Abduction of Chapo’s Son May Signal War Between Mexico Cartels

08/16/16 InSight Crime

chapoA group of men that included a son of El Chapo Guzmán were abducted at gunpoint from an upscale restaurant in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, in what appears to be a high-level attack in the war between two of the country’s most powerful drug cartels.

According to the Attorney General’s Office in the state of Jalisco, where Puerto Vallarta is located, six menwere kidnapped on the evening of August 15 from a local gourmet restaurant called La Leche. However, the exact number of victims remains unclear; the same office previously said between 10 and 12 had been kidnapped and some local media outlets were reporting 16 victims.

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Mexico’s ‘Lord Audi’ sets social media on fire

08/01/2016 Fusion

biciMexicans are once again using the power of social media to shame the elite class who hide behind privilege…[and]… think they’re above the law.

The latest incident involves a young man in Mexico City who was driving an Audi in the bicycle lane, apparently to avoid traffic, and started tailgating a cyclist who wouldn’t let him pass.

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Mexico Institute Materials on Anti-Corruption Efforts

Security and the Rule of LawOn Monday, as President Enrique Peña Nieto signed into law a new anti-corruption system, he apologized for a damaging conflict of interest scandal in 2014 surrounding his wife’s purchase of a $7m luxury home from a government contractor, an episode that hurt the Mexican people’s faith in the presidency and the government. “For this reason, with all humility I ask your forgiveness,” he said. “I reiterate my sincere and profound apology for the offense and indignation I have caused you.”

In light of the ratification of the anti-corruption reform, I would like to share with you our recent work on anti-corruption efforts in Mexico.

Sincerely,

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute

Anti-Corruption

Mexico Wins: Anti-Corruption Reform Approved

Fighting Corruption in Mexico

Mexico Today: Analyzing the Country’s Reforms

Mexico’s Reforms and the Prospects for Growth

Mexican Civil Society’s Battle against Corruption: #Ley3de3

Mexico: The Fight Against Corruption

How to Make Mexico More Competitive: More Corporate Ethics & State Efficiency, Less Corruption

Mexico’s Battle Against Corruption

Mexico Corruption Perception Index 2015

Corruption, A Central Issue in the Campaigns

The Mexican State and Anti-Corruption Efforts

Additionally, check out our recent work on rule of law in Mexico.

The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

Book Launch | The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

Mexico and the United States: Combating Illicit Finance Together

Mexico Security Review 2016: Assessing the Outlook for the Rule of Law

A Mexican Utopia: Book Launch & Discussion of the Rule of Law in Mexico

A Mexican Utopia: The Rule of Law is Possible

A Way to Restore Mexico’s Trust Deficit

Four Rule of Law Policies to Make Mexico Grow

The Mexican State and Transparency

The State of Citizen Security in Mexico: 2014 in Review and the Year Ahead

Mexico Wins: Anti-Corruption Reform Approved

7/12/2016 The Expert Take, By Viridiana Rios

expert I (2)Mexico just approved an anti-corruption reform that required changing 14 constitutional articles, drafting 2 new general laws, and reforming five more. This is not minor. The reform is, by far, the most encompassing system to identify and sanction corruption that the country has ever had and its effects will be felt quite soon.

In this text, I present the story of how Mexico got here and provide an assessment of the virtues and challenges of this change.

The Government tries to fight corruption

The need to create an entity to fight corruption was among Mexico’s policy priorities, at least rhetorically, since well before the arrival of Enrique Peña Nieto to the presidency.  However, the first of the 266 commitments that Peña Nieto had made during his campaign was to create a “National Anti-Corruption Commission” (NAC).

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Estado de Derecho, tenencia de la tierra y seguridad, amenazas para la Energética, dice Duncan Wood

6/27/2016 Energia Hoy

El Wilson Center es un organismo independiente que honra la memoria del veintiochoavo presidente de Estados Unidos.

Una de sus áreas es el Mexico Institute donde analizan los principales temas que afectan a nuestro país pero, como es natural con un enfoque de la relación con EU.

El tema que cubrimos fue la Reforma Energética y las barreras en su implementación.

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EVENT FRIDAY | The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

problem of powerWHEN: Friday, June 24, 2016, 10:00-11:30 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute invites you to a book launch and discussion on Mexico’s political system. Wilson Center Global Fellow Luis Rubio will present his book, The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government. After his presentation, leading analysts will discuss the system of governance and concentration of power in Mexico, as well as policy prescriptions to improve Mexico’s political system.

The Problem of Power is a reflection of the internal and external causes of the weakness of the Mexican political system, as well as an analysis of the opportunities to transform it. As stated in the introduction, the main message of the book is the need to build institutions and strengthen the rule of law based on due process so that government and the political sector in Mexico is more responsive to its citizens’ needs and aspirations and less focused on preserving the benefits inherent in the status quo. This implies a need for the transformation and professionalization of all three branches of government at all three levels, municipal, state and federal.

Download the book (available in both English and Spanish)

Speakers

Luis Rubio
Global Fellow & Advisory Board Member, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center
President, Centro de Investigación para el Desarrollo (CIDAC)

Verónica Ortiz-Ortega
Political Analyst, El Economista and Canal del Congreso

Oliver Azuara
Economics Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

EVENT FRIDAY – Book Launch | The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

problem of powerWHEN: Friday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute invites you to a book launch and discussion on Mexico’s political system. Wilson Center Global Fellow Luis Rubio will present his book, The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government. After his presentation, leading analysts will discuss the system of governance and concentration of power in Mexico, as well as policy prescriptions to improve Mexico’s political system.

The Problem of Power is a reflection of the internal and external causes of the weakness of the Mexican political system, as well as an analysis of the opportunities to transform it. As stated in the introduction, the main message of the book is the need to build institutions and strengthen the rule of law based on due process so that government and the political sector in Mexico is more responsive to its citizens’ needs and aspirations and less focused on preserving the benefits inherent in the status quo. This implies a need for the transformation and professionalization of all three branches of government at all three levels, municipal, state and federal.

Download the book (available in both English and Spanish)

Speakers

Luis Rubio
Global Fellow & Advisory Board Member, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center
President, Centro de Investigación para el Desarrollo (CIDAC)

Verónica Ortiz-Ortega
Political Analyst, El Economista and Canal del Congreso

Oliver Azuara
Economics Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

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