Event This Thursday! Prayers for the Stolen, A Discussion of Violence against Women in Mexico

18007563WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination.

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Click here to RSVP.

Upcoming Book Event! Prayers for the Stolen, A Discussion of Violence against Women in Mexico

18007563WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP. 

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

“Beguiling, and even crazily enchanting…Prayers for the Stolen gives us words for what we haven’t had words for before, like something translated from a dream in a secret language.” – New York Times Book Review

A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination.

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Keynote Speaker
Jennifer Clement, Author

Moderator
Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Upcoming Event! Book Event: Prayers for the Stolen, A Discussion of Violence against Women in Mexico

WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP. 

“Beguiling, and even crazily enchanting…Prayers for the Stolen gives us words for what we haven’t had words for before, like something translated from a dream in a secret language.” – New York Times Book Review

A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination.

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Keynote Speaker
Jennifer Clement, Author, Prayers for the Stolen

Moderator
Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Infographic: Political Representation of Women in Mexico

Check out our new interactive infographic on female representation in Mexican politics!

Political_Representation_of_Women_in_Mexico (3)Click here to see the infographic.

Pregnant indigenous Mexican women face hospital discrimination

doctors by Flikr user Gov BaThe Los Angeles Times, 10/16/2013

Irma Lopez, a Mazatec Indian, waited to receive attention at a medical clinic in Oaxaca, but her labor pains became overwhelming. Spurned by the nurses, she retreated outdoors — and abruptly gave birth to a baby boy on the hospital lawn.

A few days later, it was revealed that two other pregnant indigenous women had also been turned away from Oaxaca hospitals, one of whom also delivered on the lawn, and that a fourth woman had been forced to have her baby on the reception floor at a hospital in Puebla.

Read more…

Will all-female traffic cops fix Mexico state corruption?

MSN News
MSN News

MSN News, 5/8/2013

Mexico’s most populous state is trying a new tactic to curtail extortion among its infamously corrupt municipal police forces — allowing only women to issue tickets for traffic violations. The governor of the state of Mexico, Eruviel Ávila, recently asked 12 of the 18 municipalities around Mexico City to stop issuing traffic tickets until the all-female force is installed.

The municipalities had not been complying with a 2012 law that says only officers on the special female transit teams can issue tickets in Mexico state, which has more than 15 million residents. The women officers, who wear black jackets with bright orange on the chest and shoulders to help drivers identify them easily, are already working in some parts of the state.

Read more…

266 Women are Accused for Abortion Each Year (Spanish)

hospital

Reforma, 4/9/2013

Criminalization of women who interrupted their pregnancy increased after state reforms that protect life from conception were passed.

Overall 679 Mexican women were denounced for  committing abortion between 2009 and 2011.

Read more…