Migrant protesters occupy U.S.-Mexico border bridge, close crossing

asylum_tijuana_caravan_1222

10/10/19 – Reuters

By Veronica G. Cardenas

U .S. asylum seekers camped out in a dangerous Mexican border town occupied a bridge to Brownsville, Texas on Thursday, leading to the closure of the crossing, witnesses and authorities said.

Hundreds of the migrants have been camped for weeks on the end of the bridge in Matamoros, Mexico, a city known for cartel control of people trafficking and gang violence.

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Thousands march in protest against Mexico’s president

5/5/2019 – Reuters

roboBy Josue Gonzalez

Several thousand people marched through Mexico City on Sunday to demand the resignation of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in the first major protest against the leftist leader in the capital since he took office five months ago.

Largely dressed in white, protesters marched down the capital’s main thoroughfare, with many chanting: “AMLO, out!” using the president’s nickname, based on his initials.

Some covered their mouths with masking tape on which they had written: “AMLO resign.” Others waved signs bearing slogans including “Mexico isn’t yours” and “You’re not Robin Hood.”

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Goldcorp says protest could halt production at Mexico gold mine

06/11/2018 Reuters

Protestors and police - Jesus Villaseca Perez (Flickr)Canada’s Goldcorp said on Monday an ongoing protest blocking entry to its Penasquito mine, one of Mexico’s biggest gold producers, could force the company to halt output.

The mine, in northern Zacatecas state, produced 476,000 ounces of gold last year, comprising 18 percent of Goldcorp’s total production and generating more than 33 percent of its revenue.

The demonstration began on June 1, led by local truck-drivers who say the company reneged on promises to hire locally.

Local residents also blocked access at the mine last year, protesting for more than a week over a water dispute. The company later said it was able to resume normal operations without a hit to production.

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Mexico March Seeks President’s Resignation

09/15/16 ABC News

15924370276_85700142bd_o.jpgA social media campaign drew hundreds to a march demanding President Enrique Pena Nieto’s resignation as Mexico prepared for its annual independence celebration.

The turnout Thursday was small for a march in a city of 20 million residents, mostly drawing young people. But its timing reinforced the country’s dissatisfaction with Pena Nieto.

The president suffers from abysmal approval ratings that risk plunging even more after last month’s widely ridiculed meeting with U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. His party in June lost gubernatorial elections in four states it had never lost before.

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Trump casts a shadow over Mexico’s most important patriotic holiday

09/15/16 The Washington Post

Donald Trump’s rhetoric about immigrants has haunted Mexico for months. On Thursday, the candidate cast a shadow over the country’s independence day celebrations, with protesters criticizing President Enrique Peña Nieto for having met with the Republican presidential hopeful.

“A lot of people, including me, see this as treason,” said Eduardo Martínez Rodríguez, a psychology student marching against the president. “Peña Nieto invited him and didn’t say to his face what he said earlier in an interview,” when he compared Trump’s rhetoric to Hitler and Mussolini. “This guy [Trump] basically came and vomited in Los Pinos” (the presidential palace).

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New Publication: Addressing the Concerns of the Oil Industry: Security Challenges in Northeastern Mexico and Government Responses

By Kathryn Haahr

telecomunicaiconesThe December 2013 Constitutional Reform and August 2014 secondary legislation to permit private investment in Mexico’s oil and gas sector represents significant opportunities for private oil and gas companies. While overall geopolitical risk landscape in Mexico is low, cartel-related violence and other criminal activities continue to draw concern from international oil companies and other foreign investors. Homicide, kidnapping, extortion, attacks on facilities and organized public unrest challenge regional governance and have the potential to impact a number of stages of the oil and gas value chain. As foreign energy companies prepare to bid on Round One contracts, the Mexican Government, state security entities, and civilian security organizations have begun to put in place the elements of a more secure operational environment.

This case study analyzes the Mexican Government’s response to recent threats to and attacks against energy infrastructure and personnel in Tamaulipas and Veracruz. The government is addressing the issue of cartel-induced violence in Tamaulipas and Veracruz by mobilizing security frameworks for newly established and existing state law enforcement entities and the Military. The security arrangements, that include policing of major ports and protecting Pemex facilities and operations, should help the oil and gas industry to better absorb the financial risks to its business operations.

Read the publication here…

Obama Pledges to Help Mexico Eliminate ‘Scourge’ of Violence

1/6/2015 NBC News

The Associated Press October 22, 2014
The Associated Press October 22, 2014

While critics protested outside the White House, President Barack Obama pledged to help Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto “eliminate the scourge and violence of drug cartels” like that suspected in the disappearance of 43 Mexican students.

Peña Nieto made his first visit to Washington Tuesday, accompanied by several Cabinet members, to tout his economic reforms such as the opening of the its oil and gas industry to private investment.

But his legislative feats have been overshadowed by the violence against 43 students, some whose bodies were said to have been later incinerated, and criticism of how his administration has handled the investigation of the students’ disappearance.

NEW PUBLICATION: Addressing the Concerns of the Oil Industry: Security Challenges in Northeastern Mexico and Government Responses

By Kathryn Haahr

8380385183_92df689d14_zThe December 2013 Constitutional Reform and August 2014 secondary legislation to permit private investment in Mexico’s oil and gas sector represents significant opportunities for private oil and gas companies. While overall geopolitical risk landscape in Mexico is low, cartel-related violence and other criminal activities continue to draw concern from international oil companies and other foreign investors. Homicide, kidnapping, extortion, attacks on facilities and organized public unrest challenge regional governance and have the potential to impact a number of stages of the oil and gas value chain. As foreign energy companies prepare to bid on Round One contracts, the Mexican Government, state security entities, and civilian security organizations have begun to put in place the elements of a more secure operational environment.

This case study analyzes the Mexican Government’s response to recent threats to and attacks against energy infrastructure and personnel in Tamaulipas and Veracruz. The government is addressing the issue of cartel-induced violence in Tamaulipas and Veracruz by mobilizing security frameworks for newly established and existing state law enforcement entities and the Military. The security arrangements, that include policing of major ports and protecting Pemex facilities and operations, should help the oil and gas industry to better absorb the financial risks to its business operations.

Read the publication here…

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s 5 mountainous challenges for 2015

1/5/2015 GlobalPost.com

7510812870_91063f01b1_zAmid violence, scandals, and a sinking peso, his [Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto] popularity rating tumbled 20 points to 39 percent, according to a new Reforma newspaper poll.

It is not only his lowest level since he took power in December 2012, but the worst of any Mexican president since 1995, after the peso tanked in the so-called tequila crisis…

Hoping to turn things around in 2015, Peña Nieto released a new year video, showing images of protests and violence transforming into images of progress and happiness. “We leave behind a year of challenges and learning,” Peña Nieto tweeted. “With integrity and determination, let’s welcome 2015.”

Making such a transformation a reality looks like an uphill struggle. Here are five mountainous challenges that the president faces in 2015…

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Mexico Faces Growing Gap Between Political Class and Calls for Change

12/12/2014 The New York Times

Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images
Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

As the Nobel Peace Prize was being awarded in Oslo this week, a young man dashed on stage, unfurled a Mexican flag streaked with red paint and begged for help for his country because more than 40 college students have been missing for months after clashing with the police.

At the Latin Grammy Awards ceremony in Las Vegas last month, the big winners, Calle 13, shouted solidarity with the victims as they performed. At home, mass marches have regularly filled Mexican streets with angry calls for the government to act against corruption and crime.

But is the country’s political class listening?

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