Morning Spin: Emanuel heads to Mexico City for climate summit

Chicago Tribune 12/1/2016

Mexico CityMayor Rahm Emanuel is in Mexico City today to take part in a climate change summit organized by the C40 group of global cities.

Emanuel departed Chicago on Wednesday afternoon with three staffers and is set to return midday Friday, according to city spokesman Grant Klinzman. The conference is paying the travel costs for Emanuel and one staff member, while the economic development agency World Business Chicago is paying for two other staff members, Klinzman said.

He said the conference will pay for Emanuel and Chief Sustainability Officer Chris Wheat, while World Business Chicago will pay for mayoral spokesman Adam Collins and Lisa Kohnke, the city’s director of strategic partnerships and global affairs. Klinzman said World Business Chicago would have specifics on the costs of their portion of the trip afterward.

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Giant Aluminum Stockpile Was Shipped From Mexico to Vietnam

Wall Street Journal 12/1/2016
sea tradeVUNG TAU, Vietnam—One of the world’s largest aluminum stockpiles, which until a few months ago was stored under hay and plastic tarp in a Mexican desert, has been moved to a remote port here in southern Vietnam.

Starting early this year, 500,000 metric tons of aluminum has been trucked out of the Mexican city of San José Iturbide and shipped to Vietnam, according to shipping records and people familiar with the matter. Much of it now sits under black tarps, guarded by baton-wielding men on motorcycles, at a factory and waterfront complex in this South China Sea port about a two-hour drive south of Ho Chi Minh City.

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Ambassador to Trump: ‘Mexico is not the enemy’

USA Today 12/1/2016

636161361992555645-x5r8263PHOENIX — If President-elect Donald Trump follows through with his campaign promise to build a border wall that Mexico will pay for, he can expect to run into a wall of his own: the Mexican government.

Mexico’s top diplomat to the U.S. says there is no way Mexico will pay for the wall. Not only that, a wall would send a “negative” message that would undermine years of economic and diplomatic cooperation between the two countries that contrary to public perception has benefited both countries.

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With an unfriendly neighbour, Mexico needs to strengthen itself

The Economist 11/26/16 

us mex flagALMOST 25 years ago a Mexican president, Carlos Salinas, took a historic decision. He decreed that his country’s future lay in setting aside its fear and resentment of its mighty neighbour to the north and embracing economic integration with the United States through the North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The agreement underpinned the modernisation of part of Mexico’s economy. So the imminent arrival in the White House of Donald Trump, a critic of NAFTA who threatens to build a migrant-blocking wall between the two countries, looks like a disaster for Mexico.

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Can Oil Help Mexico Withstand Trump’s Attack on Trade? It’s Hard to See How

The New York Times 11/27/16

energy - oil pumpsCIUDAD DEL CARMEN, Mexico — The town that oil built is emptying out. “For Sale” signs are plastered on concrete-block houses and sun-bleached bungalows alike. The idled oil workers who used to cluster in the main square, hoping to pick up odd jobs, have moved on. Here in Ciudad del Carmen, on the gulf coast of Mexico, even the ironclad union positions are slipping away. Some roughnecks on the offshore rigs of the national oil company, Pemex, have not worked in months, and their voices are filled with anxiety. “What do you think is going to happen?” some ask.

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VIDEO | What Does the World Expect of President-elect Trump: Mexico

Director Duncan Wood discusses what Mexico expects of President-elect Donald Trump.

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3 ways Trump can slap tariffs on China and Mexico

11/14/16 CNN Money 

pesoPresident-elect Donald Trump has threatened to slap big tariffs on China and Mexico to help bring jobs back to America.

At first glance, it may seem hard to do without backing from Congress. But actually, Trump doesn’t even need Congress to approve it.

True, the Constitution gives Congress the right to impose tariffs on other nations. However, several complicated laws have been passed in the last 100 years that delegate that power from Congress to the president.

Trump has several options — each open to interpretation — but here are three key ways he can go after China and Mexico.

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