Only 3% of domestic workers enjoy social security benefits

Date: February 3, 2022

Source: Mexico News Daily

The Supreme Court ruled in 2018 that domestic workers must must have access to social security benefits like any other worker, but only 3% actually do, according to the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women).

Belén Sanz Luque, Mexico representative of UN Women, said that 97% of Mexico’s 2.2 million domestic workers – most of whom are women – are employed informally and don’t receive benefits such as health care and paid vacations.

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Mexican Congress approves budget after protests

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11/22/19 – AP News

Mexico’s lower house of Congress approved the 2020 federal budget Friday in an all-night meeting at a convention center after protests and blockades by farm groups surrounding the Congress building.

The protests were sparked by President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador’s policy of giving money directly to farmers and poor families rather than distributing funds through groups that claim to represent them.

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Mexican president defends indigenous pensions plan

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11/18/19 – AP News

Mexico’s president on Monday defended a plan to provide pensions to indigenous people starting at age 65, compared with 68 for other Mexicans.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who was elected last year after campaigning to help marginalized people, said those who question the idea should visit poor indigenous communities to see how residents live.

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Mexico Names New Heads of Pemex, Health, Social Security

2/8/2016 ABC News

120px-PemexA U.S.-educated economist took up the reins of state oil company Petroleos Mexicanos in one of several Cabinet changes announced Monday by President Enrique Pena Nieto.

Jose Antonio Gonzalez Anaya was sworn in as head of the oil company better known as Pemex, which has been hit hard by the plunge in global crude prices as Mexico embarks on an ambitious overhaul of its energy sector.

He replaced Emilio Lozoya, who had been at the post since 2012. Lozoya’s tenure was marked by an explosion at Pemex headquarters that killed 37 people in January 2013, shortly after he took office, and rising fuel thefts from Pemex pipelines.

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Mexico aims to lure millions out of informal economy

Old Man selling bananas - CubaThe Global Post, 11/12/2013

Alfredo Barrueta has worked in the streets of Mexico City since childhood, graduating from ball juggler to car windshield cleaner before scratching a living by selling roses.

Barrueta, 37, is among 30 million Mexicans, or 60 percent of workers, toiling in the informal economy — a massive workforce that the government is trying to convince to pay taxes in return for wider social security.

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Mexico aims to bring shadow economy into the light

Old Man selling bananas - CubaReuters, 6/26/2013

Seeking to dismantle a black economy dragging on economic growth, Mexico wants to lure informal workers into the social security net – and the reach of the tax man. Six in 10 Mexican workers, or 30 million people, live in the informal economy, eroding Mexico’s already-low tax base and hindering plans to set up a universal social security system.

“The country loses 3 or 4 percentage points of GDP every year because 60 percent of its workers don’t generate any taxes and also don’t have social security benefits,” Labor Minister Alfonso Navarrete said on Tuesday. “If there are no real incentives to make it attractive for informal workers to turn formal … it’s difficult to get this group to migrate.” Navarrete said the new program would get government and employers working with Mexico’s powerful labor unions to bring workers into the formal fold and give them access to mortgage and lending programs set up for workers.

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A $4.6 Trillion Opportunity: Immigration reform will improve Social Security’s finances

social_security_number_250x251The Wall Street Journal, 6/2/2013

The Senate immigration bill has ignited a debate over the fiscal costs of reform, with some conservatives claiming costs far exceed the benefits. We think that’s wrong, and one place to look for evidence is the costliest of all federal programs, Social Security. As some 75 million baby boomers prepare to retire, immigrants will be crucial to keeping the federal pension program afloat.

As too few Americans understand, Social Security is not a pre-funded retirement system and there is no “lock box” with money set aside for each worker’s retirement. It operates as a pay-as-you-go system. Benefits paid out each year roughly match payroll tax revenues collected, at least until the program goes into annual deficit in a few more years, and the so-called trust fund only contains IOUs that the government owes itself. Those IOUs don’t help. The Social Security Administration estimates that the present discounted value of the 75-year shortfall of promised benefits beyond the taxes expected to be collected is $8.6 trillion.

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Study: Immigration reform would create over three million jobs

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants 2 participate in march for Immigrants and Mexicans protesting against Illegal Immigration reform by U.S. Congress, Los Angeles, CA, May 1, 2006The Washington Post, 5/8/2013

With the debate raging over whether immigration reform would gouge taxpayers, Senator Marco Rubio’s office has asked the Social Security Actuary to produce an analysis of the legislation. The findings will provide immigration reform advocates with a major boost.

The most important finding, for the purposes of the debate, is that the Gang of Eight immigration reform proposal would create 3.22 million jobs by 2024, and boost GDP by 1.63 percent. “We estimate a significant increase in both the population and the number of workers paying taxes in the United States as a result of these changes in legal immigration limits,” the analysis says.

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Social Security Institutions Must Register Gay Partners: National Council to Prevent Discrimination (in Spanish)

CNN México, 7/12/11

El Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) y el Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE) cometieron actos de discriminación al negarse a registrar a los cónyuges de derechohabientes casados con personas del mismo sexo, resolvió este lunes el Consejo Nacional para Prevenir la Discriminación (Conapred).

La Resolución por Disposición al IMSS e ISSSTE por Discrmininación a Matrimonios entre Personas del Mismo Sexo, que le fue enviada la semana pasada a las dos dependencias, establece que “ambas instituciones deben garantizar el ejercicio pleno y en igualdad de trato y de oportunidades a quienes son derechohabientes, y a sus cónyuges o concubinas, sin ningún tipo de discriminación motivada por sus preferencias sexuales“.

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