‘A perfect piñata’: why disdain for Trump is a plus for Mexico’s government

06/23/16 The Guardian

DonaldTrumpPinataIn Mexico, Donald Trump has been mocked, vilified and – in piñata form – beaten to smithereens. He has inspired scorn, foreboding and a signature taco dish withlots of tongue, a little bit of brains and pig’s snout.

The presumptive Republican nominee’s comments on Mexican migrants, his threats to build a border wall and finance it with remittance payments have roused powerful emotions, not least bewilderment: the real estate mogul’s rise came as polls showed that Mexico’s historic anti-Americanism had started to diminish.

Trump appears to have changed that. “We used to view Americans as somehow distant, somehow weird, somehow unrelated to us, sometimes insensitive to what we think and do,” says Manuel Molano, deputy director of the Mexican Institute for Competitiveness, a thinktank. “But this is really something else.”

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Donald Trump’s Immigration Plan: Big Promises, Bigger Doubts

5/19/16 New York Times

Donald_Trump)Big promises are to be expected from presidential candidates, but reality often intrudes. The elder George Bush broke the “no new taxes” pledge that helped lead to his election. And Barack Obama’s administration has yet to live up to his prediction that his nomination would go down in history as the moment “when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal.”

Donald J. Trump’s vow to restore what he says is America’s lost luster, while perhaps not as flowery, comes with campaign promises that are equally grandiose. But Mr. Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee, has typically provided scant details on how he might make good on his promises — and ambitious ideas, even the concrete kind, do not always add up.

Central to Mr. Trump’s campaign, and to his national security strategy, is his intent to clamp down on illegal immigration, using a vast deportation “force” to relocate people to the other side of a wall, funded by Mexico, that would stretch nearly the length of the southern border.

Mr. Trump has suggested he will flesh out his ideas in a forthcoming speech. But experts across many fields who have analyzed his plans so far warn that they would come at astronomical costs — whoever paid — and would in many ways defy the logic of science, engineering and law.

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Apprehensions of Mexican migrants at U.S. borders reach near-historic low

4/14/2016 Pew Research Center

Pew_Research_Center_logoThe number of Mexican migrants apprehended at U.S. borders in fiscal 2015 dropped to the lowest levels in nearly 50 years, according to U.S. Border Patrol data. This change comes after a period in which net migration of Mexicans to the U.S. had fallen to lows not seen since the 1940s.

This decline in apprehensions coincides with recently released estimates by Mexico’s top statistical agency, which show that the rate at which Mexicans migrated to the U.S. and other countries – including both legal and unauthorized immigrants – has held steady for the past five years, after a dramatic drop during the Great Recession.

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The Border Walls Donald Trump Supports Have Led To Thousands Of Deaths In Arizona

3/23/16 International Business Times

8566728595_0d6365cce0_mRepublican White House hopeful Donald Trump stood in front of an outsize American flag Sunday in Fountain Hills, Arizona, and repeated a central promise of his presidential campaign that hits close to home in the Southwestern state.

“We’re going to build the wall, and we’re going to stop it. It’s going to end,” Trump said, referring to his stance on illegal immigration. “We’re going to have a big, beautiful wall.”

Trump has made building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico a cornerstone of his campaign, but his message on the stump fails to mention that existing barriers along the border in the Southwest have contributed to what activists have described as a growing humanitarian crisis. Fences erected in Texas, California and Arizona have led to the deaths of thousands of immigrants as vulnerable people have been pushed out into the inhospitable desert on their trek between the two countries even as the overall rate of illegal border crossing has dropped during the past eight years.

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A Visceral Portrait of Life at the U.S.-Mexico Border

3/15/16 The Atlantic

fence at borderIn this short documentary, filmmaker Rodrigo Reyes re-works material from his award-winning feature film, Purgatorio, into an ode to the squalid borderland between the United States and Mexico. Beautifully shot and at times difficult to watch, the film confronts viewers with the hardships of the real human beings that exist at the very center of the debate on immigration.

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How Mexican immigrants ended ‘separate but equal’ in California

3/2/2016 Los Angeles Times

In the coverage of the 2016 election cycle, you’ll hear this time and again: Latinos — immigrants and their families — are playing an important role in electing the next U.S. president. They are the largest minority group in the nation, and they are poised to make a major impact on American democracy.

It won’t be the first time. Seventy years ago, Mexican immigrants moved American civil rights forward, away from racial segregation toward integration and equality. It happened eight years before the Supreme Court began to dismantle segregation by handing down its decision in Brown vs. Board of Education in 1954.

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Deferred Action for Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: Analysis of DAPA’s Potential Effects on Families and Children

February 2016 Migration Policy Institute

In November 2014, the Obama administration announced the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program, which would protect from deportation and provide eligibility for work authorization to as many as 3.6 million unauthorized immigrants, according to MPI estimates. Unauthorized immigrants who are parents of U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents (LPRs) would qualify for deferred action for three years if they meet certain other requirements.

The Supreme Court in April 2016 is expected to hear arguments in the administration’s appeal of a lower court order blocking implementation of DAPA and a related expansion of the existing Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The justices’ decision in the case, which began when Texas and 25 other states challenged the president’s authority to create the DAPA program and expand DACA, is expected in June 2016. If the high court permits DAPA to go forward, the program has the potential to improve the incomes and living standards for many unauthorized immigrant families through protection from deportation and eligibility for work authorization.

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