Billionaire Carlos Slim’s America Movil To Boost Internet Speed In Mexico

5/22/2017 Forbes

america movilAmerica Movil (NYSE: AMX), the telecom giant controlled by Mexican tycoon Carlos Slim Helú, expects to roll out a 4.5G network in parts of Mexico by the end of 2017 and gear up for 5G by 2020, Daniel Hajj, the company’s CEO, said at a news conference in Mexico City on Thursday, according to Reuters and Mexican newspaper Reforma.

“We are going to move from a 4G network to a 4.5G network and then 5G… the 4.5G network will be 7 times faster than the current 4G,” Hajj announced.

Hajj explained that 5G capability will boost speeds to 10,000 megabits per second from the current 1,000 and will speed up the time it takes for the Internet to react to less than 5 milliseconds–a fifth of the current rate.

According to The Financial Times, Hajj sketched a future world of geo-localization bracelets that would be able to summon an ambulance immediately if the wearer became ill, and hospitals with access to clinical records held digitally in the cloud.

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Defying fears over Trump, Mexico first-quarter economic growth holds steady

5/22/2017 Reuters

4350685550_dbd28c7e50Increased farm output and services led Mexico’s economy to grow at the same clip in the first quarter as in the previous three-month period, shrugging off fears that Donald Trump’s presidency would quickly cause havoc to Mexican exports and investment.

The country’s gross domestic product grew at a rate of 0.7 percent, the same pace as in the fourth quarter, according to seasonally adjusted data from national statistics agency INEGI on Monday.

The election of Donald Trump last year raised the specter of recession in Mexico as he threatened to shred the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and pursue policies that could hurt the Mexican economy. This sent the country’s peso into a tailspin and prompted some economists to lower growth forecasts.

Nonetheless, slow progress in starting NAFTA talks and an overall softening of rhetoric about U.S. companies that invest in Mexico have calmed nerves for now.

Compared with the first quarter of 2016, GDP expanded 2.8 percent.

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Mexico, Colombia Meetings Show US Security Policy on Unsure Footing

5/19/2017 InSight Crime

Flag-Pins-Mexico-ColombiaA recent visit by top US officials to Mexico and a meeting between the presidents of Colombia and the United States in Washington, DC have provided further evidence that the US security strategy in Latin America under the new administration has yet to find its footing.

On May 18, US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly met with Mexican Foreign Relations Secretary Luis Videgaray Caso and Interior Secretary Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong to discuss future collaboration against organized crime and drug trafficking.

The officials recognized the need to tackle the drug trade on both sides of their shared border, and for the United States to focus more heavily on reducing drug consumption within the country.

The United States “must also confront the reality that we are the market,” Tillerson said.

“But for the seemingly endless demand by addicted users and the successful recruitment of young and vulnerable new users, there would be no market … We Americans must own this problem. It is ours,” he added.

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Mexican mob attacks Russian man in Cancun over insults

5/20/2017 Reuters

CancunA mob of angry Mexicans attacked a Russian man in the Caribbean resort of Cancun with sticks and rocks over his repeated insults against locals, and the 42-year-old man was accused of fatally stabbing a youth in the melee, authorities said on Saturday.

Police rescued the Russian, identified as Aleksei Makeev, after the crowd stormed his apartment on Friday night, said Guillermo Brahms, secretary general of Benito Juarez municipality, which encompasses Cancun.

Blurry footage of the attack circulated widely on Mexican media on Saturday. In one clip, assailants can be heard shouting “You’re going to die” and “I’m going to cut your head off” as they closed in on the Russian.

The incident began when a group of people confronted Makeev over his disparaging comments toward locals, many of which he videotaped and posted online.

Makeev stabbed a youth who got into his apartment, prompting the mob to grow and the violence to escalate, Brahms said.

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Complex World of Border Trade: Cattle Go North, Meat South

5/22/2017 New York Times

meat-packagingREYNOSA, Mexico — Waving arms and brandishing a long electric prod, the ranch hands and truck drivers herd about 400 leggy calves onto trucks as the sun crests on the outskirts of this border city. After spending their first eight months on the ranches of Gildardo Lopez Hinojosa, the calves are about to cross the border — bound for Texas and U.S. feed lots beyond.

On one of the three bridges connecting Reynosa with Texas, they might cross paths with the beef and chicken shipments that Lopez imports from the U.S. for his local chains of butcher shops and fried chicken restaurants. He gets the best price for his calves in the U.S. and it’s cheaper for him to import U.S. chicken than ship Mexican chicken from the country’s interior.

Lopez has been selling calves and buying beef across the border for about as long as the North American Free Trade Agreement has been in effect. President Donald Trump has said the agreement that is the basis for much of the $500 billion annual trade between the U.S. and Mexico needs to be renegotiated or scrapped entirely. To hear him tell it, NAFTA was “a catastrophic trade deal for the United States.”

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Charges Shed Light on Sea Cucumber Smuggling at US Border

5/20/2017 New York Times

san-ysidro-border-crossing-by-flickr-user-otzbergSAN DIEGO — Charges against a father-son partnership for allegedly smuggling more than $17 million worth of sea cucumbers to the United States and exporting them to Asia sheds light on a growing and lucrative illegal cross-border trade.

David Mayorquin and his father, Ramon Torres Mayorquin, are accused of a scheme to buy the illegally harvested animals from poachers in Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, pay for them under fake names and underestimate their weight and value to inspectors at San Diego’s Otay Mesa border crossing, across from Tijuana, Mexico. From San Diego, they allegedly shipped the product to Asia, including China, where they are delicacies in Chinese dishes, prized for medicinal value and considered an aphrodisiac.

Border inspectors have spotted smuggled Mexican sea cucumbers for years, but the charges against the Mayorquins and their family business, Blessings Inc. of Tucson, Arizona, are striking for the multi-ton shipments. Authorities say they sell for $300 to $500 a kilogram in Asia, helping explain the draw for poachers and smugglers.

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Rights Commission: Journalist Kidnapped in Southern Mexico

5/20/2017 New York Times

michoacanenglishMEXICO CITY — Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission is urging authorities to locate a journalist and media executive abducted in the southern state of Michoacan amid a wave of media slayings in recent weeks.

Salvador Adame is reportedly the owner and director of the local channel 6TV.

The rights commission says he was grabbed by armed men and forced into a vehicle Thursday night in the city of Nueva Italia, part of a violence-plagued region known as the “Tierra Caliente” or “Hot Lands.”

In a statement Friday, it also called on Michoacan officials to protect Adame’s family and his co-workers at 6TV.

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