Latinos in the 2016 Election: State Fact Sheets

Pew Research Center

Pew_Research_Center_logoThe state fact sheets contain data on the size and social and economic characteristics of the Hispanic and non-Hispanic eligible voter populations. 
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The state fact sheets below contain data on the size and social and economic characteristics of the Hispanic and non-Hispanic eligible voter populations. These fact sheets are based on Pew Research Center’s tabulations of the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Eligible voters are defined as U.S. citizens ages 18 and older.

Border apprehensions, views of immigrants, 10 demographic trends

pew hispanic trends

April 15, 2016

Apprehensions of Mexican migrants at U.S. borders reach near-historic low

The number of Mexican migrants apprehended at U.S. borders in fiscal 2015 dropped to the lowest levels in nearly 50 years. This change comes after a period in which net migration of Mexicans to the U.S. had fallen to lows not seen since the 1940s. READ MORE >

Americans’ views of immigrants marked by widening partisan, generational divides

Republicans and Democrats continue to disagree deeply over immigration policies, including how to deal with undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. and whether to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Underlying these differences is a substantial – and growing – partisan divide over whether immigrants generally are a strength or burden on the country. READ MORE >

10 demographic trends that are shaping the U.S. and the world

Americans are more racially and ethnically diverse than in the past, and the U.S. is projected to be even more diverse in the coming decades. These demographic changes are shifting the electorate – and American politics. The 2016 electorate will be the most diverse in U.S. history due to strong growth among Hispanic eligible voters, particularly U.S.-born youth.
Demographic research: From multiracial children to gender identity, what demographers are studying now

Latinos in the 2016 Election: State Fact Sheets

The state fact sheets contain data on the size and social and economic characteristics of the Hispanic and non-Hispanic eligible voter populations. READ MORE >

April 19 primary: New York
April 19 primary: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island

President Obama says he wants ‘immigration reform done this year,’ but says he can’t stop deportations of non-criminal immigrants

ObamaNY Daily News, 2/2/14

“After almost two million deportations, President Obama’s enforcement machine has caused untold damage and suffering for families in New York and beyond,” Valdés added. “He signaled his willingness to advance an agenda with his executive powers, and we call on him to immediately suspend deportations and keep immigrant families together.” Yet although Obama in his speech asserted his willingness to use his executive powers on a number of issues, and even announced an Executive Order to raise the minimum wage for federal contractors to $10.10 per hour during his address, halting the deportation of non-criminal immigrants was not one of them.

The President’s inaction — his callousness, some would say — on this painful issue has cost him dearly in terms of support from Latino voters, 71% of whom voted to re-elect him. According to a Gallup poll, Obama’s approval rating among Latinos is in free fall, plummeting 23 points, from 75% in December 2012 to 52% in November 2013. Such a drop in support is only natural and is bound to get worse as long as Obama keeps up his cruel policy of massive deportations.

Lessons on Immigration in Two Governors’ Race

REPUBLICAN PARTY ELEPHANTThe New York Times, 11/06/2013

Republicans in Congress studying the results from the governors’ elections in New Jersey and Virginia on Tuesday see two starkly different test cases for how the party should move on immigration.
In New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie was boosted to a blowout victory by more than 20 points in part because he won half of Latino voters, while his democratic rival, State Senator Barbara Buono, won 46% of those voters. According to exit polls, Mr. Christie improved his standing among Latinos by 18 percentage points over his first run for governor in 2009.

Mexico Institute Event: The Decisive Vote? How Latinos voted and what it means for policy

Join the Mexico Institute for a discussion on the importance of the Latino vote and how it played out on the November 6 elections. Who voted, where and what difference did they make? What happened in a key battleground states? And what are the likely consequences for immigration reform and other policy issues?

Date: Dec. 10th // 9am to 11am // at the Woodrow Wilson Center

For more information and to RSVP visit the event page, The Decisive Vote?

Julian Castro: Latinos Could Give Dems Boost in Texas in Coming Years

National Journal, 11/08/2012

With the growing number of Latino voters, San Antonio Mayor and rising Democratic star Julian Castro said Texas will be competitive for Democrats in the next six to eight years.

Latinos have given Democrats a boost in several Western states in recent years, as President Obama secured victories in New Mexico, Nevada and Colorado in the 2008 and 2012 elections. With the Latino population growing in the Lone Star state, Democratic candidates could benefit in statewide elections, Castro said.

Read more…

Latino Voters in the 2012 Election

Pew Hispanic Center, 11/07/2012

Latinos voted for President Barack Obama over Republican Mitt Romney by 71% to 27%, according to an analysis of exit polls by the Pew Hispanic Center, a Project of the Pew Research Center.

Obama’s national vote share among Hispanic voters is the highest seen by a Democratic candidate since 1996, when President Bill Clinton won 72% of the Hispanic vote.

The Center’s analysis finds that Latinos made up 10% of the electorate, as indicated by the national exit poll, up from 9% in 2008 and 8% in 2004.

Read more…

Full report here, 2012Latino Vote Exit Poll Analysis