EVENT TOMORROW | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tomorrow, September 27, 2:00-4:00pm

WHERE: Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP.

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP

UPCOMING EVENT | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 2:00-4:00 PM

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP

UPCOMING EVENT | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 2:00-4:00pm

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP.

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP.

Study estimates sugary drinks more deadly than violent crime in Mexico

07/02/15 USA Today

Photo by Flickr user Kidjay

GUADALAJARA, Mexico — Mexico is renowned for being one of the most dangerous countries in the world, so it might sound strange to hear that sugary drinks pose a bigger threat to life here than violent crime.

Sugar-sweetened beverages such as Coca-Cola, Gatorade and homemade drinks known as “agua fresca” kill far more people every year in Mexico than criminal gangs.

A study by the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University estimates a staggering 24,000 Mexicans die each year from diabetes, cancer and heart disease that are linked to sugary drinks.

Read more…

Mexico restricts soft drink TV ads to fight obesity

Obese man07/16/14 BBC News,

Mexico is restricting television advertising for high-calorie food and soft drinks, as part of its campaign against obesity, the government says. Such ads will be banned with immediate effect on terrestrial and cable TV between 14:30 and 19:30 on weekdays and between 07:30 and 19:30 at weekends. Restrictions will also be imposed on similar ads shown at the cinema. Seventy percent of adults and 30% of children in Mexico are obese or overweight, official figures suggest.

Read more….

Mexico enacts soda tax in effort to combat world’s highest obesity rate

Coca Cola BottlesThe Guardian, 01/16/2014

A groundbreaking tax on sugar-sweetened beverages recently passed in Mexico could provide the evidence needed to justify similar laws across low- and middle-income countries and cities in the US, experts believe.

Campaigners and public health experts are watching closely to see what impact Mexico’s tax has on consumption. Mexico, where 32.8% of the population is obese, is now the country with the biggest weight problem in the world, according to the UN’s Food and Agricultural Organisation, overtaking the United States. The impact on health has been serious – 14% of the population has diabetes. Rates of high blood pressure, which can lead to stroke and heart attacks, are also high.

Read more…

Health Battle Over Soda Flares in Mexico

Obese manThe Wall Street Journal, 8/28/2013

The public-health battle over sugary soft drinks, punctuated by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg‘s failed attempt to ban big sodas, has spread to Mexico, long a stronghold of Coca-Cola Co.

This summer, a series of ads splashed across buses, billboards and along subway platforms here in the capital showed 12 heaping spoonfuls of sugar next to a roughly 20-ounce bottle of soda. The ads asked: “Would you eat 12 spoonfuls of sugar? Why do you drink soda?” The ad campaign has fueled a fledgling movement to rein in Mexico’s heavy soda consumption.

Read more…