Headlines from Mexico

07/09/14 

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  1. Mexico’s lower house of Congress on Wednesday gave the final approval to the secondary laws of the telecoms reform.The bill has been sent to President Enrique Peña Nieto for publication. The secondary legislation on telecommunications reform was passed with 318 votes in favor and 107 abstentions. Read more from Milenio…
  2. In a surprise decision, América Móvil (AMX) – a company headed by Carlos Slim –  decided to sell part of Telcel and Telmex to reduce its national share below 50 percent. This cut means that the company will sell almost a 30% share, valued at US$20,000 million (1.3% of Mexico’s GDP). The company’s goal is to stop being “dominant operator” in terms of the Constitution and its secondary legislation, and again be able to operate freely in Mexico. The firm has presence in 26 countries and 292 million mobile customers, but in Mexico it has 35% of its sales. Read more from El País…
  3. In an interview with El Universal, Secretary of Foreign Affairs José Antonio Meade announced that the governments of Mexico and the Central American countries will form a joint response to confront the criminal groups that traffic human beings. He indicated that this anti-trafficking response will be one of the key strategies to deal with the humanitarian migrant crisis, especially in relation to unaccompanied minors. Read more from El Universal…
  4. Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto launched the Frontera Sur (South Border) program to protect migrants who enter Mexico primarily from Central America. The program will have five key components: 1) creation of temporary work permits for Guatemalan and Belizean migrants, 2) improvement of the twelve border crossings and establishment of five migrants care centers, 3) improvement of the shelters and detention centers for migrants mainly to give health services, 4) increase coordination mechanisms among the countries in the region mainly in security issues, and 5) increase interagency coordination in Mexico, work that will be led by the Secretaría de Gobernación (Ministry of the Interior). Read more from Excelsior…
  5. On Tuesday, the Mexican Senate resumed the discussion on secondary energy reform legislation that was interrupted in mid-June, because both parties (PRD and PAN) left the debate.The energy reform approved in 2013 consists of 21 laws, of which fourteen will be discussed in the Senate, while the lower house of Congress will discuss the remaining seven that comprise fiscal issues. Read more from Milenio…

In Mexico, tweeting about the drug war to fill the void of traditional media

Twitter_256x256Nieman Journalism Lab, 3/15/2013

A study on social media use in Mexico found that Twitter users are taking up the role of informal correspondents on the sidelines of the country’s ongoing drug war. In cities like Monterrey, Veracruz, and Saltillo, Twitter users are spreading the word on shootings, arrests, and clashes between the cartels and police. And, researchers say, they’ve developed a kind of media-esque ecosystem that values traits like sourcing and attribution.

This is far from the first time conflict and citizen media have risen hand in hand, a pattern repeated in countries like Egypt and Syria, among others. That’s because there’s a common set of circumstances in many of these situations: “For many Mexicans, social media has become a fluid and participatory information platform that augments and often replaces traditional news media and governmental institutions,” the study says.

Read more…

Weekly News Summary: March 15th

Coffee by Flikr user samrevelThe Mexico Institute’s “Weekly News Summary,” released every Friday afternoon summarizes the week’s most prominent Mexico headlines published in the English-language press, as well as the most engaging opinion pieces by Mexican columnists.

What the English-language press had to say…

On Monday, President Enrique Peña Nieto furthered his legislative agenda by unveiling plans to reform Mexico’s telecommunications and television sectors. The reforms, he introduced, “represent challenges for the businesses of this sector, but they also open new opportunities.” Televisa, led by Emilio Azcárraga, and América Móvil, owned by Carlos Slim, the world’s richest man, both issued statements welcoming the proposals. Reuters reported that while the reforms may significantly reduce both companies’ revenue, they may also represent an opportunity for Slim and Azcárraga “to make inroads into each other’s territory.”

The Financial Times was impressed with Peña Nieto’s boldness, pointing out that in his first 100 days as president, “he has taken on the rich and powerful in ways that seemed impossible less than a year ago.” The Economist, meanwhile, warned that if Peña Nieto’s reforms succeed, opposition parties may have a hard time gaining voters’ support in the 2018 presidential elections. Analysts highlighted the growing importance of the Pacto por México in advancing Peña Nieto’s legislative agenda, and anticipated tax and energy reforms are next on the list.

Continue reading “Weekly News Summary: March 15th”