NEW PUBLICATION | Growing Together: How Trade with Mexico Impacts Employment in the United States

growing-together-employment-sectionBy Christopher Wilson

Read the essay

The United States and Mexico trade over a half-trillion dollars in goods and services each year, which amounts to more than a million dollars in bilateral commerce every minute.  With such a large volume of trade, it is not hard to believe that the number of jobs that depend on the bilateral relationship is similarly impressive. New research by the Mexico Institute shows precisely that: nearly five million U.S. jobs depend on trade with Mexico.

The study shows that if trade between the United States and Mexico were halted, 4.9 million Americans from across the country would be out of work.

This essay analyzes the employment impact of bilateral trade on the U.S. economy. Read the essay here.

Key Findings

  • Nearly five million U.S. jobs depend on trade with Mexico… Our model shows that if trade between the United States and Mexico were halted, 4.9 million Americans would be out of work.
  • Many times, it is the availability of cost-efficient inputs that allows U.S. companies to stay competitive enough to fend off competitors from outside the region and to grow exports in the face of fierce global competition. In this way, not just exports but also imports from Mexico help support jobs in U.S. industry.
  • The auto industry, which is probably the single most integrated regional industry, is a perfect example of the benefits of trade integration. Without the availability of nearby Mexican plants to do the final assembly of light vehicles, it is quite possible that the vast U.S. parts producing network for these vehicles would migrate to someplace outside of the continent.
  • Misperception and scapegoating has certainly played a role in creating the current negative political environment around trade…but so has the very real failure of U.S. policymakers to adequately address the challenges facing middle-class Americans.

This essay is part of our project Growing Together: Economic Ties between the United States and Mexico, which explores the bilateral relationship in detail to understand its nature and its impact on the United States. Throughout the fall of 2016, the Mexico Institute will release the findings of our research on our website and social media, using the hashtag #USMXEcon.

Read the essay

NEW PUBLICATION | Bilingual, Bicultural, Not Yet Binational: Undocumented Immigrant Youth in Mexico & the United States

jill-anderson-coverBy Jill Anderson

Read the publication

An entire generation of children, adolescents and young adults has been caught in the crucible of increasing criminalization of immigrants coupled with neoliberal globalization policies in Mexico and the United States. These are first- and second-generation immigrant youth who are bicultural, often bilingual, but rarely recognized as binational citizens in either of their countries. Since 2005, an estimated two million Mexicans have returned to Mexico after having lived in the United States, including over 500,000 U.S.-born children. As of 2005, the population of Mexican-origin immigrant youth in the United States (first- and second-generation) reached an estimated 6.9 million. They have come of age in conditions of extreme vulnerability due to their undocumented status or the undocumented status of their parents.

The challenges that immigrant youth face in the aftermath of deportation and return are varied. Emotional distress, post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression and alienation are commonly described as key factors during the first months to years of return. These young people have experienced family separation, a sense of alienation, and human rights violations during detention and deportation. Systemic and inter-personal discrimination against deportees and migrants among the non-migrant population in Mexico can make an already challenging situation more difficult. For some, an accent, a lack of language proficiency in Spanish, and/or tattoos make it difficult to “blend in,” find jobs, or continue their studies. In addition to emotional and socio-cultural stress, there are also facing systemic educational, employment and political barriers to local integration and stability.

This paper examines the phenomenon of binational immigrant youth and, in the interest of constructing a binational agenda that privileges the human security and socio-economic integration of immigrant youth in the United States and Mexico in the short- and long-term, proposes a list of binational public policy recommendations.

Read the publication

Mexico Institute Materials on Anti-Corruption Efforts

Security and the Rule of LawOn Monday, as President Enrique Peña Nieto signed into law a new anti-corruption system, he apologized for a damaging conflict of interest scandal in 2014 surrounding his wife’s purchase of a $7m luxury home from a government contractor, an episode that hurt the Mexican people’s faith in the presidency and the government. “For this reason, with all humility I ask your forgiveness,” he said. “I reiterate my sincere and profound apology for the offense and indignation I have caused you.”

In light of the ratification of the anti-corruption reform, I would like to share with you our recent work on anti-corruption efforts in Mexico.

Sincerely,

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute

Anti-Corruption

Mexico Wins: Anti-Corruption Reform Approved

Fighting Corruption in Mexico

Mexico Today: Analyzing the Country’s Reforms

Mexico’s Reforms and the Prospects for Growth

Mexican Civil Society’s Battle against Corruption: #Ley3de3

Mexico: The Fight Against Corruption

How to Make Mexico More Competitive: More Corporate Ethics & State Efficiency, Less Corruption

Mexico’s Battle Against Corruption

Mexico Corruption Perception Index 2015

Corruption, A Central Issue in the Campaigns

The Mexican State and Anti-Corruption Efforts

Additionally, check out our recent work on rule of law in Mexico.

The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

Book Launch | The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

Mexico and the United States: Combating Illicit Finance Together

Mexico Security Review 2016: Assessing the Outlook for the Rule of Law

A Mexican Utopia: Book Launch & Discussion of the Rule of Law in Mexico

A Mexican Utopia: The Rule of Law is Possible

A Way to Restore Mexico’s Trust Deficit

Four Rule of Law Policies to Make Mexico Grow

The Mexican State and Transparency

The State of Citizen Security in Mexico: 2014 in Review and the Year Ahead

EVENT FRIDAY – Book Launch | The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government

problem of powerWHEN: Friday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute invites you to a book launch and discussion on Mexico’s political system. Wilson Center Global Fellow Luis Rubio will present his book, The Problem of Power: Mexico Requires a New System of Government. After his presentation, leading analysts will discuss the system of governance and concentration of power in Mexico, as well as policy prescriptions to improve Mexico’s political system.

The Problem of Power is a reflection of the internal and external causes of the weakness of the Mexican political system, as well as an analysis of the opportunities to transform it. As stated in the introduction, the main message of the book is the need to build institutions and strengthen the rule of law based on due process so that government and the political sector in Mexico is more responsive to its citizens’ needs and aspirations and less focused on preserving the benefits inherent in the status quo. This implies a need for the transformation and professionalization of all three branches of government at all three levels, municipal, state and federal.

Download the book (available in both English and Spanish)

Speakers

Luis Rubio
Global Fellow & Advisory Board Member, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center
President, Centro de Investigación para el Desarrollo (CIDAC)

Verónica Ortiz-Ortega
Political Analyst, El Economista and Canal del Congreso

Oliver Azuara
Economics Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

New Publication: Lessons from the Development of Binational and Civil Society Cooperation on Water Management at the U.S.-Mexico Border

Anatomy of a RelationshipBy Carlos de la Parra and Carlos Heredia

Mexico and the United States are partners in a number of agreements that imply joint management of natural resources and have had a long and productive history of sharing water resources. The two countries share water resources in the Colorado and Tijuana river basins, and in the Rio Grande basin; the joint utilization of their waters is defined by the Treaty of February 3, 1944 and its Minutes.

The authors argue that -since ecosystems do not respect national boundaries- binational cooperation on cross-border environmental issues is a must. Environmental issues must be seen as an integral part of border affairs and border management. Economic, security and environmental issues are all interrelated and must be addressed as such. Further, the authors believe that civil society activism and inter-governmental cooperation have played mutually reinforcing roles in improving the way that the two countries manage natural resources and moving towards a truly regional approach in a binational context.

The essay analyzes binational and civil society cooperation on cross-border environmental issues, with a special focus on water management. The piece looks at binational water management from a holistic perspective, arguing that the growing involvement of civil society has improved policy outcomes.

The above text is an excerpt from the introduction to the essay. This essay is part five of our seriesThe Anatomy of a Relationship: A Collection of Essays on the Evolution of U.S.-Mexico Cooperation on Border Management.” We are releasing the essays individually throughout 2015 and will publish them together in early 2016. 

Read the essay here.

Mexico Institute: November Highlights

The Mexico Institute, November 2012

Each month, the Mexico Institute will review and highlight the month’s activities and feature them here.

Visitors will be able to watch the recap from our most recent events, browse our new publications, and read articles that feature key media appearances of the Mexico Institute staff. We hope you will find this review useful and informative. Enjoy!

Analysis

  • November 7th: “U.S.-Mexico Relations Under President Obama’s Second Term”

The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to share with you the following analysis on the implications of the 2012 U.S. Presidential Elections for the U.S.-Mexico Relationship. Select pieces offer an overview of U.S.-Mexico Relations, insights into the future of an Obama-Peña Nieto relationship, reflections on the continued positive trends in U.S.-Mexico Trade, and an analysis of the Latino Electorate and immigration in the 2012 elections. Each piece is available separately below or you can download the full PDF here.

U.S.-Mexico Relations Under President Obama’s Second Term– By Andrew D. Selee

Obama and Peña Nieto Under President Obama’s Second Term– By Duncan Wood

US-Mexico Trade Under President Obama’s Second Term– By Christopher E. Wilson

Immigration and the Latino Electorate Under President Obama’s Second Term– By Miguel R. Salazar

Continue reading “Mexico Institute: November Highlights”

Mexico Institute: October Highlights

The Mexico Institute, October 2012

Each month, the Mexico Institute will review and highlight the month’s activities and feature them here.

Visitors will be able to watch the recap from our most recent events, browse our new publications, and read articles that feature key media appearances of the Mexico Institute staff. We hope you will find this review useful and informative. Enjoy!

Continue reading “Mexico Institute: October Highlights”