PHONE EVENT: The Escape of El Chapo Guzmán and the Struggle Against Organized Crime

July 20, 2015

Exclusive Dial-In Event:

ElChapoWHEN: Wednesday, July 22 at 9:30am

DIAL-IN INFO: 

Toll Free #: 888-947-9018
Conference #: 1-517-308-9006
Conference Passcode: 13304

Click here to RSVP.

On Saturday, July 11, around 9 p.m., drug kingpin Joaquín Guzmán Loera, better known as “El Chapo” Guzmán, escaped, for the second time, from a maximum security prison in Mexico.

The Mexico Institute is delighted to present a dial-in event in which expert analysts will offer their take on the broader implications of this escape on the future of Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico security relationship. The event will address four specific questions:

1. How damaging is the escape for the credibility of the Mexican government’s struggle against organized crime?

2. What steps is the government taking to try to recapture El Chapo, and what elements are missing from that effort?

3. How does El Chapo’s escape impact on the panorama of organized crime in Mexico? Will we see a resurgent Sinaloa Cartel now that its leader is free?

4. What impact will the escape have on bilateral relations with the U.S., on trust levels between security agencies, and the ongoing debate over extradition?

Join us BY PHONE for a discussion of this current event, the response by both governments, and the meaning of El Chapo’s escape for Mexico’s international image, with Mexico security experts Duncan Wood, Alejandro Hope, Steven Dudley, and Eric L. Olson.

Speakers

Alejandro Hope
Director de Política de Seguridad, IMCO

Steven Dudley
Co-Director, InSight Crime

Eric L. Olson
Associate Director, Latin American Program, Wilson Center

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.


Mexico deploys thousands to hunt down Joaquin Guzman

July 17, 2015

07/17/15 BBC

Photo by Flickr user Thraxil

Photo by Flickr user Thraxil

Mexico says it has stepped up its search for drug lord Joaquin Guzman, who escaped from jail on Saturday. The Interior Ministry said it had deployed almost 10,000 police and 48 dogs to track down the fugitive leader of the Sinaloa cartel. Mexico is also co-operating with neighboring Guatemala and the United States to increase border controls. Guzman’s escape from a top-security jail through a 1.5km-long tunnel is a major embarrassment for officials. It is the second time the drug cartel leader has escaped from a top-security Mexican jail.

Read more…


Why Mining Companies Struggle with Security in Mexico

July 7, 2015

7/3/15 Stratfor Global Intelligence 

MiningGuerrero state has a significant number of productive mines, many of which exploit the rich seam of gold that runs through the region. Unfortunately, as interim Guerrero state Gov. Rogelio Ortega emphasized June 26, the preponderance of mineral extraction companies provides numerous targets for rampant criminal activity, much of which goes unrecorded. The governor urged mining companies to report all crimes perpetrated against them and to invest in public security instead of making extortion payments, often as high as $100,000 per month.

Ortega’s statement highlights a common problem: large multinational firms operating in Mexico are hesitant to report security issues to authorities, particularly in regard to kidnapping and extortion. It also serves as a reminder of the weak rule of law throughout most of Guerrero state that continues to challenge multinational corporations operating there.

Read more…


Law Will Let Some Foreign Agents Carry Weapons in Mexico

April 24, 2015

Reuters, 4/23/2015

youth with handgunMexico’s congress approved on Thursday a reform that lets some foreign agents carry arms inside the country, a significant change in a nation that has historically said the practice would violate its sovereignty.

Under the law, foreign customs and migration agents will be allowed to carry guns in previously established zones. Also, foreign leaders or heads of state will be able to enter Mexico with armed security details.

Officials say the presence of foreign agents in Mexico will speed up the joint inspection process and facilitate the flow of goods and people across borders. They also say foreign customs and migration agents at times need guns to guarantee their security given the problems of drug and human trafficking.

Read more…


Bloody Attack on Police in Mexico Raises Jalisco Cartel’s Profile

April 10, 2015

4/8/2015 InSight Crime

machine gunMexico’s Jalisco Cartel has reportedly killed 15 police officers in the Pacific state of Jalisco, a brazen act of violence that will most likely draw the wrath of security forces and may stem the criminal organization’s rapid expansion.

On April 7, Mexican authorities confirmed that the Jalisco Cartel – New Generation (CJNG, for its Spanish initials) ambushed a police convoy and killed 15 police officers in the state of Jalisco, reported the BBC. Five additional police agents were reportedly injured in the attack, which took place on April 6.

Read more…


Infographic: “Were You Mistreated?”

April 6, 2015

By Gabrielle Velasco, Mexico Institute intern

__Were_You________MistreatedThis new infographic by the Mexico Institute charts data gathered from a survey conducted by Roberto Hernandez that asks Mexican prison inmates in the State of Mexico and DF if they were mistreated during their interrogations.

Click here to see the infographic. 

Related material:

Video: Criminal Just in an Emerging Democracy: Perspectives from Mexico’s Inmates

Transparency and the Rule of Law Series

Inmate Experiences in Mexican Prisons

Mexico’s Prison Reform

Youth Incarceration in Mexico


EVENT TOMORROW! Criminal Justice in an Emerging Democracy: Perspectives from Mexico’s Inmates

March 26, 2015

prison cell blockWHEN: TOMORROW, Friday, May 27, 9:00-10:30am

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico’s lower courts are undergoing a dramatic transformation, abandoning its behind-closed-doors, written criminal trials, and embracing a new criminal justice system (NCJS) with oral, adversary procedures. This reform template has been adopted by at least fourteen nations in Latin America. In order to measure the effects these reforms have on the criminal justice system, this event will present two studies that examine the system from an inmate’s perspective.

Roberto Hernández, the creator of the movies Presunto Culpable and El Tunel, will present a study that quantifies how authorities use their investigative powers to conduct eyewitness identification procedures; and interview or interrogate suspects. Elena Azaola will discuss a study conducted in 2014 in youth detention centers for adolescents who committed serious crimes. The study analyzes the background of these adolescents and the factors that contributed to their criminal actions.

Speakers

Roberto Hernández 
Mexican Lawyer and Filmmaker

Elena Azaola
Psychoanalyst and Anthropologist

Moderator

John Bailey
Professor, Georgetown University

Click here for more information, or to RSVP.


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