Parts with passports: how free trade drives GM’s engines

automobile car drive grass
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11/18/19 – Reuters

By Nick Carey

Long before the pistons for General Motors Co V-6 engines reach the U.S. No. 1 automaker’s Romulus, Michigan plant, they are seasoned international travelers.

Powdered aluminum from Tennessee is shipped to Pennsylvania and forged at high temperatures into connecting rods for the pistons, which are then sent to Canada to be shaped and polished. They are then shipped to Mexico for sub-assembly and finally the finished pistons are loaded onto trucks bound for Romulus to become part of a GM V-6 engine.

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Pelosi: U.S. House close to approving trade deal with Mexico, Canada

pelosi

10/31/19 – Reuters

By Patricia Zengerle and Makini Brice, Lisa Lambert

The U.S. House of Representatives is still working toward approving a trade agreement President Donald Trump worked out with Canada and Mexico, Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Thursday.

The House is on a “path to yes”, Pelosi said about ratifying the agreement, which was signed nearly a year ago, adding that her chamber’s inquiry into whether Trump should be impeached has “nothing to do” with its work on the agreement.

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Record Year at Pharr Bridge

 

white volvo semi truck on side of road
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10/21/19 – The Monitor

By Mitchell Ferman

The lines at the bridge lasted more than 10 hours at times. “It was bad,” Martin Arteaga said in early April, after crossing a load of bell peppers over the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge in his truck from Mexico.

It was the beginning of a slog of a spring at the Pharr bridge, when trucks and passenger vehicles sat on the 3.2-mile span in jammed lines that President Donald Trump threatened to close at the border in late March. Not long after, hundreds of U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers were reassigned from ports of entry to assist Border Patrol agents with immigration duties.

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U.S., Mexico, Canada are worlds apart for dairy farmers; here are the major differences and how the dairy industry works in each country

close up photo of cow
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10/18/19 – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

By Rick Barrett

Wisconsin farmers are not alone in facing the dairy crisis. But farmers in Canada and Mexico — the nation’s two largest dairy trading partners — are experiencing global trade forces differently.

Operating in a protected system, dairy farmers in Canada benefit from stable milk prices. Those in Mexico, though, have struggled amid a wave of imports from the U.S. Here’s a look at the diary industry in the three countries.

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Trump election rhetoric could send Mexican peso down almost 9% to 21.30 per dollar -Banorte

 

peso10/09/19 – Reuters

By Noe Torres

The Mexican peso could fall almost 9% to 21.30 per dollar next year if U.S. President Donald Trump again threatens the country during his re-election campaign, Mexican financial group Banorte said on Tuesday.

Trump has repeatedly sent the Mexican currency and stock market tumbling after attacking Mexico over immigration and trade, mostly on Twitter, threatening to impose tariffs on Mexican goods or close the countries’ shared border.

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Mexico may be an unexpected winner of the US-China trade war

birds eye view photo of freight containers
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09/12/19 – CNBC

By Grace Shao

China and the United States are disrupting trade in much of the world with their trade war — but Mexico may be a winner.

Despite fresh hopes among investors for a peaceful conclusion, the trade conflict that began between the world’s two biggest economies more than a year ago shows no substantive signs of ending.

But amid all the chaos, Mexico is coming out on top, said John Murphy, senior vice president for international policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Mexico, he said, has been able to build on its emergence as a manufacturing hub “with free-trade agreements that offer guaranteed access to more than 50 foreign countries.”

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Mexico’s point man in New Mexico

07/08/16 Alburquerque Journal

NewMexicoYou see it all the time in the movies. Americans traveling outside the county are fleeing danger or persecution. If they can just make it to the U.S. Embassy, they’ll be OK.

Well, there’s a similar place of sanctuary in the heart of Albuquerque for travelers from Mexico.

The Mexican Consulate on Fourth Street half a mile south of I-40 is one of 50 in the United States. It’s a small version of the Mexican Embassy in Washington, D.C., and its mission is to assist and protect Mexican citizens and boost trade and friendship between the two countries.

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US-Mexico border no barrier to supply chain links

Financial Times, 12/2/2013

Photo by Flikr user Rockin RobinIt would be easy looking at the border between San Diego, in the US state of California, and Tijuana, in the Mexican state of Baja California, to conclude that the formidable fence was a barrier to all cross-border interactions. The fence and other defences against unauthorised border crossings have only grown since the September 11 2001 attacks on the United States sharply increased concerns about the US’s border security.

Yet it is a tribute to the power of the North American Free Trade Agreement that companies have continued in the years since 2001 to move goods freely across the heavily policed frontier.

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Children cross Mexican border to receive a U.S. education

The Washington Post, 9/23/2013

education2The children file into the U.S. port of entry, chatting in Spanish as they pull U.S. birth certificates covered in protective plastic from Barbie and SpongeBob backpacks. Armed U.S. border officers wave them onto American soil and the yellow buses waiting to take them to school in Luna County, N.M. This is the daily ritual of the American schoolchildren of Palomas, Mexico, a phenomenon that dates back six decades and has helped blur the international border here.

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Mexico sends jobs to the US, not just workers

bimboMSN Now, 5/15/2013

Mexico outsourcing jobs to America? No, it’s not a headline from The Onion, it’s really happening. Mexican baking company Groupo Bimbo’s Mexico City factory was completely overwhelmed by American appetites for its tasty treats, especially among the fast-growing Hispanic population, who are hungry for the taste of home. But instead of opening another Mexico-based kitchen, it headed across the border to set up shop. So far the baked goods behemoth has opened 80 plants in the U.S., hiring around 40,000 American workers to make everything from Bimbo Panque con Nuez (Pecan Pound Cake) to Barcel Takis Guacamole. So much for those authentic Mexican-made guacamole-flavored tortilla chips — these snacks are made in America.

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