Headlines from Mexico

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1. On Saturday, October 29, Mexico City hosted its first ever Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) parade. The celebration dates back to Aztec and pre-Columbian times. It’s a celebration of life and teaches people not to be afraid of death. The festival’s also an opportunity to honor the dead.  The idea for the parade was born out of the imagination of a scriptwriter for the James Bond movie Spectre ; more than 250,000 people attended the parade.

Read more: El Universal, Excelsior, La Jornada, Animal Político

2. The Secretary of Foreign Affairs Claudia Ruiz Massieu asserted, this Thursday at the Mexican Senate, that she was aware of the decision to invite the Republican candidate Donald Trump to meet President Enrique Peña Nieto in Los Pinos. Ruiz Massieu responded that she believed that the dialogue with the Republican candidate was necessary given his derogatory comments and limited knowledge of Mexico. The majority of the Senate vocally criticized this decision and question Ruiz Massieu’s role that was previously unclear. The Senators also asked the Secretary what was the strategy if Trump won the elections on Tuesday to which she replied that the Mexican government will engage with the President elect the night of election no matter the result.

Read more: Expansión, Proceso, El Universal, Milenio, Aristegui Noticias

3. The volatility of the peso in response to the U.S. elections has cause dthe peso to fall to an all-time price of $19.50 this Tuesday as Trump’s poll numbers increased. This a 1.8% from the price at which it had closed the day before. The Mexican Stock Exchange also suffered a shock with a fall of 1.47%. On Thursday, Carstens, the Central Bank Governor, announced that the Bank of Mexico has already come up with a contingency plan that has been discussed with Meade, the Secretary of Finance and Public Credit, in the event that Donald Trump given that the peso could fall by almost 10% in a matter of weeks if he wins.

Read more: Excelsior, El Universal, El Financiero, Expansión, La Jornada

4. This week, the leader of the National Action Party, Ricardo Anaya came under strong criticism about his personal finances. It was published that Anaya’s family lives in Atlanta, Georgia and that yearly expenses to cover the standard of living of his family and the constant travelling the party leader takes to visit them, amounts to up to 4.5 million pesos.  Anaya responded to criticism affirming that his family is his priority and that having them in the U.S. is a temporary investing that prioritizes the future of his children. He also announced that all these expenses had been publicly declared through the 3 de 3 declaration and denied that any of these expenses come from party funds or that his role as party leader is compromised by the constant travelling.  Party leaders  have still been critical, the president of the PRI, claims that the rent that Anaya receives from the property he owns is not in his declaration and Alejandra Barrales, President of PRD, reiterated that Anaya needs to justify where the funds come from.

Read more: Milenio, El Universal, Excelsior, Animal Político 

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Headlines from Mexico

 

newspapers logo2-011. Political leaders across Mexico have gain traction on their anti-corruption campaign in Mexico. Leaders from PRI, PAN, PVEM all have spoken in accordance in support of the citizen led Law ‘3de3’ initiative to help bring transparency to the public service and bring more confidence to the citizen’s of Mexico.

Read more: El Universal, Excelsior, Milenio, El Universal

2.In response to the remarks made by Donald Trump toward the Mexican people and this Tuesday’s  U.S. mini Super Tuesday primary, Mexican politicians, specifically in the PRD party and citizens are rallying in an Anti-trump campaign on Social Media with hashtag ‘MxcontraTrump’ (Mexico Against Trump).

Read more: Excelsior, Reforma, Milenio, Milenio

3. Mexico City has experienced the worst smog in 11 years and has declared a Phase 1 pollution alert. Smog on the city’s northern edge reached 1.3 times acceptable limits in the afternoon.Political leaders in the city have shared statements of potential pollution controls but not official plan has been declared.

Read more: Reforma, Dinero, El Universal

4.  The state of Mexico had begun refusing to accept Mexico city’s garbage this week after Mexico City Mayor Miguel Ángel Mancera blamed surrounding states for sending pollution into the city. Mancera has since announced that the state of Mexico and Morales will push forward in acting to limiting the amount of cars on the road and the problem of garbage disposal.

Read more: Milenio, El Financiero, Jornada, Milenio,

Upcoming Event! Mexico’s Midterm Elections and the Peña Nieto Administration

Collage only_MonochromeWHEN: Monday, May 18, 9:30-11:00am

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Click here to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to an event on Mexico’s 2015 midterm elections. On June 7, 2015, more than 86 million Mexicans will have the opportunity to elect 500 federal deputies, 17 state-level legislatures, 9 governors, and more than 300 mayors. This new cohort of legislators will replace the group that approved the major reforms proposed by President Enrique Peña Nieto during the first year of his administration. The new Chamber of Deputies will be crucial for the second half of Peña Nieto’s term in office; finding room for negotiation may prove increasingly difficult as the presidential succession nears.

These elections represent a battle in which the PRI seeks to stay strong despite the President’s low approval ratings. Meanwhile, the PAN and the PRD are trying to overcome internal divisions and emerge stronger. The PRD’s internal challenges became external with the recent founding of MORENA, led by Andrés Manuel López Obrador, which is emerging as a viable option for voters on the left. In fact, MORENA will be competing head to head with the Green Party (PVEM) to be the fourth national political force.

Speakers

Denise Dresser
Political Analyst and Professor, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México

Luis Carlos Ugalde
Director General, Integralia Consultores

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

RSVP here. 

Want to know more about Mexico’s midterm elections? Visit the Mexico Institute’s 2015 Election Guide.

Mexico conservative party leader Madero stands down temporarily

09/30/14 Reuters

panThe leader of Mexico’s biggest opposition party is stepping aside temporarily to seek a congressional seat next year at which time he could resume his post as party leader. Gustavo Madero, head of the center-right National Action Party (PAN), was immediately replaced at the helm by his deputy, the party said in a post on Twitter on Tuesday. Madero has been grappling with an internal power struggle over how far his party should have cooperated with President Enrique Pena Nieto’s centrist Institutional Revolutionary Party on a wide-ranging economic reform agenda. The PAN’s new interim president is 35-year-old Ricardo Anaya, previously the party’s second-ranking official as well as a former federal congressman who served as president of Mexico’s lower chamber of Congress earlier this year.

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General Secretary of PAN Party Assassinated in Guerrero State, Mexico

09/28/14 TELESUR

panOn Sunday, a group of unknown people murdered Braulio Zaragoza Maganda, the general secretary of National Action Party, one of the three main political parties in Mexico. Zaragoza was in a restaurant in a hotel of Acapulco when three gunshots killed him at around 8.30 a.m., informed the Public Ministry, quoted by Mexican press agency Notimex. The general attorney will investigate the murder, added the statement. The national president of PAN, Gustavo Madero, also requested a deep investigation. “The atmosphere of insecurity and impunity experienced in Mexico” can not be tolerated, he stated.

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Mexico conservatives replace congressional whip following party scandal

08/13/14 Fox News

panMexico’s conservative National Action Party has replaced its congressional minority leader after he and other party leaders were seen on a video dancing with escorts.

The party is known as the PAN and has often taken moralistic positions, like banning public kissing in one city it governs.

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Mexican protest over regulations should not derail energy reform

shutterstock_105329711FuelFix, 3/17/14

An opposition party protest in Mexico over proposed energy reform laws is not likely to significantly delay the opening of the nation’s oil and gas reserves to foreign companies, a legal expert said Monday. On Thursday, the Senate leader of the National Action Party, or PAN, walked out of congressional negotiations on laws necessary to implement the reform legislation passed in December. The politician protested the amount of authority the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, has proposed to retain, according to Gabriel Salinas, an attorney at Mayer Brown focused on the Mexican oil and gas sector, who is closely following the progress of the reforms.

The PAN has since issued a list of concerns about the congressional negotiations over the  rules that will govern the opening of Mexico’s energy sector to private investment. Under the new constitutional amendments, Mexican lawmakers were given an April 20 deadline to develop more specific legal guidelines for how the energy reforms would be implemented, including how oil profits would be handled.

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