UPCOMING EVENT: The Future of the Mexican Left

February 13, 2015

armando-rios-piterWHEN: Monday, February 23, 9:00-10:30am

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC

Mexican political parties across the spectrum face challenges due to recent security breakdowns, issues of corruption, and a decline in public faith in governance. Though not alone in the process, left-wing parties in Mexico, including the PRD, Partido del Trabajo, and Morena, are going through an important period of change, presenting an opportunity for us to reflect on the future of the Mexican left. Will these pressures bring the left together and move it forward, or will they lead to divisions and fragmentation?

Senator Armando Ríos Piter represents the Mexican State of Guerrero. In the Senate, he is secretary of several committees, including Finance and Public Credit; Government; Trade and Industry; and the Special Commission to evaluate Public Finances. He is a member of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, and previously served as a member of the Mexican Chamber of Deputies from 2009 to 2012. During this challenging time in Mexico, Senator Ríos Piter will share with us his vision of the future of the Mexican left and the challenges the country faces.

To RSVP for the event, click here.

A live webcast will be available.


Policing in Mexico

February 11, 2015

By Pedro Valenzuela, Mexico Institute intern

Police in Mexico.001In this info-graphic, the Mexico Institute compares state and municipal police numbers across the country. It also describes some of  the challenges that the police force in Mexico currently faces both at municipal and federal levels.

Click here to view or download the full image.


The Mexican State and Anti-Corruption Efforts

February 9, 2015

By Pedro Valenzuela

Mexican State and Transparency.001The Mexico Institute charts how the Mexican State is fighting corruption. This infographic analyses Mexico’s institutions and the current debate in Congress. It also illustrates some of our recommendations:
1) Disseminate good practices to local governments.
2) Connect irregular findings to punishments.
3) Investigate corruption.
4) Improve coordination with local instances.
Click here to view the infographic. 

Una utopía mexicana

February 9, 2015

2/9/2015 La Silla Rota

By Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President of the Wilson Center and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute

A Mexican UtopiaEn un nuevo libro publicado por el Centro Wilson, Luis Rubio argumenta que México necesita de un estadista que está dispuesto a ceder poderes informales en aras de hacer funcionar el gobierno como debe de ser.  En el libro Una Utopía Mexicana: El Estado de Derecho es Posible  argumenta que el presidente mexicano en turno goza de amplios poderes informales sobre los gobernadores, legisladores y el sistema judicial, pero que carece de un Estado que funcione bien o que tenga instituciones capaces de llevar a cabo sus funciones y sus proyectos.

Frente a esta contradicción, un presidente poderoso con un Estado deficiente, Rubio propone un trueque interesante: Que el presidente que de veras quiere gobernar bien y con efectividad se dedique a construir un Estado de derecho que limita sus poderes informales, pero amplía las funciones formales del Estado. Sería un cambio de discreción por funcionalidad, de margen de maniobra por capacidad de gobernar.

Read more…

Download the book here.


NEW PUBLICATION: Violence and Insecurity in Guerrero

February 5, 2015

By Chris Kyle

Resilient Communities Series15This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Insecurity and violence associated with organized criminal activity are pervasive in Mexico’s southern state of Guerrero.  The state’s homicide rate is the highest in the country and extortion and kidnapping are commonplace.  For perpetrators, there is near complete impunity.  The state is divided into territories within which either drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) or community policing networks exercise control over local policing functions.  Local, state, or federal authorities occasionally join this competition, but for the most part policing powers are held by others.  In rural areas competition between groups of traffickers over the state’s prodigious narcotics output has created violent no-man’s-lands in buffer zones between territories controlled by rival groups.  In cities violence is mostly a byproduct of efforts to establish and preserve monopolies in extortion, kidnapping, and retail contraband markets.  Despite claims to the contrary by state and federal authorities, there has been no discernible improvement in public security in recent months or years.

Restraining the violence in Guerrero will require that state authorities make a systematic effort to address two existing realities that sustain the criminal activities producing violence.  Thus, this paper examines the security situation in the state of Guerrero, including the operation of drug trafficking organizations, and proposes possible solutions to the security crisis.

Read the paper here.


NEW PUBLICATION! A Mexican Utopia: The Rule of Law is Possible

January 28, 2015

A Mexican UtopiaThe Mexico Institute is pleased to publish a new book by Wilson Center Global Fellow Luis RubioA Mexican Utopia: The Rule of Law is Possible.

“The proposal of the book is very simple, and appears utopian, thus its title: the President makes the Rule of Law his own and decides not to violate its elementary principles for the sake of expediency. That is, that he break with all legal, presidential and political tradition that has historically permitted presidents to adapt the laws to their own needs and convenience, to impose their will on legislative and judicial powers, to control the state governors and, in short, enjoy enormous, albeit temporary, power. As practically all former presidents have found after their mandate, that power was in the last analysis ephemeral. The proposal is to institutionalize political power by means of the elevation of the Rule of Law by the President of the Republic.”

Download the book here, available in both English and Spanish.


UPCOMING EVENT! A Mexican Utopia: Book Launch & Discussion of the Rule of Law in Mexico

January 26, 2015

justice - gavel and bookWHEN: Wednesday, January 28th, 9:00-11:00am

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC

The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to a book launch and discussion of the rule of law in Mexico. Wilson Center Global Fellow Luis Rubio will present his book A Mexican Utopia: The Rule of Law is Possible. After his presentation, several leading analysts will discuss the development of the rule of law in Mexico, noting challenges and offering policy prescriptions. Speakers will include Luis de la Calle, Veronica Ortiz-Ortega, Amb. Jeffrey Davidow, and Edna Jaime. We hope you are able to join us for what is sure to be an informative and interesting event.

“The proposal of the book is very simple, and appears utopian, thus its title: the President makes the Rule of Law his own and decides not to violate its elementary principles for the sake of expediency. That is, he break with all legal, presidential and political tradition that has historically permitted presidents to adapt the laws to their own needs and convenience, to impose their will on legislative and judicial powers, to control the state governors and, in short, enjoy enormous, albeit temporary, power. As practially all former presidents have found after their mandate, that power was in the last analysis ephemeral. The proposal is to institutionalize political power by means of the elevation of the Rule of Law by the President of the Republic.”
-Luis Rubio, A Mexican Utopia: The Rule of Law is Possible

To RSVP, click here.

To learn more about the event, click here. A live webcast will be available here.

Follow the conversation live on Twitter using #MXRuleofLaw


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