Black Gold Next Frontier for Top Billionaires: Corporate Mexico

February 26, 2015

02/26/15 Bloomberg 

532687354_fdef042d72_zMexico’s top three billionaires — Carlos Slim, Alberto Bailleres, and German Larrea — dominate the country’s telecommunications, mining and retail industries. Next up on their priority list: oil. Slim, Bailleres and Larrea, Mexico’s three richest men according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, have created branches within their holding companies to compete in the oil and natural gas industries as the country’s government-run energy monopolies end. Bailleres’s Grupo Bal, which oversees mining companies Fresnillo Plc and Industrias Penoles SAB, formed PetroBal to explore for crude in Mexico two weeks ago.

Read More… 


Drug Trafficking for Dummies A drug lord falls, and younger gangsters scramble to replace him

February 26, 2015

02/26/15 Bloomberg

Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán

Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán

U.S. and Mexican authorities hailed the capture of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman in the Pacific coast town of Mazatlan as a major victory in their war on drugs. A year later the power vacuum caused by his absence is fueling chaos on the streets of Chicago and Ciudad Juárez, across the border from El Paso. As head of the Sinaloa cartel, Mexico’s largest, Guzman was a ruthless enforcer of discipline. He employed violence to protect his distribution routes and intimidate rivals. The kingpin of kingpins, Guzman had the sway to settle disputes with other drug traffickers. In Chicago, his distribution center for the U.S., he cast a long shadow: Few dared cheat the Sinaloa cartel.

Read More…


Anti-corruption in Mexico: check the fine print

February 26, 2015

02/25/15 Financial Times 

Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

Good news: After weeks of political gridlock, Mexico’s three main parties have agreed a framework for a new anti-corruption system. It should be put to a vote in the lower house of Congress this week. But the devil is in the details. Does it go far enough? Will it get watered down before it comes to a vote? And, the biggest question of all, will it stop corruption? The jury is out. But before taking a look about what’s good and what should be better, it is worth remembering why Mexico so urgently needs a serious anti-corruption strategy. Corruption has long been an accepted part of life in Mexico. If you start digging, you will find it, says one political analyst – much like how the missing bodies of 43 students in the state of Guerrero has turned up other undiscovered mass graves.

Read More…


Acapulco hit by violence in teacher protest; one killed

February 26, 2015

02/25/15 Los Angeles Times 

guerreroA 65-year-old retired teacher was killed and dozens of people injured when police forcefully broke up a demonstration that blocked main roads in the tourist city of Acapulco, threatening a key component of Mexico’s economy, authorities said Wednesday. The demonstrators, including a radical teachers union and its supporters, had cut off access to the Acapulco airport Tuesday when police intervened. More than 100 protesters were arrested, and police gave tourists escorts to their flights.

Read More…


UPCOMING EVENT! Strengthening Regional Competitiveness: An Update on the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue

February 26, 2015

obama_nieto_featureWHEN: Wednesday, March 4, 9:30-11:00am

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP.

When Presidents Obama and Peña Nieto announced the creation of U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue (HLED) in May 2013, they established a new strategic vision for economic cooperation, focused on delivering tangible and positive economic benefits to the people of the United States and Mexico. Stakeholder engagement is a fundamental component of the HLED, as highlighted by its inclusion in the recently announced list of 2015 strategic goals. Other key areas of work for the year include energy; modern borders; workforce development, regulatory cooperation; and partnering for regional and global leadership. Speakers will discuss the accomplishments of the HLED and priorities in U.S.-Mexico economic cooperation for the coming year.

Speakers

Stefan Selig
Under Secretary for International Trade, U.S. Department of Commerce

Catherine Novelli
Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment, U.S. Department of State

José Raúl Perales
Assistant Secretary for the Private Sector, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Susan Kurland
Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs, U.S. Department of Transportation

Adam Sieminski
Administrator, U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy

Lori Faeth
Acting Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior

Kenneth Smith Ramos
Minister Counselor, Trade and NAFTA Office, Embassy of Mexico

For more information, or to RSVP, click here.

A live webcast will be available here.


Mexico president in crisis is losing support of big business

February 26, 2015

02/26/15 The Washington Post 

Bernardo Montoya/Reuters

Bernardo Montoya/Reuters

The full-page ad in Mexico’s national newspapers was unusual, if not unprecedented: 20 powerful business groups and think tanks publicly scolding the government for not doing its job. They demanded “conditions necessary to do their work … in total security, in all of the country.” The ad, published last month, called on President Enrique Pena Nieto to “honor your oath to observe and enforce the constitution.” The public criticism by Mexico’s business community underlines the eroding support for Pena Nieto’s administration as he enters the third year of a six-year term. Business leaders are angry over reforms that have increased the tax burden without sparking economic growth, scandals over apparent favoritism and acts of lawlessness that are hurting commerce.

Read More… 


Mexican Parties Say Deal Reached on Anti-Corruption Bill

February 25, 2015

Reuters UK, 2/25/2015

voting mexicoLeaders in Mexico’s lower house of Congress said on Tuesday they have reached agreement on an anti-corruption bill, delivering a boost to President Enrique Pena Nieto, who is trying to free himself from a damaging conflict of interest row.

The bill, which strengthens oversight of public officials and designates a special prosecutor to tackle corruption, follows months of stalled efforts to pass anti-graft measures and criticism of the government for neglecting the problem.

Read more…


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,324 other followers