With an unfriendly neighbour, Mexico needs to strengthen itself

The Economist 11/26/16 

us mex flagALMOST 25 years ago a Mexican president, Carlos Salinas, took a historic decision. He decreed that his country’s future lay in setting aside its fear and resentment of its mighty neighbour to the north and embracing economic integration with the United States through the North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The agreement underpinned the modernisation of part of Mexico’s economy. So the imminent arrival in the White House of Donald Trump, a critic of NAFTA who threatens to build a migrant-blocking wall between the two countries, looks like a disaster for Mexico.

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Can Oil Help Mexico Withstand Trump’s Attack on Trade? It’s Hard to See How

The New York Times 11/27/16

energy - oil pumpsCIUDAD DEL CARMEN, Mexico — The town that oil built is emptying out. “For Sale” signs are plastered on concrete-block houses and sun-bleached bungalows alike. The idled oil workers who used to cluster in the main square, hoping to pick up odd jobs, have moved on. Here in Ciudad del Carmen, on the gulf coast of Mexico, even the ironclad union positions are slipping away. Some roughnecks on the offshore rigs of the national oil company, Pemex, have not worked in months, and their voices are filled with anxiety. “What do you think is going to happen?” some ask.

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VIDEO | What Does the World Expect of President-elect Trump: Mexico

Director Duncan Wood discusses what Mexico expects of President-elect Donald Trump.

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3 ways Trump can slap tariffs on China and Mexico

11/14/16 CNN Money 

pesoPresident-elect Donald Trump has threatened to slap big tariffs on China and Mexico to help bring jobs back to America.

At first glance, it may seem hard to do without backing from Congress. But actually, Trump doesn’t even need Congress to approve it.

True, the Constitution gives Congress the right to impose tariffs on other nations. However, several complicated laws have been passed in the last 100 years that delegate that power from Congress to the president.

Trump has several options — each open to interpretation — but here are three key ways he can go after China and Mexico.

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‘Invisible’ Children: Raised in the U.S., Now Struggling in Mexico

11/13/16 NPR Ed

Student by flickr user RightIndexChildren and teenagers of Mexican descent make up one of the fastest-growing populations in the nation’s public schools.

That’s a well-known statistic, but less known is that, in the last eight years, nearly 500,000 of these children have returned to Mexico with their families. Nine out of 10 are U.S. citizens because they were born in the U.S. That’s according to Mexican and U.S. government figures compiled by researchers with the University of California system, and the Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

These families have returned to Mexico because of the economic downturn in the U.S. Many others were deported and had no choice but to take their U.S.-born children with them.

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Trump Trade Stance With Mexico Could Press Gas Prices

11/14/16 The Wall Street Journal 

energy - gas pumpDonald Trump’s presidency is widely viewed as a boon for the U.S. energy industry, but some of his planned policies could pose problems for the natural-gas business.

Mr. Trump has won plaudits from energy executives for saying he would peel back government regulations on oil companies, oppose global efforts to curb climate change and review a recent agreement that lifted sanctions on Iran, a major oil exporter.

Yet some of his other proposals could be detrimental to natural gas. He has pledged to tear up trade pacts and wall off Mexico, which could hurt the flow of U.S. natural gas to its southern neighbor. Mexico has become an increasingly important outlet for the fuel that has helped buoy domestic prices amid a glut of shale gas, analysts say.

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What a Trump Presidency Means for LatAm Organized Crime

11/10/16 InSight Crime

Donald_Trump_August_19,_2015_(cropped)In the wake of Donald Trump’s surprising victory in the US presidential election, InSight Crime considers the impact his administration could have on security and organized crime in Latin America.

Trump will hold the top office alongside a Republican-dominated Congress, as the party maintained a majority in both the Senate and House of Representatives.

Aside from his common refrain of building a wall along the US-Mexico border, Trump rarely touched on topics concerning Latin America during his campaign. This has created a great deal of uncertainty about his position on a host of issues related to the region, and his foreign policy more generally.

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