UPCOMING EVENT | The Impact of Immigration Enforcement Policies on Teaching and Learning in America’s Public Schools

education2WHEN: Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 11:30am-1:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP


There has been considerable discussion in news outlets about the impact of immigration enforcement policies on children and families. Recent incidents across the country and reported in the press have raised alarm throughout immigrant communities. Clearly there is great fear in this hyper-sensitized environment. To what extent is this ramped up immigration enforcement impacting our nation’s public schools? How does it vary by region and what is the “collateral” fallout for non-immigrant students? How are educators reacting and to what extent is this affecting them? What rights do students have and what happens to U.S.-citizen children when they are sent to a country and school system they do not know? To address these questions, four new research papers will be presented with brief highlights. There will be ample time for Q&A and discussion. The studies include:

•         A new national survey of the impact of immigration enforcement on teaching and learning in the nation’s schools
•         The impact of immigration enforcement on educators
•         Federal and state policy affecting the children of immigrants and their schooling
•         What happens to U.S. citizen students caught up in deportation of family members


A light lunch will be served at 11:30am. The program will begin at 12:00pm.

Co-sponsored by:


Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Patricia Gándara, Co-Director, Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles, UCLA

Bryant Jensen, Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University

Shena Sanchez, Research Associate, University of California, Los Angeles

Julie Sugarman, Senior Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Institute

Lily Eskelsen Garcia, President, National Education Association

Claudio Sanchez, Education Correspondent, National Public Radio

Click to RSVP


UPCOMING EVENT | Los Zetas Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

9781477312742WHEN: Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 9:00-11:00 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center


Los Zetas where once Mexico’s most feared criminal organization dominating important smuggling routes from Central America into the United States. Their success was based in part on a business model that combined brute strength and predatory business practices. Join us for a discussion with the author of a new book, Los Zetas, Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico and a panel of experts on the nature of criminal enterprise and the challenges of controlling illicit economies.


Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Associate Professor at the Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University; Global Fellow, Wilson Center


Vanda Felbab Brown, Senior Fellow, Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, Foreign Policy Program, Brookings Institution

Steven Dudley, Co-director, InSight Crime

Nicholas Miroff, National Security Correspondent, The Washington Post


Eric L. Olson, Senior Adviser, Mexico Institute; Deputy Director, Latin American Program Wilson Center


UPCOMING EVENT | A Critical Juncture: Public Opinion and U.S.-Mexico Relations

USA and Mexico

WHEN: Thursday, January 18, 2018

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center


The Wilson Center and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs are pleased to invite you to an event on public opinion on U.S.-Mexico relations. Over the last two to three decades, public opinion in the bilateral relationship has risen and fallen, and U.S.-Mexico relations have hit a rough patch since the election of Donald Trump. Today, Mexican public opinion of the United States has fallen to a historic low; however, U.S. opinion of Mexico is quite strong and on the rise.

Join us as we discuss two reports on U.S.-Mexico public opinion. The first, A Critical Juncture: Public Opinion in U.S.-Mexico Relations, reviews U.S. and Mexican perceptions of their neighboring country, first looking at broad attitudes and then delving into important topics in the bilateral relationship. The second, a report by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, and Buendía & Laredo, For the First Time, A Majority of Mexicans Hold Unfavorable Views of United States, examines the phenomenon of declining Mexican public opinion of the United States, while American views of Mexico have become more favorable since all-time lows recorded in 2013. With NAFTA negotiations in the background, both Mexicans and Americans have come to believe that NAFTA has been beneficial to their countries.


Moderator: Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute

Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute

Dina Smeltz, Senior Fellow on Public Opinion and Foreign Policy, Chicago Council on Global Affairs

Esteban Guzmán Saucedo, Project Director, Buendía & Laredo



UPCOMING EVENT: AMLO, MORENA and the 2018 Mexico Elections

7242410256_9a32bc1771_oWHEN: Tuesday, September 5, 2017

WHERE: Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP

Never before has a Mexican presidential contender received as much international attention as former head of government of Mexico City and three-time candidate, Andrés Manuel López Obrador. With a campaign focused on criticisms of corruption and “neoliberal” policies under the previous three governments, López Obrador and his National Regeneration Movement (MORENA) party represent the Mexican left’s best shot at winning the presidency in recent history. He currently leads the polls in what is sure to be a close race between numerous candidates, to be decided in a single round in July, 2018.

The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and the Inter-American Dialogue are pleased to welcome López Obrador for an open and frank discussion of his policy proposals and his view on domestic and foreign challenges facing Mexico – including a complicated relationship with Washington.

 Organized by the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and the Inter-American Dialogue 

* Please note this event will be conducted in Spanish. Simultaneous interpretation equipment will be provided on a first-come first-serve basis.



Duncan Wood,
Director, Mexico Institute


Michael Shifter
President, Inter-American Dialogue


Andrés Manuel López Obrador
President, Movement for National Renewal (MORENA)

Click to RSVP

[VIDEO] Dying for a Story: How Impunity & Violence against Mexican Journalists are Weakening the Country

Watch the video from yesterday’s event

Mexico has faced significant threats and violence from organized crime over the last decade. The human toll and tragedy of this violence is directly impacting journalists as well, leading to self-censorship, under-reporting of organized crime, and the corruption and state complicity that comes with it. Journalists have been killed, injured, and threatened as they seek to investigate and report on what is happening, and dozens of media outlets have been forced to close in the last few years. According to Article 19, eleven journalists were killed in 2016 and six so far in 2017 including Javier Valdéz, an internationally recognized journalist from Sinaloa’s RíoDoce, on May 15th.

In 2012, the United States supported the legislative framework that established Mexico’s National Mechanism for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders and Journalists. Through USAID, the United States has continued to support the Protection Mechanism and other programs to benefit journalists and defenders in Mexico. Nevertheless, the recent cases demonstrate that these mechanisms have not yet been effective. The Mexican government has expressed concern about the problem and promised justice, but investigations and prosecutions of those responsible have been very few. In the process, freedom of information, freedom of the press, the rule of law, and democratic governance have been weakened.

The Wilson Center and WOLA convened a discussion with experts and courageous Mexican journalists to hear about their work and the difficulties and risks they and their colleagues face. They were joined by Ana Cristina Ruelas, the Director of Article 19’s office for Mexico and Central America, Azam Ahmed, the New York Times’ Bureau Chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, and Jennifer Clement, the President of PEN International, who presented an overview of attacks and aggressions against journalists in Mexico and the Mexican government’s response to this concerning situation.

Fourth Annual “Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border” Conference

A truck of the Mexican company Olympics bearing Mexican and U.S. flags approaches the border crossing into the U.S., in LaredoWHEN: Wednesday, June 14, 2017

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and the Border Trade Alliance are pleased to invite you to our fourth annual high-level “Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border” conference, which will focus on improving border management in order to strengthen the competitiveness of both the United States and Mexico. Specific emphasis will be put on a cooperative bilateral framework, border and transportation infrastructure, binational economic development, and the need for efforts that simultaneously support security and efficiency in border management.


Confirmed Speakers*

Governor Doug Ducey, Governor of the State of Arizona

Senator John Cornyn, Texas Majority Whip and Charmain, Subcomittee on International Trade, Customs, and Global Competitiveness

Commissioner (Acting) Kevin McAleenan, U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Congressman Henry Cuellar, (TX- 28)

Alan Bersin, Global Fellow, Wilson Center & Former Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Russell Jones, Chairman, Border Trade Alliance

Michael C. Camuñez, President & CEO, ManattJones Global Strategies & Former Assistant Secretary of Commerce, International Trade Administration

Carlos Marin, CEO, Ambiotec Group, Board Member, United Brownsville

Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute

Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute

* A detailed agenda and additional speakers will be added 

Click to RSVP

  Thanks to Our Partners 




UPCOMING EVENT | The State of Security in Mexico

security_lockWHEN: Friday, February 3, 8:45am-1:00pm

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP

Homicides appear to have increased significantly in parts of Mexico during 2016. By one calculation, organized crime related homicides increased roughly 49 percent between 2015 and 2016. October was the most violent month in nearly four years, and after two years of decline, 2016 roughly matched the homicide rate for 2013. Moreover, major cities like Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez that had experienced a decrease in homocides since 2012 saw a significant uptick. What is driving this troubling tren and what kinds of innovative programs are being implemented to reduce violence or prevent it altogether? Please join our panel of experts for a discussion about these and other questions.


Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

The Current State of U.S. Mexico Security Cooperation and Future Prospects 

Eric L. Olson, Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute for Security Policy and Associate Director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program

Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Panel I: What is Driving the Increase in Homicides in Mexico

Moderator: Clare Seelke, Specialist in Latin American Affairs, Congressional Research Service

Overview: David Shirk, Professor & Director, Justice in Mexico Project, University of San Diego

The Case of Tijuana: Octavio Rodriguez, Program Coordinator, Justice in Mexico Project, University of San Diego

The Case of Tamaulipas: Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Associate Professor, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley & Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center

The Case of Ciudad Juarez: Alfredo Corchado, Journalist

The Case of Guerrero, Chris Kyle, Professor of Anthropology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Panel II: Promising Experiences in Violence Reduction

Moderator: Eric L. Olson, Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute for Security Policy and Associate Director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program

Is violence reduction possible?  What’s the evidence? : Enrique Betancourt, Director of Violence and Crime Prevention Initiative, Chemonics International

A Public Health Approach to Reducing Violence: Brent Decker, Chief Program Officer, Cure Violence

Building Community Resilience Through Investing in Young Leaders: Carlos Cruz, Founder, Cauce Ciudadano, A.C

Reintegration of Young People in Conflict with the Law: Mercedes Castañeda Gomez Mont,  Director of Youth Program & Co-Founder, Reinserta Un Mexicano, A.C

Click to RSVP