The Next Generation of Criminal Groups Driving Violence in Mexico

08/13/2021

Source: InSight Crime

Mexico’s process of criminal fragmentation has been a slow burn. Many of the country’s mightiest criminal groups have been unable to stay united due to internal strife, incursions from rivals or the arrests and killings of key leaders.

But while some powerhouses like the Sinaloa Cartel and Jalisco Cartel New Generation (Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generación – CJNG) remain intact, smaller, hyper-violent and localized groups have become real national security threats. Many are splinters of old cartel structures, maintaining previous allegiances, while others were once dedicated oil thieves or drug transporters who gradually leveled up.

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UPCOMING EVENT | Los Zetas Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

9781477312742WHEN: Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 9:00-11:00 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center

RSVP

Los Zetas where once Mexico’s most feared criminal organization dominating important smuggling routes from Central America into the United States. Their success was based in part on a business model that combined brute strength and predatory business practices. Join us for a discussion with the author of a new book, Los Zetas, Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico and a panel of experts on the nature of criminal enterprise and the challenges of controlling illicit economies.

Author

Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Associate Professor at the Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University; Global Fellow, Wilson Center

Commentators

Vanda Felbab Brown, Senior Fellow, Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, Foreign Policy Program, Brookings Institution

Steven Dudley, Co-director, InSight Crime

Nicholas Miroff, National Security Correspondent, The Washington Post

Moderator

Eric L. Olson, Senior Adviser, Mexico Institute; Deputy Director, Latin American Program Wilson Center

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Monterrey prison: Employees are arrested after deadliest drug gang riot in Mexico’s history

2/19/16 International Business Times

MEXICO-CRIME-PRISON-RIOT
Relatives of inmates gather outside the Topo Chico prison in Monterrey, Mexico 

Mexican authorities have detained employees of the old and overcrowded Topo Chico prison in Monterrey, following the 11 February riot which resulted in the deaths of 52 people. Roberto Flores, the state prosecutor in Nuevo Leon has since accused prison director Gregoria Salazar, prison guard Jose Reyes Hernandez and the deputy superintendent Jesus Fernando Dominguez of homicide and abuse of authority and has placed them preventive custody.

The riot happened after fighting broke out between supporters of a gang leader Juan Pedro Saldivar-Farías known as Zeta 27, who have effectively taken control of the prison, and Jorge Iván Hernández, “El Credo”, a leader of another group, Gulf Cartel. It was not immediately clear how the victims died with reports stating that there was no gunfire.

The prison has long housed members of Zeta 27, who have spread fear across Mexico before being debilitated by arrests and the deaths of their founding members. The gang was also linked to another prison murder in Nuevo Leon in 2012, when 44 inmates died after Zeta members plotted with guards to stage an elaborate escape.

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Prosecutors Say Gunmen Kidnapped Reporter in Southern Mexico

2/08/16 The Associated Press

Palacio_de_Gobierno_del_Estado_de_Veracruz_04MEXICO CITY — A reporter was dragged from her home by armed assailants before dawn Monday in southern Mexico and had not been seen since, authorities said.

Crime-beat reporter Anabel Flores Salazar was kidnapped in the Gulf coast state of Veracruz at about 2 a.m.

The Veracruz state prosecutor’s office said police were looking for her. The kidnapping took place near the city of Orizaba, where she worked for a local newspaper.

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LOS ZETAS CARTEL KIDNAPS MEXICAN TEEN BASEBALL TEAM FOR RANSOM, FAMILY PAYS UP

7/5/15 Breitbart

drug_violence_mexico1A group of athletes from this border city were kidnapped by an armed commando. The victims included two teenagers, a coach, and a parent. The kidnapping occurred as the group tried to drive to the Telmex National Baseball Tournament in the Mexican city of Queretaro.

The group had been driving on June 28 and was stopped by a group of cartel gunmen near the town of Jaumave in the southern part of Tamaulipas, an area under the control of Los Zetas.

The teenagers played with the Niños Heroes and Trevino Kelly baseball leagues in this border city.

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5 Zetas cartel members arrested in northern Mexico

Fox News Latino, 3/17/2015

handcuffsFive suspected members of the Los Zetas drug cartel were arrested in separate operations in the northern Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, federal officials said.

Daniel Menera Sierra, suspected of being a regional leader of the drug cartel, and three associates were arrested in the city of San Pedro Garza Garcia, National Security Commissioner Monte Alejandro Rubido said in a statement.

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Zetas Leader Is Arrested in Mexico

By Randal C. Archibald, New York Times, 2/4/2015

hands in handcuffsMEXICO CITY — The leader of the Zetas — a Mexican criminal group notorious for its brutal murders — was arrested Wednesday without a shot fired in northern Mexico, as the authorities toppled yet another kingpin in a long and aggressive campaign against the group.

Federal police officers and soldiers swooped in on the leader, Omar Treviño Morales, known as Z-42 in the group’s militaristic system of code names, in San Pedro Garza García, an affluent suburb of Monterrey, Mexico, a business and industrial hub.

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Mexico Arrests Zetas Cartel Leader Omar Trevino Morales

handcuffs3/4/2015 BBC News

Omar Trevino Morales, leader of the notorious Zetas drugs cartel in Mexico, has been captured by security forces.

He was arrested in the early hours of Wednesday in the city of Monterrey in the northern state of Nuevo Leon, police said.

He is believed to have run the Zetas cartel since the capture of his brother, Miguel Angel, in 2013.

The arrest comes days after Mexican police captured another suspected drug lord, Servando “La Tuta” Gomez.

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Mexico Drug War: “Government Leaders Are Gravediggers for Bad News” – Sergio Aguayo

07/16/14 Reforma: Sergio Aguayo – Translated by Mexico Voices

drug warIt is the war’s worst slaughter. In Coahuila in 2011 Los Zetas disappeared 400 people. The PRI [Party of the Institutional Revolution, Peña Nieto’s party] state government investigated but, instead of reporting it, passed the information to the Attorney General’s Office (PGR) of Marisela Morales and Felipe Calderón, who secretly buried it.

In the municipality of Allende, two young men from wealthy families and prestigious private universities–José Luis Garza Gaytán and Héctor Moreno Villanueva–worked for Los Zetas; one day they ran away to the United States with five million dollars [sic] and a notebook containing compromising information. Drug boss Zeta-40 spoke clearly: if the fugitives didn’t return the money and notebook, Los Zetas would kill their families. They didn’t respond, and the Zetas occupied Allende (March 2011); then, aided by police in the municipality governed by the PAN [National Action Party of President Calderón], they snatched [disappeared] about 300 men and women, elderly and children, relatives and employees; they took the opportunity to kill 100 of them.

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Mexico’s Cartel-Fighting Vigilantes Get Closer to Texas Border

07/09/14 NBC News

machine gunThe gunmen nabbed watermelon farmer Jesus Manuel Guerrero as he drove from his ranch to buy supplies and held him for five painful days in the trunk of a car.

When family members finally paid a $120,000 ransom and they released him, he was urinating blood.

He’s just one of hundreds of victims of a wave of kidnapping that’s swept this once peaceful farming town, about 130 miles south of Texas.

But almost three years after his brutal abduction, Guerrero, who is now the mayor, says his town has become safer, the kidnappers scared to enter.

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