US extends travel restrictions at Mexican and Canadian land borders as it makes plans to allow fully vaccinated foreign visitors to fly to America

09/21/2021

Source: CNN

The United States is extending nonessential travel restrictions at land crossings with Canada and Mexico through October 21, even as it makes plans to allow fully vaccinated foreign visitors to come to the US later this year.

“We do not have any updates to the land border policies at this point. Title 19 is being extend for another month, as it is done on a monthly bases, through October 21, and as I said, no further updates on that policy at this point,” White House Covid-19 response coordinator Jeff Zients announced Monday.

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FAA Lowers Mexico’s Air-Safety Rating

Date: 05/25/2021

Source: The Wall Street Journal

U.S. officials downgraded Mexico’s air-safety oversight, a setback to the country’s airline industry as travel has started to pick up from the depths of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday that it had demoted Mexico to a Category 2 air-safety ranking and would increase scrutiny of Mexican airline flights into the U.S.

The FAA said its Mexican counterpart, the Agencia Federal de Aviación Civil, fell short of international standards. The FAA said it would help Mexican aviation authorities improve their safety oversight.

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U.S. Eyes Surcharge For Inbound Canada, Mexico Travelers

The Wall Street Journal, 7/8/11

Canadian exporters warned Friday of a possible deterioration in North American trade relations due to a push in Congress to slap U.S.-bound Canadian and Mexican travelers with a surcharge.

The surcharge, estimated at $5.50 per passenger and proposed by the House Ways and Means Committee, is designed to offset lost revenue resulting from a free-trade pact with Colombia.

Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters said the surcharge would be levied starting next year against Canadians and Mexicans who arrive at a U.S. airport or port.

The travel surcharge was included as part of the U.S.-Colombia free-trade legislation to make up for anticipated lost revenue once duties on Colombian-made imports are removed. The fee would raise about $553 million by 2016, as estimated by the Congressional Budget Office in its review of the deal.

Canada and Mexico are trading partners with the U.S. as part of the North American Free Trade Agreement, while the U.S. and Canada are each other’s largest trading partner with about $500 billion in goods crossing the borders each year.

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