Trump Warns Mexico on Migrant Caravan, Threatens to Close Border

10/18/2018 – The New York Times

5440384453_4669d0096b_bPresident Donald Trump threatened to deploy the military and close the southern U.S. border on Thursday if Mexico did not move to halt large groups of migrants headed for the United States from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

“I must, in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught – and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!” Trump wrote on Twitter.

Trump threatened to withhold aid to the region as a caravan with several thousand Honduran migrants traveled this week through Guatemala to Mexico in hopes of crossing into the United States to escape violence and poverty in Central America.

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U.S. Boosts Credit Line to Mexico in Gesture of Ties

10/17/2018 – Wall Street Journal

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Source: Edgard Garrido/Reuters

The U.S. is boosting the size of a credit line available to Mexico in times of need, part of a largely symbolic display of close ties as the countries prepare to sign a new version of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

U.S. Treasury Department officials said Wednesday they would triple the size of a credit facility known as the exchange stabilization agreement, potentially allowing Mexico to borrow up to $9 billion, compared with $3 billion under a previous agreement when the original Nafta came into force. Mexico also has a $3 billion line with the U.S. Federal Reserve that isn’t expected to change.

The size of the credit program, which comes in the form of a temporary swap line, is small compared with Mexico’s economy. Mexico already has a so-called flexible credit line of up to $87 billion with the International Monetary Fund that hasn’t been used. Mexico has previously drawn on the Treasury credit program in the aftermath of its economic crisis known as the Tequila Crisis in the 1990s. Treasury officials say there is no current indication that emergency funding is needed in Mexico, which has $173 billion in foreign-currency reserves.

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Borderline Navigating the invisible boundary and physical barriers that define the U.S.-Mexico border

10/17/2018 – The Washington Post

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Photo by izhar khan on Pexels.com

In 1989, the first fence built to stop illegal crossings from Mexico to the United States was erected in San Diego, where the border begins. From here, the border stretches for almost 2,000 miles, only 700 of which are walled or fenced. President Trump wants to change that.

San Diego

That first fence was a line of surplus helicopter landing pads, welded together. It stopped vehicles but not climbers, so a taller secondary layer came in 1996. Then came a third layer, including at Friendship Park, the one place where families not permitted to travel between the countries can gather to talk through mesh.

Nearly six miles east of Friendship Park is the port of entry at San Ysidro, which is the most heavily traveled in the Western Hemisphere; 135,000 people cross there each day.

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Record number of families crossing U.S. border as Trump threatens new crackdown

10/17/2018 – The Washington Post

chain linked fence
Photo by Min An on Pexels.com

The number of migrant parents entering the United States with children has surged to record levels in the three months since President Trump ended family separations at the border, dealing the administration a deepening crisis three weeks before the midterm elections.

Border Patrol agents arrested 16,658 family members in September, the highest one-month total on record and an 80 percent increase from July, according to unpublished Department of Homeland Security statistics obtained by The Washington Post.

Large groups of 100 or more Central American parents and children have been crossing the Rio Grande and the deserts of Arizona to turn themselves in, and after citing a fear of return, the families are typically assigned a court date and released from custody.

“We’re getting hammered daily,” said one Border Patrol agent in South Texas who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the news media.

The Latest: Mexico Says No Special Treatment for Caravan

10/17/2018 – The New York Times

3975895428_2e5d67614f_zMexico’s government says people in a caravan of Honduran migrants headed for the U.S. will be treated the same as anyone else entering the country: That means those with proper documents can enter and those who don’t either have to apply for refugee status or face deportation.

In a joint statement Wednesday, Mexico’s Foreign Relations and Interior Departments said that anyone in the caravan with travel documents and a proper visa will be allowed to enter, and anyone who wants to apply for refugee status can do so.

But the statement said all cases must be processed individually, suggesting that authorities have no intention of letting the migrants simply cross the border en masse without going through standard immigration procedures.

 

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Exclusive: Amazon zooms in on central Mexico for large new warehouse

10/17/2018 – Reuters 

blur-business-computer-230544Amazon.com Inc is scouting for land in central Mexico for a fourth distribution center in the country, sources said, aiming at a bigger slice of the burgeoning e-commerce market in Latin America’s second-largest economy.

The retail titan’s target is Queretaro state in the industrial center of Mexico, where it is looking to hire a developer to build a large hub, two real estate professionals familiar with Amazon’s property hunt said. They asked not to be named because Amazon has not announced its plans.

The expansion plan highlights Amazon’s intent to plant roots beyond Mexico’s bustling capital, banking on the nation’s potential to grow into an e-commerce engine of Latin America.

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Migrants Moving Again in Guatemala Despite Trump Threats

10/17/2018 – The New York Times

america-american-flag-blue-sky-1222438.jpgA caravan of some 2,000 Honduran migrants hit the road in Guatemala again Wednesday, hoping to reach the United States despite President Donald Trump’s threat to cut off aid to Central American countries that don’t stop them.

The weary migrants started walking again under a light rain. The day before they covered some 30 miles (50 kilometers) to arrive in Chiquimula, after crossing the border into Guatemala Monday.

Some hitched rides while others walked, as the eagerness of some to make quick progress clashed with the need to remain together as a group for safety.

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