size and social and economic characteristics of the Hispanic and non-Hispanic eligible voter populations. READ MORE >

April 19 primary: New York
April 19 primary: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island

Mexico looks to bolster its image in U.S.: government

4/7/16 Reuters

hand shakeMexico aims to deploy a “comprehensive strategy” to promote its image in the United States more vigorously, the government said on Thursday, days after fresh criticism of the country by Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump.

Trump, who has attacked Mexico over trade, illegal immigration and crime, on Tuesday threatened to block remittances from undocumented Mexican migrants if elected, and also slammed the announcement of a new Ford plant in Mexico.

Opposition lawmakers and diplomats have accused the Mexican government of failing to counter such rhetoric, and on Tuesday Mexico said it was replacing its U.S. ambassador and the deputy foreign minister responsible for North American relations.

Carlos Sada’s nomination as ambassador and the appointment of Paulo Carreno as deputy minister are part of a “comprehensive strategy” to ensure Mexico’s contribution across the border is better understood, a senior foreign ministry official said.

“This is just the most visible element of a strategy that will involve not just the foreign ministry, but also other ministries,” Ana Paola Barbosa, the chief of staff to Foreign Minister Claudia Ruiz Massieu, told a news conference.

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Prioridades para el nuevo embajador en Estados Unidos

4/7/2016 Animal Politico

By Duncan Wood and Viridiana Rios

us mex flagMéxico cambió su embajador en Estados Unidos, nombrando a Carlos Manuel Sada Solana. La prioridad del nuevo embajador es clara: representar a México en una forma más constructiva y positiva, sobre todo ante el congreso estadounidense, identificando a los representantes y senadores que pueden tener influencia en la relación bilateral. Esto será importante no solamente en el contexto de este año electoral, también para la relación a largo plazo.

La principal tarea del embajador Sada Solana debería ser una: no responder de forma directa al discurso antiméxico que se está detonando por el periodo electoral, sino estratégica. Se debe enfatizar la importancia de nuestra relación con Estados Unidos, y los logros significativos que ha tenido México en los últimos años. Ello incluye la aprobación de reformas, la creación del Dialogo Económico de Alto Nivel (DEAN o HLED por sus siglas en Inglés), el desarrollo de una frontera inteligente, los esfuerzos bilaterales en energía, cambio climático, crimen organizado, y migración.

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Trump reveals how he would force Mexico to pay for border wall

4/5/16 The Washington Post

8566728595_0d6365cce0_mDonald Trump says he will force Mexico to pay for a border wall as president by threatening to cut off the flow of billions of dollars in payments that immigrants send home to the country, an idea that could decimate the Mexican economy and set up an unprecedented showdown between the United States and a key diplomatic ally.

In a two-page memo to The Washington Post, Trump outlined for the first time how he would seek to force Mexico to pay for his 1,000-mile border fence, which Trump has made a cornerstone of his presidential campaign and which has been repeatedly scoffed at by current and former Mexican leaders.

The proposal would jeopardize a stream of cash that many economists say is vital for Mexico’s struggling economy. But the feasibility of Trump’s plan is unclear both legally and politically, and also would test the bounds of a president’s executive powers in seeking to pressure another country.

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A wall apart: divided families meet at a single, tiny spot on the US-Mexico border

3/29/2016 The Guardian 

By Toksave
By Toksave

There are 1,954 miles of border separating the US and Mexico but only one tiny stretch, measuring no more than 15 meters wide, where families are sanctioned to touch fingertips through a steel-mesh fence.

This spot, where the Pacific ocean joins the sandy shoreline, and where San Diego becomes Tijuana, is where US Customs and Border Protection allows families torn apart by an unforgiving immigration system their own, fleeting connection.

It is a wafer-thin and slowly shrinking no man’s land, where border agents will look the other way as Mexican-American families with mixed legal status convene in the baking sun.

In an election year which has been dominated by hardline anti-immigration and anti-Mexican rhetoric, the encounters along this tiny segment of border have been given a new sense of urgency.

The Republican frontrunner Donald Trump and his main challenger Ted Cruz are both campaigning on the promise of turning the reinforced fence that separates the US from Mexico into a wall.

Any such move would have very practical repercussions for people like Jonathan Magdaleno, a 25-year-old who was on the US side of the fence one recent Saturday, his palms against the warm metal grill.

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Nafta May Have Saved Many Autoworkers’ Jobs

3/29/16 New York Times

TLC_mapWhen Donald Trump threatened to “break” the North American Free Trade Agreement, auto industry workers offered up some of the loudest cheers.

Mr. Trump easily won the Republican primary in Michigan this month. The state, home base for the American auto industry, also delivered an upset victory to Bernie Sanders, the Democratic anti-Nafta standard-bearer.

But the autoworkers’ animosity is aiming at the wrong target. There are still more than 800,000 jobs in the American auto sector. And there is a good case to be made that without Nafta, there might not be much left of Detroit at all.

“Without the ability to move lower wage jobs to Mexico we would have lost the whole industry,” said Gordon Hanson of the University of California, San Diego, who has been studying the impact of Nafta on industries and workers since its inception more than two decades ago.

Even in the narrowest sense — to protect jobs in car assembly plants — a wall of tariffs against America’s southern neighbor would probably do more harm than good.

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Five former presidents demand an end to the war on drugs

3/24/16 The Economist

drug_war_02AS THE drug war has rumbled on, with little to show for all the money and violence, its critics have become a more diverse bunch than the hippies and libertarians who first backed drug reform. The latest broadside against prohibition was fired on March 24th by a group of former heads of state and businesspeople, who put forward a sober case for rethinking the international approach to drug control.

“Ending the War on Drugs” is a collection of essays by former presidents of Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, Nigeria and Switzerland, as well as a former deputy prime minister of Britain and assorted scientific folk. George Soros, a financier who has bankrolled many pro-legalisation pressure groups, provides a chapter; the book carries an introduction by Richard Branson, a business mogul whose company, Virgin, is its publisher. All condemn what they see as a political, economic and public-health failure.

The arguments are well-rehearsed but bear repeating, especially when made by such a diverse and level-headed group. In spite of its vast cost to taxpayers (estimated by the authors at $100 billion per year) the war against drugs has failed to stop people taking them, instead driving up the price of narcotics to the point where they generate upwards of $300 billion a year for their dealers and traffickers. More than 1.4m drug arrests are made each year in America alone, and they are unevenly distributed, with black Americans jailed for drug offences at ten times the rate of whites, the authors write.

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