Call for Summer 2017 Internship Applications

The Mexico Institute Seeks Summer 2017 Interns. There are different intern positions, please specify which you are applying for. Please review full guidelines and application instructions. Applications should be received no later than March 25, 2017. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

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Outreach and Communications Intern

Opening Date: Summer 2017

Deadline: March 25, 2017

Internship Description: The Mexico Institute is looking for an intern to aid in the implementation of the Mexico Institute’s communications and social media strategy. These internships are designed to provide the individuals selected with the opportunity for practical experience in an environment that successfully mixes academic study with public policy. Interns will gain valuable experience in a variety of projects such as managing the Mexico Institute’s social media accounts, creating infographics, providing research support for op-eds and other publications, conference/event organization, and other traditional media outreach. The Intern will be responsible for updating the Mexico Institute blog and social media accounts, preparing daily news clippings, researching for and creating infographics to promote topics/recent events in U.S.-Mexico relations, as well as upcoming events and publications, and aiding with other office activities. The Intern will help manage and explore other outreach strategies, such as the use of video, and will work on various projects related to: Security & Rule of Law, Economics & Competitiveness and Innovation, Energy, Border Issues, and Migration & Migrants.

Eligibility Requirements: Successful applicants should have strong research and administrative skills, be detail-oriented, be able to work independently and collectively as part of a group, and be currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree program, a recent graduate (within the last year), and/or have been accepted to enter an advanced degree program. Strong writing skills and language ability in both English and Spanish are preferred. Experience with graphic design (Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, and/or Photoshop), video (YouTube, Facebook Live, Whiteboard), translation experience and knowledge of Mexico will be considered assets. This is a paid internship.

Application Instructions: To apply, send resume, cover letter, a 3-5 page writing sample, and 1-2 examples of infographics. Clearly state your availability and desired schedule in your application. All materials should be submitted together to Mexico@wilsoncenter.org. In the subject line, please use the following format: Last name, Outreach and Communications Internship Application. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered. Due to the number of applications received, only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

For more information about the Mexico Institute and the Woodrow Wilson Center, visit our website.

International students are eligible, but they must hold a valid F-1 or J-1 visa and appropriate work authorization especially if they are receiving compensation for the internships. All international students must obtain written permission from their Designated School Official or Responsible Visa Officer at their university stating that they are in valid immigration status and eligible to do an internship at the Center. The Wilson Center is an equal opportunity employer and follows equal opportunity employment guidelines in the selection of its interns.

 

Graduate Research Intern

Opening Date: Summer 2017

Deadline: March 25, 2017

Internship Description: The Mexico Institute is looking for a graduate intern with strong quantitative and qualitative research skills. This internship is designed to provide the individuals selected with the opportunity for practical experience in an environment that successfully mixes academic study with public policy. Interns will gain valuable experience in a variety of projects such as public policy research and analysis; conference organization; editing and publishing reports, and other support of Center activities.

Eligibility Requirements: Successful applicants should have strong research skills, be detail-oriented, and be able to work independently and as part of a group. Applicants must be currently enrolled in a graduate degree program, a recent graduate (within the last year), and/or have been accepted to enter an advanced degree program. Strong writing skills and language ability in both English and Spanish are preferred. Knowledge and research experience on trade and economics, Mexico, and U.S.-Latin America relations  are highly preferred. This is a paid internship.

Application Instructions: To apply, send resume, cover letter, and a 3-5 page writing sample. Clearly state your availability and desired schedule in your application. All materials should be submitted together to Mexico@wilsoncenter.org. In the subject line, please use the following format: Last Name, Graduate Research Internship Application. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered. Due to the number of applications received, only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

For more information about the Mexico Institute and the Woodrow Wilson Center, visit our website.

International students are eligible, but they must hold a valid F-1 or J-1 visa and appropriate work authorization especially if they are receiving compensation for the internships. All international students must obtain written permission from their Designated School Official or Responsible Visa Officer at their university stating that they are in valid immigration status and eligible to do an internship at the Center. The Wilson Center is an equal opportunity employer and follows equal opportunity employment guidelines in the selection of its interns.

Police Find 5 Burned Bodies in Southern Mexico

3/10/2017 Latin American Herald

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Flickr/Gustavo Serrano

CHILPANCINGO, Mexico – Police found five burned bodies outside the southern Mexican city of Chilapa de Alvarez, where 13 bags containing human remains were discovered earlier in the week, Guerrero state Attorney General’s Office spokesmen told EFE on Thursday.

Authorities were notified around 11:00 pm Wednesday that a vehicle was burning in Calzada de la Virgen on the road to the community of Ajacayan, the AG’s office said.

Officers responding to the call found five bodies inside the vehicle.

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Mexico condemns Trump administration proposal to separate families crossing border

3/9/2017 The Hill

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Getty Images

Mexico’s top diplomat condemned the potential separation of families caught trying to cross the border into the United States after meeting with top U.S. officials.

In a meeting with top White House officials, Mexican Secretary of Foreign Relations Luis Videgaray called a proposal to separate children and parents caught entering the United States illegally unacceptable.

Videgaray said in a press conference Thursday he’d informed National Security Adviser Gen. H.R. McMaster, chief economic advisor Gary Cohn and senior adviser Jared Kushner that Mexico was open to constructive dialogue as long as the human rights of its citizens were respected by U.S. authorities.

“We believe that to separate families at their arrival, independently of the reasons that may motivate this policy, represents an attack against the integrity of the fundamental unit of social life that is family,” Videgaray said.

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Looking for a Left Turn in Mexico

3/7/2017 The North American Congress on Latin America

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Flickr/Eneas de Troya

On February 12th of this year, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, leader of the new Movimiento de Regeneración Nacional (Movement for National Regeneration, MORENA) spoke to hundreds of followers at the historic Plaza Olvera in downtown Los Angeles. The reverence he evokes among his followers was on full display at the event; some people reported they drove hundreds of miles with their children so they could listen to AMLO, as he is popularly known. His visit to Los Angeles marked an opening gambit in what, by all accounts, will be a hard fought contest to determine Mexico’s next president on July 1, 2018.

López Obrador’s visit to Los Angeles underscores that preparations for the Mexican presidential elections are clearly underway. The former head of the government of Mexico City (2000-2005) and presidential candidate in 2006 and 2012 leads a crowded list of contenders who are testing the electoral waters.

Other potential presidential candidates who have surfaced include Margarita Zavala Gómez, wife of former president Felipe Calderón (2006-2012), Ricardo Anaya Cortés, the president of the Partido Acción Nacional (Party of National Action, PAN), Miguel Ángel Mancera, the current head of the Mexico City government, Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong, the minister of interior in the present government of Enrique Peña Nieto (EPN), and Jaime Rodríguez “El Bronco” Calderón, a so-called independent governor of the northern state of Nuevo León. For its part, the Congreso Nacional Indígena (National Indigenous Congress, CNI) and its allies have indicated that they will run a yet to be determined Indigenous woman for president.

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An Aquatic Paradise in Mexico, Pushed to the Edge of Extinction

2/22/2017 New York Times

xochimilcoXOCHIMILCO, Mexico — With their gray-green waters and blue herons, the canals and island farms of Xochimilco in southern Mexico City are all that remain of the extensive network of shimmering waterways that so awed Spanish invaders when they arrived here 500 years ago.

But the fragility of this remnant of pre-Columbian life was revealed last month, when a 20-feet-deep hole opened in the canal bed, draining water and alarming hundreds of tour boat operators and farmers who depend on the waterways for a living.

The hole intensified a simmering conflict over nearby wells, which suck water from Xochimilco’s soil and pump it to other parts of Mexico City. It also revived worries about a process of decline, caused by pollution, urban encroachment and subsidence, that residents and experts fear may destroy the canals in a matter of years.

“This is a warning,” said Sergio Raúl Rodríguez Elizarrarás, a geologist at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. “We are driving the canals towards their extinction.”

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Americans’ Favorable Views of Mexico Highest Since 2006

2/22/2017 Gallup

Arrow Graph by Flickr user nDevilTV http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3401/3491395689_fe1d2050fb.jpgWASHINGTON, D.C. — As President Donald Trump sets his sights on building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, Americans have a more favorable view of Mexico than they have in over a decade. Sixty-four percent of Americans say they have “very” or “mostly” favorable views of the country, up from 59% in 2016 and the highest since 2006.

Mexico’s latest favorable rating, recorded in Gallup’s annual World Affairs poll, conducted Feb. 1-5, is not the highest in Gallup’s trend. Higher percentages of Americans, ranging from 67% to 74%, looked favorably on their southern neighbor from 2001 to 2005, when President George W. Bush and Mexican President Vicente Fox enjoyed a warm relationship.

After peaking at 74% in 2003 and 2005, Americans’ positive views of Mexico fell to 64% in 2006 amid heightened publicity about drug and gang wars and issues related to near-record-high illegal immigration from Mexico into the U.S. Favorable views of the country continued to wane for another five years, bottoming out at 45% in 2011 — the lowest rating for Mexico since 1993, just before Californians passed a high-profile anti-immigrant ballot measure. Since 2011, Mexico’s image has gradually improved, rising 19 percentage points.

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A Mexican populist rises to face Trump’s America

2/16/2017 The Washington Post

Abel Flores, a 45-year-old day laborer, left central Mexico three decades ago and has not voted regularly in its elections. And yet, as the sun was setting on a recent evening, he was jammed with hundreds of Mexican Americans into a tree-shaded Los Angeles plaza to cheer on a rabble-rousing politician who could take Mexico in a very different direction.

“I don’t normally do this kind of thing,” Flores said, referring to the rally for Andrés Manuel López Obrador, widely known as AMLO. But the day laborer felt Mexico was threatened by President Trump, who has vowed to build a border wall and renegotiate the historic free-trade agreement with the United States.

“AMLO is the only person who can do anything to protect Mexico,” Flores declared.

The outrage in Mexico over Trump’s proposals has elevated a longtime politician who has unnerved the country’s business community with his nationalist views and leftist rhetoric. Political opponents have compared López Obrador with the late Hugo Chávez, a strongman who steered Venezuela toward socialism. While that may be an exaggeration, López Obrador, 63, can bring thousands into the streets on command. His critics worry that his penchant for stubborn resistance could provoke confrontation with the United States, while his fans see him as a defender of the common man.

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