Mexico president, missing students’ relatives at odds after meeting

October 30, 2014

10/29/14 Los Angeles Times

Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

More than a month after 43 college students were led away by police and never seen again, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto on Wednesday met with relatives of the missing men in a bid to shore up flagging public faith in the search. But the families apparently turned the tables on the normally well-choreographed president, rejecting his proposed approach and refusing to leave his headquarters in Mexico City for more than six hours. Peña Nieto went on TV to promise a 10-point plan to find the students and address other grievances, while the families angrily denounced what they saw as official negligence. “All the powers of state, and they cannot find our children,” a father said at a chaotic news conference after the meeting.

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Filled with artifacts, ancient Mexican tunnel may lead to royal tombs

October 30, 2014

10/29/14 Reuters

Teotihuacan by Flikr user Laura RushA sacred tunnel discovered in the ancient Mexican city of Teotihuacan is filled with thousands of ritual objects and may lead to royal tombs, the lead Mexican archaeologist on the project said on Wednesday. The entrance to the 1,800-year-old tunnel was first discovered in 2003, and its contents came to light thanks to excavations by remote-control robots and then human researchers, archeologist Sergio Gomez told reporters. The site is located about 30 miles (50 km) northeast of Mexico City. The ruins have long been shrouded in mystery because its inhabitants did not leave behind written records. The artifacts found inside the tunnel, located below the Temple of the Plumed Serpent, include finely carved stone sculptures, jewelry and shells.

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Mexico’s First Lady of Murder Is on the Lam

October 30, 2014

10/29/14 The Daily Beast

H. Ayuntamiento Municipal de Iguala

Maria de los Angeles Pineda / H. Ayuntamiento Municipal de Iguala

Tuesday saw Mexican security forces digging near a garbage dump, excavating yet another unmarked grave with the hope of finally finding 43 student teachers who went missing after a protest last month amid reports of a massacre  carried out by the local police. And the hunt was continuing for the most wanted woman in Mexico, the woman said to have given the Iguala police chief a fateful order when she mistakenly imagined the students might disrupt a party she was throwing in honor of herself. “Teach them a lesson.” The order purportedly came from Maria de los Angeles Pineda Villa, wife of the mayor of Iguala and by numerous accounts the person really in charge. “The key operator,” Sidronio Casarrubias Salgado of the Guerreros Unidos gang recently said of her status in the town’s underworld.

 

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Pemex Sees Return to Profit With Crude Set to Recover

October 30, 2014

10/29/14 Bloomberg

Pemex LogoPetroleos Mexicanos signaled a return to profitability by the end of next year as the opening up of Mexico’s oil industry to private capital lifts the state-owned company’s production and reduces its tax burden. A 21 percent slump in the price of crude this year won’t damp Pemex’s plans to bring in partners for 10 of its existing blocks and bid for new areas on offer next year, Chief Executive Officer Emilio Lozoya said in an interview today. Facing eight straight quarters of losses, deteriorating output and a lack of resources to develop new finds, the former World Economic Forum executive is in talks with major producers as Mexico accelerates the industry overhaul that also includes lowering tax rates for Pemex. Speaking on Bloomberg Television’s “The Pulse,” he said crude will recover as demand picks up and deposits become harder to find and develop.

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Andrew Selee: Bloodshed and Resilience in Mexico

October 29, 2014

10/28/14 Dallas News

The Associated Press October 22, 2014

The Associated Press October 22, 2014

A few weeks ago, 43 students at a teachers college in Mexico’s southern state of Guerrero disappeared. From what we know so far, police in the city of Iguala handed them over to a local drug gang, affiliated with the mayor, and they were almost certainly killed. Public authorities have yet to locate the graves where the students are buried, but in searching for them they have turned up several other mass graves that testify to the gruesome gangland war going on around the city over the past few years. Mexicans have reacted with understandable horror and nationwide protests against the wave of violence that still simmers in many parts of their country. The political fallout so far has included Guerrero Gov. Angel Aguirre, who effectively stepped down under pressure.

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In Mexico, a New Lead on Missing Students

October 29, 2014

10/28/14 New York Times

machine gun“For a year now, violence and crime have really spiked,” he said. “People cannot travel the roads by night because you always see gunmen on the roads, armed people just watching you.” Still, even in a town that had become inured to kidnappings, “we are not used to the police or narcos killing students,” he said. “That’s just ugly.” The disappearance has created a political dilemma for President Enrique Peña Nieto, who has sought to play down the issue of drug violence while he tries to focus on the economy. Yet the search for the students has consumed Mexican public opinion. Their disappearance has set off violent protests in the state of Guerrero, where they were arrested, and demonstrations in much of the country.

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Mexico focuses on new mass grave in students’ disappearance

October 29, 2014

10/28/14 Los Angeles Times

776px-Cocula_GuerreroMexican authorities Tuesday announced the arrest of another suspect in the disappearance of 43 college students and said they were working with the most solid clues to date in finding the youths’ whereabouts — centering on a mass grave at a trash dump near the city of Iguala. The latest arrest brings to 57 the number of people detained in connection with the Sept. 26 incident in which the students were last seen being led away by local police after a clash that killed six people. Two of the most recently captured suspects confessed to “direct participation” in the disappearances, Mexican Atty. Gen. Jesus Murillo Karam said, without offering details. Their information, he said, led investigators to the dump outside the town of Cocula, about 15 miles southwest of Iguala in rugged, hostile terrain in Guerrero state.

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