Andres Oppenheimer: Obama’s TPP may reshape world trade

2/6/2016 Miami Herald

The formal signing last week of the world’s biggest trade and investment agreement — the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP — went almost unnoticed in most countries, but it could soon start to change the world’s economic and political maps.

One of the reasons why the 12-country trade agreement’s Thursday signing ceremony in New Zealand drew little world attention was that neither President Barack Obama nor other leaders of participating countries attended the event, and chose to send their trade ministers instead…

…“The TPP does not aim to create divisions within Latin America, although it will accentuate the contrast between TPP member countries’ pursuit of export-oriented growth strategies, and the more closed economic models of countries such as Brazil and Venezuela,” says Christopher Wilson, of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars’ Mexico Institute.

What does agreement on the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) mean?

10/7/2015 Wilson Center

By Diana Villiers Negroponte, Mexico Institute Advisory Board Member

On October 4, the 12 trading partners in the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) reached agreement after tough negotiations lasting 7 years. [1] The final hurdles on intellectual property protection for pharmaceuticals, market access for dairy products and rules of origin for automobiles were resolved at the recent meeting in Atlanta.  (In 2008, President Bush joined the trade negotiations which had started with 3 nations in 2002). The sense of relief is notable, but TTP must still be approved by the U.S. Congress. All 12 countries need U.S. leadership on this major trade agreement and all made concessions to keep the U.S. in the game.  For the United States to reject TPP because of pressure from the tobacco, pharmaceutical or any other specific industrial group would indicate American reluctance to play a leadership role in the world.  The 11 other parties to TPP are watching the U.S. Congress closely. Will it accept this agreement impacting countries that account for 40% of global GDP and 26% of world trade, or will it withdraw into domestic partisan fights and ignore the global impact?

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TPP and Canada: Wishful Thinking on Supply Management?

08/26/14 By David N. Biette, Director, Canada Institute, Wilson Center. Americas Trade Policy

Photo by Flickr user I.A.M.
Photo by Flickr user I.A.M.

One of the many goals of multilateral trade agreements is to level the field so that companies, industries, and countries compete on the basis of market forces. This requires all participants to be willing to open their markets in protected sectors in exchange for better access to the markets of their trade partners. In order to get the benefits sought, each party to the negotiation has to give up something.

As Canada wraps up its Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the EU, it remains deeply involved in another very ambitious multilateral negotiation: the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP). Canada became an observer to the TPP negotiations in 2010, but did not become a full member until 2012 because New Zealand, one of the founders of the TPP negotiations, and the United States held up Canada’s request due to concerns about Canada’s supply management of dairy, poultry, and eggs, as well as the longstanding U.S. complaint about Canada’s lack of protection for intellectual property rights.

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Op Ed: Mexico Suffered, and the United States Felt Its Pain

The New York Times, 11/24/2013

By Laura Carlsen

NAFTANafta is limping toward its 20th anniversary with a beat-up image and a bad track record. Recent polls show that the majority of the U.S. people favors “leaving” or “renegotiating” the model trade agreement.

While much has been said about its impact on U.S. job loss and eroding labor conditions, some of the most severe impacts of Nafta have been felt south of the border.

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Mexico backs Japan’s bid to join Trans-Pacific trade talks

Enrique PeñaNieto 2Reuters, 4/8/13

Mexico on Monday gave its support to Japan’s bid to join trade talks in the Asia-Pacific region that would create the world’s largest free trade zone. Japan asked to join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) in March and is awaiting a formal decision by the 11 current participating countries, which could come as early as this month.

“We express our sympathy, support and backing for the interest that Japan has shown in participating in the TPP,” Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto said at a joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo. If Japan, the world’s third-largest economy, joins the TPP, the free trade zone would cover nearly 40 percent of world economic output.

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Time to review trade relations with Mexico

mexico-usa-flag-montageSan Francisco Chronicle, 3/12/2013

Since Enrique Pena Nieto’s election, the Mexican president has focused on economic growth and fighting poverty. The new Mexican administration should focus on out-competing China and other lower-cost manufacturers. The higher price of fuel has meant that goods from Asia are more expensive to ship, providing a further incentive for North American companies to source products from Mexico.

As we begin the 20th year of the North American Free Trade Agreement among Canada, the United States and Mexico, it is a good time to reflect on the seminal trade pact and how to encourage integration and foster economic growth.

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Mexico formally entered the TPP

Secretary of the Economy, 10/8/12

Bruno Ferrari

Mexico formally joined the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) as a full negotiating member once the other countries finished their internal procedures to accept new members. This important achievement in Mexico’s trade policy has been the result of an intense effort, which began in November 2011, when Mexico expressed interest in being part of this negotiation.