Mexico Prepares to Counter ‘the Trump Emergency’

5/22/2016 The New York Times

Border - Mexico

MEXICO CITY — Vicente Fox, the former president of Mexico, was recently stuck in Mexico City traffic, overcome with frustration — not by the congestion, but by something that was irritating him even more: Donald J. Trump. He grabbed his phone, turned the lens on himself and pressed record.

“Ha! Donald,” Mr. Fox said, holding the phone perhaps a little too close to his face. “What about your apologies to Mexico, to Mexicans in the United States, to Mexicans in Mexico?”

In short order, the 15-second clip was on Mr. Fox’s Twitter feed — another salvo in a personal campaign against the American presidential candidate that has included television appearances, radio interviews and a fusillade of hectoring Twitter posts.

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A surprising World Cup bid could pull the U.S. and Mexico closer together

5/16/2016 Fusion

4749167384_e64c120cd2_mThere’s a sporting chance that the beautiful game could help unify Mexico and the U.S. at a time when some politicians are trying to drive the two countries apart with anti-immigration rhetoric and plans to build walls.

Calls for the U.S. and Mexico to co-host the 2026 FIFA World Cup are not new, and joint bids have happened before. In 2002 Korea and Japan joined forces to host the global tournament, and The Netherlands recently teamed up with Belgium for a failed joint bid to host the 2018 World Cup, which will be played in Russia.

But buzz for a potential U.S.-Mexico bid has grown this month following the 66th FIFA Congress held in Mexico City, where officials from both soccer federations held meetings on the subject, according to ESPN.

“It could be a positive move for the game in both countries, and it’s also a very exciting proposition for FIFA. We will now go away and formulate a timetable for further discussions,” John Motta, a board member of the U.S. Soccer Federation, told ESPN.

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From Obstacle to Asset: Re-envisioning the U.S.-Mexico Border

4/19/2016 Forbes

By Christopher Wilson and Erik Lee

forbesThe U.S.-Mexico border has yet again made an appearance in the political theater of the U.S. presidential campaign, starring in its traditional supporting role as a stock villain character. Though the political dialogue sounds like a re-reading of a script written in the 1990s or early 2000s when Mexican migration peaked, the discussion on the ground in most—but not all—U.S.-Mexico border communities long ago moved on to regional economic development. It is a largely positive discussion that could not be more different than what we are hearing at the national level.

Throughout the border region, local leaders from the public and private sectors are asking themselves how they can form cross-border partnerships to leverage assets in their sister cities and strengthen their local economies. They are looking to create a border that connects the United States to Mexico at least as much as it divides our two nations. A close look at the economic data, however, reveals divergent local economies and major border barriers. In our recent report, Competitive Border Communities: Mapping and Developing U.S.-Mexico Transborder Industries, we found that while advanced manufacturing industries such as  aerospace, automotive and medical devices often predominate in Mexican border communities, RV parks, retail and freight transportation are often the most concentrated (and often low-paying) industries in U.S. border communities.

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Border apprehensions, views of immigrants, 10 demographic trends

pew hispanic trends

April 15, 2016

Apprehensions of Mexican migrants at U.S. borders reach near-historic low

The number of Mexican migrants apprehended at U.S. borders in fiscal 2015 dropped to the lowest levels in nearly 50 years. This change comes after a period in which net migration of Mexicans to the U.S. had fallen to lows not seen since the 1940s. READ MORE >

Americans’ views of immigrants marked by widening partisan, generational divides

Republicans and Democrats continue to disagree deeply over immigration policies, including how to deal with undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. and whether to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Underlying these differences is a substantial – and growing – partisan divide over whether immigrants generally are a strength or burden on the country. READ MORE >

10 demographic trends that are shaping the U.S. and the world

Americans are more racially and ethnically diverse than in the past, and the U.S. is projected to be even more diverse in the coming decades. These demographic changes are shifting the electorate – and American politics. The 2016 electorate will be the most diverse in U.S. history due to strong growth among Hispanic eligible voters, particularly U.S.-born youth.
READ MORE >
Demographic research: From multiracial children to gender identity, what demographers are studying now

Latinos in the 2016 Election: State Fact Sheets

The state fact sheets contain data on the size and social and economic characteristics of the Hispanic and non-Hispanic eligible voter populations. READ MORE >

April 19 primary: New York
April 19 primary: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island

The Border Walls Donald Trump Supports Have Led To Thousands Of Deaths In Arizona

3/23/16 International Business Times

8566728595_0d6365cce0_mRepublican White House hopeful Donald Trump stood in front of an outsize American flag Sunday in Fountain Hills, Arizona, and repeated a central promise of his presidential campaign that hits close to home in the Southwestern state.

“We’re going to build the wall, and we’re going to stop it. It’s going to end,” Trump said, referring to his stance on illegal immigration. “We’re going to have a big, beautiful wall.”

Trump has made building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico a cornerstone of his campaign, but his message on the stump fails to mention that existing barriers along the border in the Southwest have contributed to what activists have described as a growing humanitarian crisis. Fences erected in Texas, California and Arizona have led to the deaths of thousands of immigrants as vulnerable people have been pushed out into the inhospitable desert on their trek between the two countries even as the overall rate of illegal border crossing has dropped during the past eight years.

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Stop Trump Movement Gets Boost From Mexico’s Efforts in U.S.

3/22/16 Bloomberg

Trump Peace

Mexico is mounting an unprecedented effort to turn its permanent residents in the U.S. into citizens, a status that would enable them to vote — presumably against Donald Trump.

Officially, Mexico says it respects U.S. sovereignty and has no strategy to influence the result of the presidential race. Yet Mexican diplomats are mobilizing for the first time to assist immigrants in gaining U.S. citizenship, hosting free workshops on naturalization.

“This is a historic moment where the Mexican consulate will open its doors to carry out these types of events in favor of the Mexican community,” Adrian Sosa, a spokesman for the consulate in Chicago, said before an event on March 19. In Dallas, about 250 permanent residents attended the consulate’s first “citizenship clinic” in February and another 150 in its second in March. In Las Vegas, the turnout topped 500.

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Cruz tours U.S.-Mexico border

Cruz-Headshot3/21/2016 AP

Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz toured Arizona’s border with Mexico Friday and then turned his attention to voters in Phoenix at a rally at a Christian college that brought out thousands of committed and potential supporters.

The Arizona travels for the Texas senator began with a group of ranchers at the border near Douglas just days before the state’s voters go to the polls. He marveled at the flimsy fence that separates the two countries at that point.

“My 5-year-old could climb this in about three seconds,” Cruz said as the local sheriff and a rancher gave him the tour. “’’President Obama tells us the border’s secure. Well, I invite him to move the White House down to the southern border.”

Taking a page from GOP candidate Donald Trump’s campaign playbook, he vowed as president to “solve this problem and the border will be secure.”

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