EVENT TOMORROW! Criminal Justice in an Emerging Democracy: Perspectives from Mexico’s Inmates

March 26, 2015

prison cell blockWHEN: TOMORROW, Friday, May 27, 9:00-10:30am

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico’s lower courts are undergoing a dramatic transformation, abandoning its behind-closed-doors, written criminal trials, and embracing a new criminal justice system (NCJS) with oral, adversary procedures. This reform template has been adopted by at least fourteen nations in Latin America. In order to measure the effects these reforms have on the criminal justice system, this event will present two studies that examine the system from an inmate’s perspective.

Roberto Hernández, the creator of the movies Presunto Culpable and El Tunel, will present a study that quantifies how authorities use their investigative powers to conduct eyewitness identification procedures; and interview or interrogate suspects. Elena Azaola will discuss a study conducted in 2014 in youth detention centers for adolescents who committed serious crimes. The study analyzes the background of these adolescents and the factors that contributed to their criminal actions.

Speakers

Roberto Hernández 
Mexican Lawyer and Filmmaker

Elena Azaola
Psychoanalyst and Anthropologist

Moderator

John Bailey
Professor, Georgetown University

Click here for more information, or to RSVP.


UPCOMING EVENT! Criminal Justice in an Emerging Democracy: Perspectives from Mexico’s Inmates

March 23, 2015

hands in handcuffsWHEN: Friday, March 27, 9:00-10:30am

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico’s lower courts are undergoing a dramatic transformation, abandoning its behind-closed-doors, written criminal trials, and embracing a new criminal justice system (NCJS) with oral, adversary procedures. This reform template has been adopted by at least fourteen nations in Latin America. In order to measure the effects these reforms have on the criminal justice system, this event will present two studies that examine the system from an inmate’s perspective.

Roberto Hernández, the creator of the movies Presunto Culpable and El Tunel, will present a study that quantifies how authorities use their investigative powers to conduct eyewitness identification procedures; and interview or interrogate suspects. Elena Azaola will discuss a study conducted in 2014 in youth detention centers for adolescents who committed serious crimes. The study analyzes the background of these adolescents and the factors that contributed to their criminal actions.

Speakers

Roberto Hernández 
Mexican Lawyer and Filmmaker

Elena Azaola
Psychoanalyst and Anthropologist

Moderator

John Bailey
Professor, Georgetown University

Click here for more information.


UPCOMING EVENT! U.S.-Mexico Relations, Security and Human Rights

March 10, 2015

mexico-usa-flag-montageWHEN: Tuesday, March 17, 4:30-6:00pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico has experienced an intense security crisis, organized crime wave and an explosion in violent crime. In the past, scholars, analysts, and media commentators have overlooked the central role of U.S. policy towards Mexico, instead framing the discussion in terms of a battle over territory and political control between drug trafficking organizations and the state.

While drawing on contemporary debates, this event will go beyond these often limited discussions about the causes and factors which have culminated in Mexico’s most violent period since the Revolution. In particular, it will consider the role of U.S. policy, including the extent to which Mexico’s struggle against organized crime and bilateral policy have affected the security situation, and will explore potential solutions to the crisis in an attempt to foster a new debate about the role of the United States in Mexico.

Chair:
Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Speaker:
Mónica Serrano, Professor, International Relations, El Colegio de México

Discussants:
Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Benjamin T. Smith, Associate Professor, Latin American History, University of Warwick

Mariclaire Acosta, Director, Freedom House, Mexico

For more information, click here.


Group of Technical Experts Arrive in Mexico to Investigate Case of Disappeared Students

March 6, 2015

3/6/2015 Washington Office on Latin America

By Maureen Meyer and Hannah Smith

The Associated Press October 22, 2014

The Associated Press October 22, 2014

After the enforced disappearance of 43 students in Iguala, Guerrero in September 2014, the Mexican government and the legal representatives for the students and their families requested technical assistance from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR). In November 2014, the three parties signed an agreement that led to the formation of the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (Grupo Interdisciplinario de Expertos y Expertas Independientes). This Group of Experts is tasked with reviewing and investigating the case of the disappeared students from the teachers’ college in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, but its work could have broader implications for changing how Mexico handles other cases of disappearances, which have skyrocketed in recent years. On March 1, 2015, the Group of Experts traveled to Mexico to begin its work.

Read more…


Mexico: The Unbearable Cost of Distrust

March 5, 2015

By Arturo Franco, The Expert Take

justice - gavelTrust is at the heart of Mexico’s challenges today. The lubricant of the economic engine, trust enables market exchanges, reduces transaction costs for business, upholds security and peace, and makes institutions and the political system work. Distrust, in turn, creates unnecessary costs, incentivizes negative behaviors, and can become a huge burden for productivity and for growth.

Mexicans’ reported levels of trust and confidence in a wide range of institutions have been declining for many years. Between 2013 and 2014, virtually every institution, from the police to the church, from television stations and universities, to political parties, Congress and the president, have suffered from rising public distrust. What is worse, perhaps, is that investor confidence has also eroded.

Read the entire Expert Take here…


Postcard Campaign Highlights Mexico’s Flaws

March 4, 2015

3/4/2015 Financial Times

mexican-flag1How should Mexico combat the “incredulity and distrust” that President Enrique Peña Nieto himself admits has swept the country? Answers on a postcard, please.

More than 8,000 people have done just that. In a campaign launched by civil society groups in November, Mexicans have vented their frustration with the ruling classes by sending in their own proposals for reforming the country. They will make uncomfortable reading for the government.

Read more…


UPCOMING EVENT: The Future of the Mexican Left

February 13, 2015

armando-rios-piterWHEN: Monday, February 23, 9:00-10:30am

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC

Mexican political parties across the spectrum face challenges due to recent security breakdowns, issues of corruption, and a decline in public faith in governance. Though not alone in the process, left-wing parties in Mexico, including the PRD, Partido del Trabajo, and Morena, are going through an important period of change, presenting an opportunity for us to reflect on the future of the Mexican left. Will these pressures bring the left together and move it forward, or will they lead to divisions and fragmentation?

Senator Armando Ríos Piter represents the Mexican State of Guerrero. In the Senate, he is secretary of several committees, including Finance and Public Credit; Government; Trade and Industry; and the Special Commission to evaluate Public Finances. He is a member of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, and previously served as a member of the Mexican Chamber of Deputies from 2009 to 2012. During this challenging time in Mexico, Senator Ríos Piter will share with us his vision of the future of the Mexican left and the challenges the country faces.

To RSVP for the event, click here.

A live webcast will be available.


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