Mexico’s murder rate up, official warns of ‘narcoterrorism’

AMLO 6

11/21/19 – AP News

Mexico’s murder rate inched up 2% in the first 10 months of the year, but the latest violence has included much more brazen challenges to authorities.

Federal officials said late Wednesday there have been 29,414 homicides so far in 2019, compared to 28,869 in the same period of 2018.

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Cartel violence hit this artist’s family. So he illustrated a comic book about it

4/13/16 The Washington Post 

comicAMERICAN writer Justin Jordan knew he had a fertile idea for his fictional tale. He would delve into Mexican drug cartels. But which artist could render this story into riveting life?

He needed an illustrator who has a textured, firsthand understanding of Mexico, if not also its cartel violence.

The result: BOOM! Studios will unveil this summer’s Comic-Con a four-issue mini-series titled “Sombra” (Spanish for shadow). The series will debut July 20.

And its gifted artist? Mexico’s Raúl Treviño.

“I am an American — I am writing about this from a distance … ,” Jordan tells The Post’s Comic Riffs. “I feel an obligation to get it right, and no matter what — no matter how much research I do — there’s always going to be a distance between my experiences and the reality of what’s happening.

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Drug cartels have turned social-media sites like Facebook into one of their most potent weapons

4/13/16 Business Insider

facebookDrug trafficking has been the primary focus of Mexican cartels, providing most of their obscene profits and motivating much of the bloodshed they’ve caused.

But as cartels have expanded into other areas of operations, and as law-enforcement efforts have forced them to seek new moneymaking ventures, those cartels have started kidnapping and extorting Mexicans with more frequency.

And social-media sites like Facebook and Twitter have been a boon to these new criminal endeavors.

“Well, the extortion business is a profitable one for organized crime. And in countries like Mexico, it’s sadly pretty common that people get these threats,” Tom Wainwright, the author of “Narconomics” and the Economist’s former reporter in Mexico City, told Business Insider.

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EVENT TOMORROW! Follow-Up to the Investigations of the Disappearance of 43 Students in Iguala, Guerrero, Mexico

the_week_that_was_from_latin_america_and_caribbean_40482081WHEN: TOMORROW, October 21, 2:00-3:00pm

WHERE: 6th Floor Board Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

In September 2014, a group of 43 students from a teachers college disappeared in the southern Mexican city of Iguala in the state of Guerrero. Their disappearance left Mexicans horrified and outraged, shocked the international community, and led to nationwide protests.

Through an agreement with the Mexican government and the families of the disappeared students, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights appointed a group of international experts to provide technical assistance to the Mexican government in its investigation of this case. In September 2015, the results of the six-month investigation became known to the public. The results have been controversial as some experts agreed with the investigation’s findings of major holes in the government’s case, while others criticized it for its shortcomings. The Mexican government responded to the report by stating that they would carry out a new investigation and a second opinion from other renowned experts to determine what happened the night the students were presumably killed.

Please join us for an event following up on the investigations of the disappearance and a discussion on the implications for U.S. cooperation with Mexico.

Speakers

Under Secretary Roberto Campa
Under Secretary for Human Rights, Ministry of the Interior

Deputy Attorney General Eber Betanzos
Deputy Attorney General for Human Rights, Office of the Attorney General of the Republic

Under Secretary Miguel Ruiz Cabañas
Under Secretary for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights, Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Book Event on Violence in Guerrero this upcoming Thursday!

WHEN: Oct 8th 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

18007563A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico, particularly in Guerrero. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Click here to RSVP.

Event This Thursday! Prayers for the Stolen, A Discussion of Violence against Women in Mexico

18007563WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination.

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Click here to RSVP.

Upcoming Event! Book Event: Prayers for the Stolen, A Discussion of Violence against Women in Mexico

WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP. 

“Beguiling, and even crazily enchanting…Prayers for the Stolen gives us words for what we haven’t had words for before, like something translated from a dream in a secret language.” – New York Times Book Review

A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination.

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Keynote Speaker
Jennifer Clement, Author, Prayers for the Stolen

Moderator
Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

In Mexico, self defense groups battle a cartel

The Washington Post, 9/10/2013
m16 gun closeup

An audacious band of citizen militias battling a brutal drug cartel in the hills of central Mexico is becoming increasingly well-armed and coordinated in an attempt to end years of violence, extortion and humiliation.

What began as a few scattered self-defense groups has spread in recent months to dozens of towns across Michoacan, a volatile state gripped by the cultlike Knights Templar, a drug gang known for taxing locals on everything from cows to tortillas and executing those who do not comply.

The army deployed to the area in May, but the soldiers are mostly manning checkpoints. Instead, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto is facing the awkward fact that a group of scrappy locals appears to be chasing the gangsters away, something that federal security forces have not managed in a decade.

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Numb to Carnage, Mexicans Find Diversions, and Life Goes On

The New York Times, 5/17/12

Couples were walking hand in hand. Children were frolicking. Just down the road in this northern Mexican town, 49 bodies, headless with their hands and feet severed, had been found, then cleared away.

Francisco Umberta, alarmed by the latest in a string of unimaginably gory crimes linked to Mexico’s drug war, dealt with it by heading out on a date. A half-hour drive from where the torsos were discovered, he stood in line on Monday near a crowded Chili’s restaurant, waiting to buy movie tickets for “The Avengers.”

“Of course it is all scary,” he said of the massacre, which sadly set no record for carnage here, “but what are you going to do?” He had heard about the bodies on the radio shortly after they were discovered on Sunday, but said the regional soccer playoffs drew more public attention. “It’s not like we’re all paralyzed,” said Mr. Umberta, 31, an office clerk. ¨We still need to live while they do what they do.”

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Mexican presidential candidates mostly mute on drug wars

USA Today, 5/16/12

The discovery of 49 decapitated bodies on a highway leading to the U.S. border would seem like the time for Mexico’s presidential candidates to denounce the drug cartels and say how they will stop them. But none of the four candidates issued statements on the tragedy or posted comments on their Twitter accounts.

Not long after the news made headlines the world over, candidate Gabriel Quadri of the teacher-union-controlled New Alliance Party said via Twitter that the song Hot for Teacher was among his favorite Van Halen tunes. The reason for the silence, say political observers here, is no one has an answer for the violence.

“It’s an uncomfortable topic for which (the candidates) don’t have responses … or something clear to offer,” says Jorge Buendía, director of the polling firm Buendía & Laredo. The massacre in Nuevo León state, 95 miles from the U.S. border at McAllen, Texas, and two other mass murders over the prior 10 days, were reminders that drug cartels and organized crime remain serious threats to the rule of law in Mexico.

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