Mass grave found in northern Mexico

9/2/15 Yahoo News

Grave photo credit Kelly DonlanA mass grave has been found in northern Mexico, authorities said Tuesday, as a rights group indicated it could contain 31,000 bone fragments corresponding to at least 31 bodies.

The pit was discovered on a ranch in the town of Salinas Victoria, some 35 kilometers (22 miles) north of the industrial hub of Monterrey, said a spokeswoman for the Nuevo Leon state prosecutor’s office, Priscila Rivas.

“The ranch was found through statements by detained criminals, information from victims and investigations by the prosecutor’s office,” Rivas told AFP.

The spokeswoman declined to say how many pieces of bones were unearthed or how many bodies they could represent.

But Consuelo Morales, who heads the Citizens Supporting Human Rights (CADHAC), said authorities told her organization that 31,000 bone fragments were found since the grave was detected earlier this year.

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10 Dead in Attack on Beer Distributor in Northern Mexico

06/22/15 ABC News

Photo by Kirinqueen

At least 10 people are dead after armed men attacked a beer distribution center on the outskirts of the northern city of Monterrey, Mexican authorities said Friday.

Nuevo Leon State Attorney General Javier Flores told a news conference that authorities are investigating the possibility that the attack involved organized crime. He said drugs and a weapon were found at the scene.

A state government official speaking on condition of anonymity earlier told The Associated Press that the attackers invaded the property, demanded money from the workers and then started shooting. The official was not authorized to discuss the incident publicly.

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Connections Matter in Mexico’s Northern Border Region

08/20/14 Huffington Post. By Indre Biskis

Monterrey-Nathaniel C. SheetzMonterrey, Mexico is a city split by a large river, but that is not the only divide. Deep economic and social gaps separate rich from poor, educated from uneducated, legal from illegal. The population was further split when a highway was constructed right through its city center, solidifying the already significant schism.

Monterrey, the capital of the Nuevo Leon region, is a business-industrial city with a population over 1 million. In 2005, it was ranked as the safest city in Latin America and Mexico. However, since 2008, the city started experiencing violence related to turf battles between warring drug cartels, degrading a city with great economic potential to one full of fear. Drug use and high murder rates continue to steal the lives of youth, tempting those who lack the skills for traditional jobs into much higher-paying, high-risk careers of narcotics and crime.

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U.S. and Mexico could be connected by multi-billion-dollar high speed train

mexico-usa-flag-montageThe Mail, 01/17/2014

A multi-billion-dollar high-speed train network linking America with Mexico moved a step closer as officials from both sides of the border thrashed out details.

The proposed 300 mile route would link San Antonio, Texas, to Monterrey, Mexico – slashing the current journey time from five hours by car to under two hours.

Advocates say the project, which would be the first high-speed train line in North America and is set to be completed by 2018, will provide huge economic boost to regions in both nations.

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Monterrey emerging from shadow of drug violence

Monterrey, NLThe Los Angeles Times, 10/23/2013

It is one of those small, hopeful signs that this traumatized city may be awakening from the nightmare of Mexico’s drug wars: Armando Alanis once again feels safe enough to stop off for a late-night nosh at Tacos Los Quiques, a beloved sidewalk food cart.

“We couldn’t have done this two years ago,” Alanis, a 44-year-old poet, said recently as he chowed down on tacosgringas in the dim glow of inner-city streetlights. “It would be wrong not to recognize what we have regained.”

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In Mexico’s north, second mass shooting in a week leaves four dead

Monterrey-Nathaniel C. SheetzThe Washington Post, 9/26/2013

Four men were killed and five people seriously injured early Thursday at a bar outside the northern city of Monterrey when assailants burst in and opened fire on patrons, officials with the state government of Nuevo Leon said. The shooting in the Monterrey suburb of Santa Catarina comes a little more than three days after gunmen killed 10 people, including a young girl, at a party celebrating the victory of a baseball team near the border city of Ciudad Juarez, in the state of Chihuahua.

The killings are sure to unnerve security officials in the two northern states, as well as their federal counterparts in Mexico City. Earlier this month, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto cited Chihuahua and Nuevo Leon as success stories in his government’s effort to restore peace in the nation, noting that homicides had declined in those states by 37.2% and 46.5%, respectively, since he took office in December.

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Mexico Pursuing Vanished Victims of Its Drug Wars

Monterrey-Nathaniel C. SheetzThe New York Times, 6/22/2013

Rosa González cannot shake the memory of the state investigator who was too afraid of reprisals to take a full report, the police officer who shrugged when the ransom demand came, the months of agonizing doubt and, most of all, the final words from her daughter before she disappeared. “I am giving you a hug because I love you so much,” her mentally disabled daughter, Brizeida, 23, told Rosa hours before she was abducted with her 21-year-old cousin after a party more than two years ago.

In thousands upon thousands of cases, the story may well have ended there, adding to the vast number of Mexicans who have disappeared. Unlike those in other Latin American countries who were victims of repressive governments, many of Mexico’s disappeared are casualties of the organized-crime and drug violence that has convulsed this nation for years. But here in Nuevo León State, prosecutors, detectives, human rights workers and families are poring over cases together and in several instances cracking them, overcoming the thick walls of mistrust between civilians and the authorities to do the basic police work that is so often missing in this country, leaving countless crimes unsolved and unpunished.

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