Mexico’s Puebla state revokes Cabify permit after woman’s death

9/18/2017 Reuters

The central Mexican state of Puebla said on Monday it had revoked the operating license of ride-hailing firm Cabify after one of its drivers was arrested on suspicion of murdering a female passenger.

The body of Mara Fernanda Castilla, 19, was found near a motel in the city of Puebla on Friday, sparking weekend protests about violence against women in various parts of Mexico.

Diodoro Carrasco, Puebla’s interior minister, told a news conference the state had withdrawn the license of the Madrid-based Cabify due to “irregularities in its security protocols.”

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‘Impunity has consequences’: the women lost to Mexico’s drug war

12/8/2016 The Guardian 

drug_war_02Lizbeth Amores dropped off her son at her mother’s house before heading to a house party with her friend Verenice Guevara. They were last seen at a bar popular with local gangsters.

The following night, María de Jesús Marthen was among a dozen or so young women invited to a private party at a ranch about an hour east of the city centre. On her way to the event, Marthen messaged her boyfriend, pleading for help.

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Mexican Women are being Abducted in Broad Daylight from Guadalajara’s Streets

3/29/2016 Women in the World, The New York Times

A rash of abductions and attempted kidnappings carried out in broad daylight and targeting young women has baffled and worried many in Mexico’s second-largest city, Guadalajara, the capital city of Jalisco state, which last year saw 1,161 women reported missing during the course of the year. That was before the abductions really began to surge in March, according to Vice News.

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Violence against women soars in Mexico

11/25/14 Aljazeera 

women of juarezViolence against women must stop, United Nations chief Ban Ki-Moon said Tuesday — the International Day to End Violence Against Women — as it was reported that 14 of the 25 countries with the highest rates of femicide are located in Latin America. In Mexico, over a dozen female torture victims echoed Ban’s alarm. Members of the group “Break the Silence,” which aims at raise awareness of what it calls the government’s systematic use of sexual violence, said that despite countless cases, there have only been two federal convictions for torture of women in the country’s history, Mexican news website Animal Politico reported.

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Mexican Journalist Lydia Cacho Receives Prestigious French Award

journalismLatin American Herald Tribune, 3/13/2013

The French government named Mexican journalist and activist Lydia Cacho a Knight of the Legion of Honor for her work on behalf of children’s and women’s rights, and for her contribution to freedom of expression.

The honor was awarded Friday on the occasion of International Women’s Day by the French ambassador to Mexico, Elisabeth Beton Delegue, during a ceremony at the diplomat’s residence in the Mexican capital.

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Femicide cases increase in 9 states (Spanish)

femicidesEl Universal 2/14/2012

Las nueve entidades que registran una tendencia creciente de homicidios de mujeres son Chiapas, Chihuahua, Distrito Federal, Durango, Guerrero, Michoacán, Oaxaca, Sinaloa y Sonora, según un estudio presentado por la subsecretaria de Derechos Humanos de la Secretaría de Gobernación, Lía Limón, en el Senado de la República.

El estudio también analiza las particularidades de cada zona. En el noreste del país, por ejemplo, una mujer de 20 a 24 años tiene 39 veces más riesgo de morir por homicidio, que una mujer de la misma edad de la zona centro del país.

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Violence puts Mexico among worst G20 countries for women

Katherine Baldwin, Trust Law, 6/13/2012

Physical and sexual violence, a culture of male chauvinism, drug-related crime and poor access to healthcare in rural areas mean Mexico is among the worst places to be a woman out of the world’s most industrialised nations, a Thomson Reuters Foundation global survey of experts found on Wednesday.

The rash of unresolved murders of women in border towns like Ciudad Juarez and sexual attacks on migrant women contributed to Mexico’s poor ranking, despite the country’s economic progress and international prominence, experts said.

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