Mexico Overtakes Canada as No. 2 U.S. Exporter Ahead of Trump

6/12/16 Bloomberg

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Mexico is overtaking Canada as the No. 2 exporter of goods to the U.S. this year, in a sign of how economic ties have deepened between the two countries even as the relationship is being questioned by President-elect Donald Trump.

Shipments from Mexico totaled $245 billion in the first 10 months of the year, according to Commerce Department figures released Tuesday, ahead of Canada’s $230 billion. If the trend continues, it would be the first time ever the U.S. bought more imports from its neighbor to the south. The two countries ended 2015 tied in exports to the U.S.

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‘Mexico is waking up’: The game has changed in North America

11/10/16 Business Insider

flags 3 countriesThe idea of Donald Trump as president is starting to settle in. What a Donald Trump presidency looks like in practice remains to be seen.

It’s not known how much of Trump’s stated plans he intends to pursue in office, or even how much of them he would be able to implement.

But the stances he’s taken and the way he’s taken them suggest relations in North America may be about to change — and not for the better.

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5 Reasons Why North American Retirees Are Flocking To Mexico

08/27/2016 The Huffington Post

AcapulcoDCurrent estimates put the number of U.S. and Canadian citizens living in various places in Mexico at well over one million. Not all are retired, but hundreds of thousands of them are. This easily makes Mexico the world’s most popular overseas retirement destination for U.S. and Canadian citizens. Remember, this is the country that one U.S. presidential candidate thinks is so bad that it should be walled off from the rest of North America.

What makes so many North Americans disagree? What makes Mexico the world’s biggest draw for U.S. and Canadian citizens looking outside their own countries for a quality retirement? We can think of five reasons off the top of our heads.

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North America’s Anti-Brexit Moment

6/28/2016 Bloomberg View

This week’s meeting among the leaders of the U.S., Mexico and Canada might have been a mostly forgettable formality — had British voters not just decided to leave the European Union. Add in Donald Trump’s shrill threats to tear up trade agreements and build walls, and presidents Barack Obama and Enrique Pena Nieto and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau face a need to reaffirm, and strengthen, their own growing ties.

Luckily, these leaders have a pretty good story to tell. Canada, Mexico and the U.S. are one another’s most important trading partners. The U.S. exports more than four times as much to Mexico and Canada as it does to China, and more than twice as much as to the EU. Well-developed supply chains mean that more than 40 percent of the value of U.S. imports from Mexico, and 25 percent of those from Canada, originates in the U.S., compared with 2 to 5 percent for the EU, China, India and South Korea. Since 1993, North American trade has more than tripled, and cross-border investment has quintupled.

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North America Must Compete Globally

6/28/2016 Forbes

By Earl Anthony Wayne and Gary Hufbauer

NAFTAContrary to campaign rhetoric, the integration of North America over the past quarter century has successfully grown the continental economy and enabled it to compete in global markets. And, in North America this has been done without the centralized institutions that UK voters just rejected. The June 29 North American Leaders’ Summit in Ottawa offers an opportunity to launch even smarter collaboration across Canada, Mexico, and the United States that respects the sovereignty of each partner. President Barack Obama, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and President Enrique Peña Nieto can approve a range of actions to make the North American economy more competitive and productive in the years ahead.

North American trade networks and continental investment ties have generated millions of jobs. North America is the best performing continent among advanced countries. But it still needs to create more and better jobs. Economic growth is too slow and productivity is far below par. An ambitious work agenda coming from the Leaders’ Summit can help boost the three economies.

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North America’s Big Agenda

6/29/2016 The News

By Earl Anthony Wayne, Mexico Institute Public Policy Fellow

When Presidents Enrique Peña Nieto and Barack Obama join Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Ottawa on June 29 at the North American Leaders’ Summit (NALS), they will have two big tasks: First, to explain why cooperation between the three countries is of great value; and second, to approve an action agenda that will produce good results for economic growth, mutual security, the environment and international cooperation.

Since Mexico hosted the “Three Amigos” Summit in 2014, the U.S. political debate has turned critical of cooperation across the continent, spiced with toxic rhetoric aimed at Mexico. The leaders will meet as the U.K. vote has shaken the EU’s model of deep cooperation, and as all three North American economies need more growth and better performance. At the same time, collaboration and understanding between the three governments has improved significantly, and the connectivity between the economies has deepened. Mexican, Canadian and U.S. trade totals $1.2 trillion a year, with over $850 billion invested by the three countries in their neighbors’ economies, and the non-economic cooperation is vast.

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The Business Community is the Driving Force Behind North America’s Economic Strength

6/29/2016 The Hill

By Earl Anthony Wayne & Jodi Bond

On June 29, President Obama, Prime Minister Trudeau, and President Peña Nieto will meet in Ottawa for a North American Leaders Summit (NALS). While often ignored or criticized, America’s relations with Canada and Mexico touch the daily lives of more U.S. citizens than any other relationships in the world.  Positive, productive relations among neighbors will help generate the well-being and economic growth our citizens seek. What’s more important, we can now justifiably say that the peoples of the three countries are partners in ways that have never before been seen. In Ottawa, North America’s leaders can show the way to a more prosperous continent and seek to partner with the many stakeholders who stand to gain, especially the private sector that created today’s interconnected North American economy.

Despite the critics in the news, the U.S. has tens of millions of North America stakeholders. They range from the businesses and their employees who build and sell across the continent to the civil society groups who champion shared causes, and to the many citizens with family and heritage ties that cross our borders. These citizens have a direct interest in how well North America’s neighbors work together to grow our economies, guard our societies, and protect our shared environment. The work of the three leaders and government teams will be strengthened if they bring these stakeholders closer to the process of defining what Mexico, Canada and the U.S. do together.

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