UPCOMING EVENT | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 2:00-4:00 PM

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP

UPCOMING EVENT | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 2:00-4:00pm

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP.

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP.

Study: Mexico’s Junk-Food Tax Cut Purchases by 5.1 Percent

07/05/2016 The New York Times

chatarraMEXICO CITY — Mexico’s 8 percent tax on high-calorie snacks has been successful in reducing junk food purchases, but only by a small amount and only among poor and middle-class households, a study said Tuesday.

The report published in the online journal PLOS-Medicine showed an average reduction of 5.1 percent in purchases of items subject to the tax, which was implemented in 2014. The reduction equaled only about 25 grams (0.88 ounces) per month per person.

Read more…

Coca-Cola Launches Mid-Calorie Soda in a Mexico Battling Its Bulge

08/25/14 The Wall Street Journal

Coca-Cola Co. is introducing a mid-calorie cola here in its second-biggest market by sales volume and a country that’s struggling to shed the pounds.

Mexicans drink more Coca-Cola products per capita than consumers in any other country, so the company’s introduction of Coca-Cola Life, sweetened in part by the stevia plant, may be of some importance in a country battling obesity and a rise in diabetes and related health problems.

Read more…

Mexico Plays the Heavy on Food Ads

08/21/14 The Wall Street Journal

Obese manMexican authorities are restricting food marketing to children on television and in movie theaters, part of an attack plan against rising health problems as Mexicans get fatter.

The new limits, which became effective in mid-July, go far beyond any measures taken in the U.S. to restrict food advertising. With a third of children in Mexico overweight, and the country’s entire population struggling with a high rate of Type 2 diabetes, the government of President Enrique Peña Nieto pitched the restrictions as a tough follow-on to the adoption this year of special taxes on sugary beverages and calorie-dense snacks.

Read more…

Mexico food labeling rules draw fire on sugar

Obese manThe Washington Post, 4/21/14

Mexico’s new food labeling rules were supposed to help fight an obesity epidemic, but activists and experts said Monday they may actually encourage the public to consume high levels of sugar. The debate over sugar has grown bitter, in a country with one of the highest obesity rates in the Western Hemisphere.

The new label rules unveiled last week list the amount of sugar and other contents as a percent of recommended daily intakes. The new labels will no longer list the weights of the ingredients, instead simply listing them as calories and percentages of recommended daily intake.

But the labels assume that an average acceptable daily consumption of sugar is about 360 calories, equivalent to about 90 grams of sugar. The World Health Organization has proposed a sugar intake of as little as 100 calories or about 25 grams per day.

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Mexico City Bets on Tap Water Law to Change Habit

woman shopping for water in big box storeAbc News, January 24, 2014

“Drink the water.” It’s a suggestion alien to Mexico City residents who have long shunned tap water in favor of the bottled kind and to the throngs of tourists who visit the city each year, bringing with them fears of “Montezuma’s Revenge.” But a law recently approved by Mexico City’s legislators will require all restaurants to install filters so they can offer patrons free, drinkable water that won’t lead to stomach problems and other ailments.

“We need to create a culture of water consumption,” said Dr. Jose Armando Ahued, health secretary for Mexico City. “We need to accept our water.” Bad tap water accounts in part for Mexico being the world’s top consumer of bottled water and — worse — soda, some 43 gallons per person a year. With an obesity epidemic nationwide, the city’s health department decided to back the water initiative.

Read more…