UPCOMING EVENT | The Impact of Immigration Enforcement Policies on Teaching and Learning in America’s Public Schools

education2WHEN: Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 11:30am-1:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP


There has been considerable discussion in news outlets about the impact of immigration enforcement policies on children and families. Recent incidents across the country and reported in the press have raised alarm throughout immigrant communities. Clearly there is great fear in this hyper-sensitized environment. To what extent is this ramped up immigration enforcement impacting our nation’s public schools? How does it vary by region and what is the “collateral” fallout for non-immigrant students? How are educators reacting and to what extent is this affecting them? What rights do students have and what happens to U.S.-citizen children when they are sent to a country and school system they do not know? To address these questions, four new research papers will be presented with brief highlights. There will be ample time for Q&A and discussion. The studies include:

•         A new national survey of the impact of immigration enforcement on teaching and learning in the nation’s schools
•         The impact of immigration enforcement on educators
•         Federal and state policy affecting the children of immigrants and their schooling
•         What happens to U.S. citizen students caught up in deportation of family members


A light lunch will be served at 11:30am. The program will begin at 12:00pm.

Co-sponsored by:


Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Patricia Gándara, Co-Director, Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles, UCLA

Bryant Jensen, Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University

Shena Sanchez, Research Associate, University of California, Los Angeles

Julie Sugarman, Senior Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Institute

Lily Eskelsen Garcia, President, National Education Association

Claudio Sanchez, Education Correspondent, National Public Radio

Click to RSVP


UPCOMING EVENT | Los Zetas Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

9781477312742WHEN: Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 9:00-11:00 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center


Los Zetas where once Mexico’s most feared criminal organization dominating important smuggling routes from Central America into the United States. Their success was based in part on a business model that combined brute strength and predatory business practices. Join us for a discussion with the author of a new book, Los Zetas, Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico and a panel of experts on the nature of criminal enterprise and the challenges of controlling illicit economies.


Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Associate Professor at the Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University; Global Fellow, Wilson Center


Vanda Felbab Brown, Senior Fellow, Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, Foreign Policy Program, Brookings Institution

Steven Dudley, Co-director, InSight Crime

Nicholas Miroff, National Security Correspondent, The Washington Post


Eric L. Olson, Senior Adviser, Mexico Institute; Deputy Director, Latin American Program Wilson Center


UPCOMING EVENT | A Critical Juncture: Public Opinion and U.S.-Mexico Relations

USA and Mexico

WHEN: Thursday, January 18, 2018

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center


The Wilson Center and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs are pleased to invite you to an event on public opinion on U.S.-Mexico relations. Over the last two to three decades, public opinion in the bilateral relationship has risen and fallen, and U.S.-Mexico relations have hit a rough patch since the election of Donald Trump. Today, Mexican public opinion of the United States has fallen to a historic low; however, U.S. opinion of Mexico is quite strong and on the rise.

Join us as we discuss two reports on U.S.-Mexico public opinion. The first, A Critical Juncture: Public Opinion in U.S.-Mexico Relations, reviews U.S. and Mexican perceptions of their neighboring country, first looking at broad attitudes and then delving into important topics in the bilateral relationship. The second, a report by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, and Buendía & Laredo, For the First Time, A Majority of Mexicans Hold Unfavorable Views of United States, examines the phenomenon of declining Mexican public opinion of the United States, while American views of Mexico have become more favorable since all-time lows recorded in 2013. With NAFTA negotiations in the background, both Mexicans and Americans have come to believe that NAFTA has been beneficial to their countries.


Moderator: Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute

Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute

Dina Smeltz, Senior Fellow on Public Opinion and Foreign Policy, Chicago Council on Global Affairs

Esteban Guzmán Saucedo, Project Director, Buendía & Laredo



‘Canta y no llores’ — ‘Sing and don’t cry.’ Mexico rebounds from earthquake aftermath with a renewed sense of national pride

9/25/2017 Los Angeles Times

Mexican flags poke from near the rubble piles of what were once homes, shops and offices.

A group of youthful cheerleaders marches down a street, clapping their hands while rhythmically chanting, “Mexico! Mexico!”

Bystanders gathered at the site of a flattened office building break into an impromptu rendition of “Cielito Lindo,” the iconic Mexican song, with its adversity-calming refrain: “Ay, ay, ay ay. Canta y no llores” — “Sing and don’t cry.”

Read more…

After Mexico Earthquake, Tremors of Anxiety

9/25/2017 The New York Times

Phantom earthquakes strike in the middle of the night, forcing the dreamers out of bed and into a state of panic. Others, their bodies running on five days of adrenaline, find sleeping and even eating impossible. False news reports ricochet through social media, fueled by fear.

While Mexico City’s physical recovery following last Tuesday’s earthquake is well underway, as streets and businesses open and the heaving rhythm of the capital returns, the mental recovery is only just starting. A manic dread hangs over the city as people wrestle with the lost comforts they once enjoyed in their neighborhoods and, more broadly, their lives.

There are reminders everywhere: buildings buckling, floes of concrete and brick spilling across sidewalks, familiar streets bifurcated by strands of red and yellow emergency tape and patrolled by soldiers in uniform. Service tents brim with volunteers, looking for ways to help, to turn angst into action.

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Mexico rescinds Texas aid offer after huge quake

09/11/2017 Reuters

cruz rojaMEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexico has withdrawn its offer to aid victims of Hurricane Harvey in Texas due to demands on its emergency services from a massive earthquake that struck late last week, the foreign ministry said in a statement on Monday.

Mexico’s government offered to send food, beds, generators, mobile kitchens as well as doctors after torrential rains from Harvey flooded vast parts of Houston.

But the earthquake that struck southern Mexico on Thursday killed at least 96 people and left some 2.5 million people in need of aid. Hurricane Katia also hit the Gulf state of Veracruz this weekend and heavy rains have stretched emergency services.

“Given these circumstance, the Mexican government will channel all available logistical support to serve the families and communities affected in the national territory,” the foreign ministry statement said.

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Thousands of homes wrecked by huge Mexican quake, death toll at 91

09/11/2017 Reuters

chiapasMEXICO CITY (Reuters) – A massive earthquake off southern Mexico on Thursday night that killed at least 91 people damaged tens of thousands of homes and afflicted upwards of two million people in the poorer south, state officials said, as more details of the disaster emerged.


The 8.1 magnitude quake off the coast of Chiapas state was stronger than a 1985 temblor that flattened swaths of Mexico City and killed thousands. However, its greater depth and distance helped save the capital from more serious damage.

On Saturday, authorities in the southern state of Oaxaca said there were 71 confirmed fatalities there, many of them in the town of Juchitan, where the rush to bury victims crowded a local cemetery at the weekend.

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