COVID rising in the Americas, except in the US, Canada and Mexico

06/02/2021

Source: Aljazeera

Coronavirus infections are back on the rise in much of the Americas region after weeks of plateauing and decreasing in figures, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) said on Wednesday.

While the United States, Canada and Mexico are reporting an overall decline in cases and deaths, PAHO Director Carissa Etienne said, the rest of the Americas is seeing a rise in new cases, deaths and hospitalisations amid stalled vaccination efforts.

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COVID rising in the Americas, except in the US, Canada and Mexico

06/02/21

Source: Aljazeera

Coronavirus infections are back on the rise in much of the Americas region after weeks of plateauing and decreasing in figures, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) said on Wednesday.

While the United States, Canada and Mexico are reporting an overall decline in cases and deaths, PAHO Director Carissa Etienne said, the rest of the Americas is seeing a rise in new cases, deaths and hospitalisations amid stalled vaccination efforts.

READ MORE

What the U.S. election means for Canada and Mexico

10/13/2020

Source: The Washington Post

It’s been a tricky time to be an American neighbor. President Trump announced his candidacy for the White House in 2015 with a crude attack on Mexico, casting migrants from the country as interloping “rapists,” and later vowed to make Mexico pay for a wall on the southern U.S. border. In 2018, Trump wheeled on the country to the north, invoking national security concerns to slap tariffs on certain Canadian exports. He branded Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as “dishonest” and “very weak,” while bullying his way to a renegotiation of the free trade agreement linking the continent’s economies.

In the final year of his term, Trump arguably has better relations with Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador than with Trudeau. In July, López Obrador came to the White House to celebrate the signing of Trump’s rebranded version of the North American Free Trade Agreement. It was not markedly different from the treaty hashed out more than two decades ago, but it gave Trump another set-piece moment. Trudeau avoided the occasion, but López Obrador made it the first foreign outing of his presidency, no matter the rebukes of critics on both sides of the border.

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Trade War ‘Uncertainties’ Scramble Denim Sourcing Map

 

photo of blue denim textile
Photo by Engin Akyurt on Pexels.com

10/08/19 – Sourcing Journal

By Arthur Friedman

Mexico has leapfrogged China as the top supplier of denim apparel to the U.S., according to new data from the Commerce Department’s Office of Textiles & Apparel (OTEXA), as the impact of the trade war with the U.S. caused major shifts in sourcing even before 10 percent tariffs on Chinese apparel went into effect on Sept. 1.

Imports of the blue denim apparel, 97 percent of which are jeans, from China fell 13.47 percent to a value of $517.78 million in the year to date through August compared to the same period in 2018, OTEXA reported. In the same period, jeans imports from Mexico increased 8.84 percent to $558.86 million.

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Mexico ‘quite positive’ on USMCA ratification, Herrera says

5/7/2019 – Bloomberg

 

Watch the interview here…

Mexico says tariffs will send tomato prices soaring in US

5/4/2019 – Associated Press

tomatoMexico’s Economy Department says U.S. consumers could pay 38% to 70% more for tomatoes after the U.S. Commerce Department announced it would re-impose anti-dumping duties on Mexican imports.

The Mexican agency says the country exports about $2 billion in tomatoes to the United States and supplies about half the tomatoes the U.S. consumes annually.

It said Tuesday that many small- and medium-sized Mexican tomato exporters won’t be able to pay the deposits required to export.

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‘Don’t shoot yourself in the foot’: Inside Mexico’s campaign to save NAFTA

4/25/2019 – Reuters

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By Dave Graham

In April 2017, a group of Mexican executives filed into the Texas governor’s mansion in Austin for a meeting they hoped would help save a trillion-dollar trade deal.

They had a simple pitch for their audience – Republican Governor Greg Abbott, a handful of business leaders and some party donors: it would be in Texas’ best interest to preserve the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

Abbott was just one of the prominent names on a list of dozens of American politicians and business executives that Mexico would carefully compile to help save NAFTA from the relentless attacks of U.S. President Donald Trump.

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Exclusive: Mexican central bank in talks with Amazon about new mobile payments

The payment system, known as CoDi, is being built by central bank Banco de México, known as Banxico. CoDi will allow customers to make payments online and in person through smartphones free of charge using QR codes. It aims to bring more people into the formal financial sector.

A pilot rollout of CoDi is expected this month, Banxico has said.

Amazon and Argentine rival MercadoLibre have approached the bank about adopting the system, Jaime Cortina, Banxico’s director of operations and payments, told Reuters.

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Mexican Farmers Urge ‘Mirror’ Tariffs on Trump’s Rural Base

3/7/2019 – The New York Times

aerial-aerial-shot-agriculture-1595108.jpgBy Reuters

MEXICO CITY — Leaders of Mexico’s agricultural sector are urging “mirror measures” on U.S. farm imports in politically sensitive products such as yellow corn and poultry, in an effort they argue would counter decades of subsidized imports from the United States.

The three-month-old government of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is currently working on an updated list of products imported from its northern neighbor on which to possibly apply a second round of tariffs in response to U.S. measures imposed on Mexican steel and aluminum by the Trump Administration last year.

Last June, Mexico imposed tariffs of between 15 and 25 percent on steel products and other U.S. goods, in retaliation for the tariffs applied on the Mexican metals imports that Trump imposed citing national security concerns.

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Mexico won’t ratify new NAFTA if U.S. keeps tariffs on steel and aluminum

3/4/2019 – Financial Post

01-03-2019-FOTO-05-CONFERENCIA-DE-PRENSA-MATUTINA-1024x639.jpgOTTAWA — Mexico’s Congress will be asked to approve a major labour-reform bill this spring as a necessary step to ratifying the new North American free-trade pact later this autumn, say Mexican officials.

But unless the Trump administration lifts the punishing tariffs it has imposed on Mexican steel and aluminum imports — duties it also imposed on Canada — Mexico is prepared to keep the status quo with the 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement.

The push to improve workers’ rights in Mexico was a key priority for Canada and the United States during the rocky NAFTA renegotiation because they wanted to level the playing field between their workers and lower-paid Mexican workers, especially in the auto sector.

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