UPCOMING EVENT: AMLO, MORENA and the 2018 Mexico Elections

7242410256_9a32bc1771_oWHEN: Tuesday, September 5, 2017

WHERE: Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP

Never before has a Mexican presidential contender received as much international attention as former head of government of Mexico City and three-time candidate, Andrés Manuel López Obrador. With a campaign focused on criticisms of corruption and “neoliberal” policies under the previous three governments, López Obrador and his National Regeneration Movement (MORENA) party represent the Mexican left’s best shot at winning the presidency in recent history. He currently leads the polls in what is sure to be a close race between numerous candidates, to be decided in a single round in July, 2018.

The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and the Inter-American Dialogue are pleased to welcome López Obrador for an open and frank discussion of his policy proposals and his view on domestic and foreign challenges facing Mexico – including a complicated relationship with Washington.

 Organized by the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and the Inter-American Dialogue 

* Please note this event will be conducted in Spanish. Simultaneous interpretation equipment will be provided on a first-come first-serve basis.

Speakers

Introduction

Duncan Wood,
Director, Mexico Institute

Moderator

Michael Shifter
President, Inter-American Dialogue

Panelist

Andrés Manuel López Obrador
President, Movement for National Renewal (MORENA)

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[VIDEO] Dying for a Story: How Impunity & Violence against Mexican Journalists are Weakening the Country

Watch the video from yesterday’s event

Mexico has faced significant threats and violence from organized crime over the last decade. The human toll and tragedy of this violence is directly impacting journalists as well, leading to self-censorship, under-reporting of organized crime, and the corruption and state complicity that comes with it. Journalists have been killed, injured, and threatened as they seek to investigate and report on what is happening, and dozens of media outlets have been forced to close in the last few years. According to Article 19, eleven journalists were killed in 2016 and six so far in 2017 including Javier Valdéz, an internationally recognized journalist from Sinaloa’s RíoDoce, on May 15th.

In 2012, the United States supported the legislative framework that established Mexico’s National Mechanism for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders and Journalists. Through USAID, the United States has continued to support the Protection Mechanism and other programs to benefit journalists and defenders in Mexico. Nevertheless, the recent cases demonstrate that these mechanisms have not yet been effective. The Mexican government has expressed concern about the problem and promised justice, but investigations and prosecutions of those responsible have been very few. In the process, freedom of information, freedom of the press, the rule of law, and democratic governance have been weakened.

The Wilson Center and WOLA convened a discussion with experts and courageous Mexican journalists to hear about their work and the difficulties and risks they and their colleagues face. They were joined by Ana Cristina Ruelas, the Director of Article 19’s office for Mexico and Central America, Azam Ahmed, the New York Times’ Bureau Chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, and Jennifer Clement, the President of PEN International, who presented an overview of attacks and aggressions against journalists in Mexico and the Mexican government’s response to this concerning situation.

Fourth Annual “Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border” Conference

A truck of the Mexican company Olympics bearing Mexican and U.S. flags approaches the border crossing into the U.S., in LaredoWHEN: Wednesday, June 14, 2017

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and the Border Trade Alliance are pleased to invite you to our fourth annual high-level “Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border” conference, which will focus on improving border management in order to strengthen the competitiveness of both the United States and Mexico. Specific emphasis will be put on a cooperative bilateral framework, border and transportation infrastructure, binational economic development, and the need for efforts that simultaneously support security and efficiency in border management.

      

Confirmed Speakers*

Governor Doug Ducey, Governor of the State of Arizona

Senator John Cornyn, Texas Majority Whip and Charmain, Subcomittee on International Trade, Customs, and Global Competitiveness

Commissioner (Acting) Kevin McAleenan, U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Congressman Henry Cuellar, (TX- 28)

Alan Bersin, Global Fellow, Wilson Center & Former Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Russell Jones, Chairman, Border Trade Alliance

Michael C. Camuñez, President & CEO, ManattJones Global Strategies & Former Assistant Secretary of Commerce, International Trade Administration

Carlos Marin, CEO, Ambiotec Group, Board Member, United Brownsville

Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute

Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute

* A detailed agenda and additional speakers will be added 

Click to RSVP

  Thanks to Our Partners 

 


  

 

UPCOMING EVENT | The State of Security in Mexico

security_lockWHEN: Friday, February 3, 8:45am-1:00pm

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP

Homicides appear to have increased significantly in parts of Mexico during 2016. By one calculation, organized crime related homicides increased roughly 49 percent between 2015 and 2016. October was the most violent month in nearly four years, and after two years of decline, 2016 roughly matched the homicide rate for 2013. Moreover, major cities like Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez that had experienced a decrease in homocides since 2012 saw a significant uptick. What is driving this troubling tren and what kinds of innovative programs are being implemented to reduce violence or prevent it altogether? Please join our panel of experts for a discussion about these and other questions.

Welcome

Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

The Current State of U.S. Mexico Security Cooperation and Future Prospects 

Eric L. Olson, Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute for Security Policy and Associate Director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program

Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Panel I: What is Driving the Increase in Homicides in Mexico

Moderator: Clare Seelke, Specialist in Latin American Affairs, Congressional Research Service

Overview: David Shirk, Professor & Director, Justice in Mexico Project, University of San Diego

The Case of Tijuana: Octavio Rodriguez, Program Coordinator, Justice in Mexico Project, University of San Diego

The Case of Tamaulipas: Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Associate Professor, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley & Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center

The Case of Ciudad Juarez: Alfredo Corchado, Journalist

The Case of Guerrero, Chris Kyle, Professor of Anthropology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Panel II: Promising Experiences in Violence Reduction

Moderator: Eric L. Olson, Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute for Security Policy and Associate Director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program

Is violence reduction possible?  What’s the evidence? : Enrique Betancourt, Director of Violence and Crime Prevention Initiative, Chemonics International

A Public Health Approach to Reducing Violence: Brent Decker, Chief Program Officer, Cure Violence

Building Community Resilience Through Investing in Young Leaders: Carlos Cruz, Founder, Cauce Ciudadano, A.C

Reintegration of Young People in Conflict with the Law: Mercedes Castañeda Gomez Mont,  Director of Youth Program & Co-Founder, Reinserta Un Mexicano, A.C

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EVENT ON MONDAY | The State of Mexico’s Economy

mexican pesosWHEN: Monday, January 9, 1:30-3:00pm

WHERE: 6th Floor Board Room, Wilson Center, Washington, DC

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The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to an event with the International Monetary Fund’s Mexico team, who will present the conclusions of the recently-completed 2016 Article IV consultation with Mexico.

Mexico’s economy has been growing at a moderate pace, inflation is low, and the unemployment rate has been declining. Fiscal consolidation has begun and the financial system remains strong and resilient to severe shocks. It would be critical to adhere to the planned fiscal consolidation to put the public debt ratio on a downward path, and take steps to strengthen the commitment framework for fiscal policy. Steadfast implementation of the plan to reform PEMEX and strengthen its financial viability is also important. Future monetary policy decisions should continue to be guided by the objective of keeping inflation expectations anchored, while clear communication by the central bank is critical. The exchange rate should continue to act as the key shock absorber to help the economy adjust to external shocks. Significant progress has been achieved in strengthening financial sector prudential oversight but some gaps remain, especially in the governance framework of CNBV and IPAB. On the structural front, strengthening the rule of law and boosting female labor supply would boost potential output and reduce inequality and poverty. Going forward, Mexico will need to navigate an uncertain and complex external environment, with elevated risks of protectionism and heightened global financial market volatility.

Speakers

Robert Rennhack
Deputy Director, Western Hemisphere Department, IMF

Costas Christou
Advisor, Western Hemisphere Department, IMF

Alex Klemm
Senior Economist, Western Hemisphere Department, IMF

Damien Puy
Economist,Western Hemisphere Department, IMF

Fabian Valencia
Senior Economist, Western Hemisphere Department, IMF

Commentator

Christopher Wilson
Deputy Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

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WEBCAST TOMORROW: What Does the World Expect of President-elect Donald Trump?

white_house_1500.jpgWHEN: November 15, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Watch via Webcast

Watch the live webcast on TwitterFacebook, or on wilsoncenter.org. Tweet the panel your questions @TheWilsonCenter or post them on our Facebook page during the event.

The next U.S. Administration faces  a complicated, volatile world.

Join us for spirited conversation about the foreign policy expectations and challenges confronting the next President of the United States with distinguished Wilson Center experts on Mexico, Russia, China, the Middle East, Latin America and more.

Introduction

The Honorable Jane Harman
Director, President and CEO, Wilson Center

Speakers

Cynthia J. Arnson
Director, Latin American Program, Wilson Center

Robert Daly
Director, Kissinger Institute on China and the United States, Wilson Center

Robert S. Litwak
Director, International Security Studies, Wilson Center

Aaron David Miller
Distinguished Fellow, Middle East, Wilson Center

Matthew Rojansky
Director, Kennan Institute, Wilson Center

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Watch via Webcast

 

EVENT TOMORROW | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tomorrow, September 27, 2:00-4:00pm

WHERE: Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP.

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP