U.S.-Mexico border reopens after 20 months of COVID shutdown

Source: Reuters

TIJUANA/CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico, Nov 8 (Reuters) – There were fewer crossings at the Mexico-United States border than expected on Monday as it reopened to nonessential travel following a 20-month closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with many residents staying home to avoid potential chaos.

Reporting by Lizbeth Diaz in Tijuana and Jose Luis Gonzalez in Ciudad Juarez Additional reporting by Cassandra Garrison in Mexico City Editing by Jonathan Oatis and Matthew Lewis.

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Spurred by reopening, more migrants head for U.S.-Mexico border

11/08/2021

Source: Reuters

Emboldened by news that the United States and Mexico will reopen shared land-border crossings, hundreds of migrants have arrived at Mexican border cities like Tijuana, hoping the reset will make it easier to cross and seek U.S. asylum.

Starting on Monday, the nearly 2,000-mile (3,200-km) border will be open again to non-essential travel after a 20-month closure aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19. Both countries have succeeded in lowering new infections and vaccinating border communities.

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‘We made it’: Haitians learn from experience to reach Mexico’s Tijuana

Source: Reuters

While thousands of Haitians were detained, deported or expelled from a camp on Mexico’s frontier with Texas last week, many others traveled west to the border city of Tijuana, hoping to avoid a crackdown aimed at stemming the rising tide of migrants.

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Mexican Workers on Border Get Vaccines to Aid Them, and the U.S. Economy

07/27/2021

Source: The New York Times

They labor in factories in Mexico producing goods U.S. consumers enjoy. But where American communities are awash in unused coronavirus vaccines, Mexican workers are often hard-pressed to find a single shot.

On one recent morning, however, hundreds of workers from the factories known as maquiladoras were waved across the border into San Diego, without visas or passports, and rolled up their sleeves to be vaccinated. An hour later, they were back on production lines in Tijuana.

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Tijuana, Ciudad Juárez, León top list of 50 most violent municipalities so far this year

07/20/2021

Source: Mexico News Daily

Tijuana was the most violent municipality in Mexico in the first five months of 2021 in terms of sheer homicide numbers, federal data shows.

Navy Minister Rafael Ojeda presented a graph at President López Obrador’s news conference on Monday that showed the 50 most violent municipalities between January and May this year.

Tijuana, Baja California, ranked first with 749 homicides for an average of 150 per month or five per day. Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, was second with 515 homicides between January and May followed by León, Guanajuato, 295; Cajeme (Ciudad Obregón), Sonora, 225; and Acapulco, Guerrero, 197.

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‘I’m trapped here’: Haitian asylum seekers languish in Mexico

04/24/2021

Source: Aljazeera

Tijuana, Mexico – Each morning, Samuel* leaves the cramped, single-room apartment he shares with a dozen other Haitian asylum seekers in central Tijuana and wanders over to the makeshift migrant camp that he used to call home.

Until last month, he had lived peacefully at El Chaparral, a sprawling migrant tent city near the US-Mexico border wall, alongside Haitians and asylum seekers from other countries, all waiting to try to get into the United States.

But Samuel says the atmosphere gradually shifted to one of hostility.

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Mexican president to visit border city, discuss security

02/17/2021

Source: WAVY

TIJUANA (Border Report) — Mexico President Andrés Manuel López Obrador will visit Tijuana on Saturday to discuss security in this corner of Mexico where more than 2,000 murders were recorded last year.

López Obrador, referred to by many in Mexico as AMLO, will also cut the ribbon and inaugurate a National Guard armory in Tijuana.

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In Mexico, thousands more names added to border wait lists

8/9/19 – Associated Press

By Elliot Spagat

Border fence

The Cameroonian men who share 10 mattresses on the floor of a third-floor apartment above a barber shop walk every morning to the busiest U.S. border crossing with Mexico, hoping against all odds that it will be their lucky day to claim asylum in the United States. Their unlikely bet is that a sympathetic Mexican official will somehow find a spot for them.

“I go because if they open up, I’m in,” said Rashidou Hdzekasaah, 35, who has been idled in Tijuana for two months and still has more than 6,000 names ahead of him on a waiting list to claim asylum at the San Diego crossing.

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Tijuana protesters chant ‘Out!’ at migrants camped in city

11/19/2018 – Washington Post

tijuana.PNG
(Rodrigo Abd/Associated Press)

TIJUANA, Mexico — Hundreds of Tijuana residents congregated around a monument in an affluent section of the city south of California on Sunday to protest the thousands of Central American migrants who have arrived via caravan in hopes of a new life in the U.S.

Tensions have built as nearly 3,000 migrants from the caravan poured into Tijuana in recent days after more than a month on the road, and with many more months ahead of them while they seek asylum. The federal government estimates the number of migrants could soon swell to 10,000.

U.S. border inspectors are processing only about 100 asylum claims a day at Tijuana’s main crossing to San Diego. Asylum seekers register their names in a tattered notebook managed by migrants themselves that had more than 3,000 names even before the caravan arrived.

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Migrants Streaming Into Tijuana, but Now Face Long Stay

11/16/2018 – New York Times

migr
Source: CNN

TIJUANA, Mexico — About 2,000 Central American migrants had already reached the Mexican border city of Tijuana and another 1,200 from a second caravan set out from Mexico City toward the border Friday.

With shelters already full, authorities in Tijuana opened a gymnasium and gated sport complex for up to 1,000 migrants, with a potential to expand to 3,000.

But at least that many migrants were still on the road or trickling into the city aboard buses, and a third caravan was still waiting in Mexico City. Tijuana faced a potential influx of as many as 10,000 in all. The city’s privately run shelters are meant to have a capacity of 700.

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