Who Are The Biggest Players In Mexico City’s Media Market?

07/29/15 Forbes

tvMexico City media landscape has evolved rapidly over the last 20 years. While some critics still complain that TV giants such as Televisa and TV Azteca focus more on supporting the official government view than engaging in critical investigative journalism, gone are the days when all newspapers relied on government ad revenue and paper from a state-owned company.

Read more…

Fired Mexico Radio Host Suffers Legal Setback in Reinstatement Bid

Fox News Latino, 4/23/2015

carmen-aristeguiPopular Mexican radio and TV host Carmen Aristegui suffered a setback in her bid for reinstatement by MVS Radio when a court ruled that the outlet has no obligation to reach an accord with the fired investigative journalist.

The Federal Judiciary Council, or CJF, the top administrative body of Mexico’s judiciary, said in a statement that the Mexico City court on Wednesday unanimously overturned a judge’s April 13 ruling that required MVS to sit down with Aristegui and reach an agreement on their contractual differences.

That meeting was to have taken place on Friday in the presence of mediator Jose Woldenberg, but the new ruling cancels that scheduled sit-down.

Read more…

Media reports say Mexican police were involved in January killings

Reuters, 4/19/2015

gun - crime sceneThree media outlets said on Sunday that Mexican federal police killed 16 unarmed people in two separate attacks in January, appearing to contradict an account by the federal government that the deaths could have been caused by friendly fire.

Aristegui Noticias, Univision and Proceso published similar accounts of the deaths in Apatzingan in the restive western state of Michoacan. They were the latest reports to allege abuses by security forces in the country.

Read more…

In Mexico, Firing of Carmen Aristegui Highlights Rising Pressures on News Media

By Elisabeth Malkin, The New York Times, 3/27/2015

newspapers thumbnailMEXICO CITY — When Carmen Aristegui, Mexico’s most famous radio personality, was abruptly fired this month, nobody expected her to go quietly. But anger over her dismissal has been rising steadily, and it has turned up the heat in this country’s charged political atmosphere.

Conspiracy theories have abounded since a dispute between Ms. Aristegui and her employer, MVS Communications, ended in her departure. She has become an emblem of press freedom under siege, and social media has lighted up with demands for her return to the airwaves.

Read more… 

Mexico airline apologizes for light-skin casting call for TV commercial

people with question marksThe Washington Post, 8/16/2013

Mexico’s Aeromexico airline and its ad agency have apologized for a producer’s casting call requesting that only light-skinned people apply as actors for a television commercial.

Mexico’s population is largely dark-skinned, but Mexican television ads routinely feature light-skinned actors, sparking accusations of racial discrimination. The commercial has not yet been made, but the casting call specified it wanted “nobody dark skinned,” only actors with “white skin.”

Read more…

How Mexico Became So Corrupt

cross my fingersThe Atlantic, 6/25/2013

Grupo Televisa, the world’s largest Spanish-language media company, is famous for its logo, a gold-colored eye gazing at the world through a television screen. According to The Guardian, this logo “captures the company’s success at controlling and dominating what Mexicans watch”. In a country where newspaper readership is tiny and the reach of the Internet and cable is still largely limited to the middle classes, Televisa — and its rival TV Azteca — exert a powerful influence over national politics. Through its scores of stations and repeater towers, the former accounts for roughly two-thirds of the nation’s free-to-air television; most of the rest belong to Azteca.

Accused for decades of politically slanted news coverage, Televisa represents another rarely spoken fact: modern Mexico has never functioned without corruption, and its current system would either collapse or change beyond recognition if it tried to do so. Just before the 2012 elections, Mexican news magazine Proceso and The Guardian released evidence of a series of shady deals struck between Televisa and the nation’s powerful Institutional Revolutionary Party (the “PRI”).

Read more…

Why Mexico Will Be Latin America’s Tech Leader

typing on computer keyboardABC News/Univision, 6/25/2013

A global race is on to create the next Silicon Valley, and Latin America is rapidly embracing technology and innovation as it vies to be the epicenter of the next tech boom. The stakes aren’t trivial. It’s clear that the countries that can develop new ideas and technology will be the economic winners of the 21st century. That’s why the Brazilian government, for instance, recently launched Startup Brazil, a business accelerator that aims to attract local and foreign talent to build tech companies in Brazil.

The program, which will provide entrepreneurs with up to $100,000 in grant money as well as office space and access to investors, is modeled after Startup Chile, the pioneering business accelerator launched by the Chilean government a few years ago. Chile was the first Latin American country to focus on attracting startups and developing an ecosystem of innovators. Other countries in the region, like Colombia and Peru, have followed their lead.

Read more…