NAFTA May Have Saved Many Autoworkers’ Jobs

3/29/2016 The New York Times

When Donald Trump threatened to “break” the North American Free Trade Agreement, auto industry workers offered up some of the loudest cheers.

Mr. Trump easily won the Republican primary in Michigan this month. The state, home base for the American auto industry, also delivered an upset victory to Bernie Sanders, the Democratic anti-Nafta standard-bearer.

But the autoworkers’ animosity is aiming at the wrong target. There are still more than 800,000 jobs in the American auto sector. And there is a good case to be made that without Nafta, there might not be much left of Detroit at all.

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Nafta May Have Saved Many Autoworkers’ Jobs

3/29/16 New York Times

TLC_mapWhen Donald Trump threatened to “break” the North American Free Trade Agreement, auto industry workers offered up some of the loudest cheers.

Mr. Trump easily won the Republican primary in Michigan this month. The state, home base for the American auto industry, also delivered an upset victory to Bernie Sanders, the Democratic anti-Nafta standard-bearer.

But the autoworkers’ animosity is aiming at the wrong target. There are still more than 800,000 jobs in the American auto sector. And there is a good case to be made that without Nafta, there might not be much left of Detroit at all.

“Without the ability to move lower wage jobs to Mexico we would have lost the whole industry,” said Gordon Hanson of the University of California, San Diego, who has been studying the impact of Nafta on industries and workers since its inception more than two decades ago.

Even in the narrowest sense — to protect jobs in car assembly plants — a wall of tariffs against America’s southern neighbor would probably do more harm than good.

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Trump Victory Is Factor in Mexico’s Risk Models, Central Banker Says Eric Martin EMPosts

3/14/2016 Bloomberg 

Agustin_Carstens,_IMF_116DC2lgMexico central bank Governor Agustin Carstens said the possibility of a Donald Trump presidency is implicitly reflected in the risk models used by policy makers, after stressing the importance to Mexico’s economy of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

“Explicitly, no,” Carstens told El Financiero-Bloomberg TV’s Carlos Mota when asked if the risk of a Trump presidency is reflected in the central bank’s models, “but implicitly all of us have it in our heads.”

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Communidades Fronterizas Competitivas

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El Mexico Institute te invita a participar en la presentación del informe titulado “COMUNIDADES FRONTERIZAS COMPETITIVAS, MAPEO Y DESARROLLO DE INDUSTRIAS TRANSFRONTERIZAS MÉXICO-ESTADOS UNIDOS”. El evento se llevará a cabo en la Ciudad México el día 3 de marzo del 2016 de 12:00 -13:30 hrs. Este evento contará con la participación de representantes de ProMéxico, Mexico Institute, y North American Research Partnership.

Leer más

FAVOR DE CONFIRMAR SU ASISTENCIA CON

monica.meza@promexico.gob.mx Tel. 5447 7000 ext. 1231

Detalles del Evento :

3 de marzo del 2016 

12:00pm-13:30pm

Auditorio de ProMéxico
Oficinas Centrales

Camino a Santa Teresa # 1679,
Col. Jardines del Pedregal
Del. Álvaro Obregón
México, D.F.

 

La página del evento.

 

1,400 Workers ‘Devastated’ by Carrier’s Plan to Move Indianapolis Facility to Mexico

2/16/16 ABC News 

2000px-Logo_of_the_Carrier_Corporation.svgA union representing workers at an Indianapolis facility that recently announced it would be moving to Mexico — taking 1,400 U.S. jobs along with it — met with company representatives today but said there was “no hope” of stopping the move.

Carrier, which makes heating, ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, announced on Feb. 10 that it planned to relocate its Indianapolis, Indiana, manufacturing facility to Monterrey, Mexico, “over the course of an estimated three-year period.”

“It’s pretty damn bad when you’ve got people that figured they’d be able to retire there with some dignity and due to no fault of their own, now they’re finding out they’re not going to have a job,” Chuck Jones, the president of United Steelworkers Local 1999, told RTV6 today.

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Canada, Mexico win $1-billion sanctions against U.S. at WTO

12/7/2015 The Globe and Mail 

NAFTACanada and Mexico may impose tariffs onto U.S.-traded products worth about $1-billion (U.S.), a World Trade Organization panel ruled on Monday, as the countries prepared to retaliate over the United States’ meat-labelling rules.

A WTO arbitration panel set the annual level of retaliation at $1.055-billion (Canadian) for Canada and $228-million (U.S.) for Mexico, considerably less than the $3.068-billion (Canadian) and $713-million (U.S.) the two countries had asked for.

The dispute stems from a 2009 U.S. requirement that retail outlets use labels in the United States to give consumers more information about the origin of their food.

Canada and Mexico have argued that U.S. rules, known as COOL (country of origin labelling), led to fewer of their cattle and pigs being slaughtered and processed in the United States, costing farmers’ income.

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Mexico’s falling electricity rates draw manufacturers

08/11/15 CNBC

light bulbIt just got a lot cheaper to turn the lights on in Mexico.

A number of factors influenced the country’s slow but steady rise as a manufacturing hub for multinational corporations, including its membership in NAFTA, other trade agreements, cheap labor costs and its proximity to the United States.

But observers point to another recent development that they see accelerating investment in Mexico and boosting economic productivity: Electricity is getting cheaper.

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