Can Mexico cope with Trump?

12/7/2016 Foreign Policy 

Donald_Trump_August_19,_2015_(cropped)Donald Trump’s stunning electoral victory could very well transform the United States’ economic relations with the rest of the world. Perhaps the most dramatic changes will be felt by Mexico. During his election campaign, Trump proposed building a massive border wall, deporting millions of undocumented Mexican workers, renegotiating NAFTA, and imposing high tariffs of up to 35 percent on Mexican exports to the United States.

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‘Impunity has consequences’: the women lost to Mexico’s drug war

12/8/2016 The Guardian 

drug_war_02Lizbeth Amores dropped off her son at her mother’s house before heading to a house party with her friend Verenice Guevara. They were last seen at a bar popular with local gangsters.

The following night, María de Jesús Marthen was among a dozen or so young women invited to a private party at a ranch about an hour east of the city centre. On her way to the event, Marthen messaged her boyfriend, pleading for help.

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Mexico’s war on drugs: what has it achieved and how is the US involved?

12/8/2016 The Guardian 

drug warWhy did Mexico launch its war on drugs?

On 10 December 2006, the newly inaugurated president, Felipe Calderón, launched Mexico’s war on drugs by sending 6,500 troops into his home state of Michoacán, where rival cartels were engaged in tit-for-tat massacres as they battled over lucrative territory. The surge in violence had started in 2005, and a string of police and military operations by his predecessor Vicente Fox had failed to stem the bloodshed.

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Mexico and U.S. executives to share data to make case for free trade

12/8/2016 Reuters 

HE_Enrique_Peña_Nieto,_President_of_Mexico_(9085212846)Mexican and U.S. business leaders will share information on cross-border economic integration as they seek to build a case for free trade under the government of President-elect Donald Trump, a top industry group said on Wednesday.

Trump has threatened to renegotiate or withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), prompting concern in Mexico about the future of the economy, trade and foreign investment.

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Morning Spin: Emanuel heads to Mexico City for climate summit

Chicago Tribune 12/1/2016

Mexico CityMayor Rahm Emanuel is in Mexico City today to take part in a climate change summit organized by the C40 group of global cities.

Emanuel departed Chicago on Wednesday afternoon with three staffers and is set to return midday Friday, according to city spokesman Grant Klinzman. The conference is paying the travel costs for Emanuel and one staff member, while the economic development agency World Business Chicago is paying for two other staff members, Klinzman said.

He said the conference will pay for Emanuel and Chief Sustainability Officer Chris Wheat, while World Business Chicago will pay for mayoral spokesman Adam Collins and Lisa Kohnke, the city’s director of strategic partnerships and global affairs. Klinzman said World Business Chicago would have specifics on the costs of their portion of the trip afterward.

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Giant Aluminum Stockpile Was Shipped From Mexico to Vietnam

Wall Street Journal 12/1/2016
sea tradeVUNG TAU, Vietnam—One of the world’s largest aluminum stockpiles, which until a few months ago was stored under hay and plastic tarp in a Mexican desert, has been moved to a remote port here in southern Vietnam.

Starting early this year, 500,000 metric tons of aluminum has been trucked out of the Mexican city of San José Iturbide and shipped to Vietnam, according to shipping records and people familiar with the matter. Much of it now sits under black tarps, guarded by baton-wielding men on motorcycles, at a factory and waterfront complex in this South China Sea port about a two-hour drive south of Ho Chi Minh City.

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Ambassador to Trump: ‘Mexico is not the enemy’

USA Today 12/1/2016

636161361992555645-x5r8263PHOENIX — If President-elect Donald Trump follows through with his campaign promise to build a border wall that Mexico will pay for, he can expect to run into a wall of his own: the Mexican government.

Mexico’s top diplomat to the U.S. says there is no way Mexico will pay for the wall. Not only that, a wall would send a “negative” message that would undermine years of economic and diplomatic cooperation between the two countries that contrary to public perception has benefited both countries.

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