Mexico’s three-billion-year-old underwater lifeforms

08/02/2021

Source: BBC

The beauty of Lake Bacalar Bacalar, according to Claudio Del Valle, goes deeper than the Mexican lagoon’s seven brilliant shades of blue, which range from bright turquoise to deep cobalt. Actually, the local tour guide says, up to 100m deeper – to the limestone bottom of the lake, which is home to the oldest life on the planet. Del Valle says that the most important thing when visiting the long, skinny lake near the Belize border is to leave no trace. He spent years taking groups on stand-up paddle boarding tours before dawn as the sun threw early light over the lagoon and sparkling thalassic hues matured out of the inky night.

“Thanks to the paddle boarding, I had the chance to explore most of the lagoon… it was so unique, so majestic, so beautiful,” he said. “The clarity of the water makes this unique colouration of blue to green; it was delightful just to appreciate.”

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EXCLUSIVE Mexico now ready to welcome private lithium miners

06/02/2021

Source: Reuters

Mexico’s leftist ruling party has dropped plans to nationalize lithium production and is now pushing to welcome private investors to help develop the country’s potential in the metal used to make batteries, the senior lawmaker behind the proposal told Reuters.

Mexico, a major copper and silver producer, is home to large potential reserves of lithium, used in electric vehicle (EV) batteries. Most of it is in hard-to-tap clay deposits that are costly and technically difficult to mine.

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Oil companies swap stakes in Mexico as government holds off on auctions

energy - oil pumps

12/04/19 – Reuters

By Marianna Parraga, Adriana Barrera

With Mexico’s government insisting that energy companies increase oil and gas output before it auctions off more of the country’s vast reserves or offers more partnerships with state-run Pemex, firms ranging from foreign majors to local players are scrambling to buy and sell blocks they already own.

The negotiations are creating a dynamic secondary market for oil acreage, which could be the only investment opportunity left for firms until leftist President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador unblocks his predecessor’s flagship energy reform that has seen no new licensing rounds since 2018.

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Mexican environment officials protest budget cuts

 

sky earth galaxy universe
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

10/13/19 – AP News

In a rare protest against his own administration, Mexico’s environment secretary decried 50% budget cuts to his agency and issued a public appeal for more funds Wednesday.

Environment Secretary Victor Toledo and the heads of ecological enforcement for almost all of Mexico’s 31 states signed an open letter appealing to all three levels of government to increase funding.

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Professor conducts research using trees in Mexico

green leaf plant on brown wooden stump
Photo by Joey Kyber on Pexels.com

11/07/19 – The Ithacan

By Krissy Waite

For the past nine years, Paula Turkon, assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences at Ithaca College, has been working on creating a timeline that can be used to date environmental and cultural changes in Northwestern Mexico using trees.

“The work that we’re doing is still preliminary,” Turkon said. “We’re building what we call a master sequence, and that can then be used to interpret things, but the construction of it is slow work because we don’t have anything to compare it to.”

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Amid climate worries, Mexico doubles down on fossil fuels

energy - oil pumps

11/01/19 – Reuters

by Oscar Lopez

On the same September day that activist Greta Thurnberg gave a fiery speech in New York demanding world leaders tackle climate change, Mexico’s president was touting achievements of a wholly different kind: increasing funding for oil production.

“We’re investing in refineries. It hasn’t been done for a long time,” President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador told reporters at a news conference in Mexico City.

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‘It’s where we come from’: the River People in Mexico left without a river

 

lake and mountains landscape
Photo by Adil Gökkaya on Pexels.com

10/22/19 – The Guardian

By Nina Lakhani

They are called the River People, but they no longer have a river.

Inocencia González is the traditional tribal elder of the Cucapá – the River People – in northern Mexico. She spends her days beading traditional chaquira jewellery to sell at the community museum, and reminiscing about happier times spent fishing for tilapia and mullet.

González grew up in the Colorado River delta when the mighty waterway and lakes provided abundant food, water, medicines and spiritual nourishment for her people to thrive.

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Saving Mexico’s Native Corn With Sustainable Furniture

red and black corn
Photo by Madison Inouye on Pexels.com

10/08/19 – Clean Technica

By Anne-Sophie Garrigou

As creators of desire, we are in a privileged position to change what people want and what they ask from the market.” — Fernando Laposse

Fernando Laposse is a Mexican designer who is drawing most of his inspiration from Mexico, its people, its craft, and their relationship to the natural world. Fernando strives to transform cheap and often waste materials to create gorgeous furniture. His projects aim to raise questions regarding whole system thinking, ephemerality, patterns of consumption and the politics of food production. We talked with Fernando about the role of design in raising awareness towards sustainable issues and he introduced us to one of its latest project: Totomoxtle, which showcases the range of species of native corn that exist in Mexico.

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Catholic Church launches environment network for Mesoamerica

Pope Francis leads his weekly general audience in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican
Reuters/Tony Gentile

10/04/19 – AP News

The Roman Catholic Church in Mexico and six Central American countries have launched a network to coordinate efforts to benefit the environment and indigenous people in the region.

The Vatican’s information service says that “like the Amazon, the Mesoamerican biological corridor is a devastated territory and threatened by state concessions to transnational corporations.”

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Mexican president says government not seeking to control Zama oilfield

oil

10/03/19 – Reuters

By David Alire Garcia

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Thursday that his government is not seeking to take control of the Zama oilfield discovery, which is currently operated by a private consortium led by U.S.-based Talos Energy.

Reuters reported earlier this week that Mexico’s national oil company, Pemex, wants to take control of Zama from Talos, which made the discovery on the edge of its block, adjacent to an area belonging to Pemex and where the find likely extends.

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